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1995 World Championships in Athletics Gothenburg, Sweden

1995 5th IAAF World Championships - Gothenburg - Athletics Overview

 

05/08/1995 - 13/08/1995 Gothenburg Ullevi

SWE

Contested by 1755 athletes from 190 countries

Number of countries providing:

Champions: 24; Medallists: 43; Finalists/top 8: 66

LOC President: Bernt Gröön

Mascot: Kalo (lynx)

  Ullevi stadium
at1995ms Gothenburg was selected by the 1991 IAAF Council in August that year, in Tokyo, just before the World Championships. At the same meeting it was agreed that the championships would be staged every two years, with Stuttgart awarded the 1993 edition. There were 22 disqualifications for lane violations. The medallists’ podium had no steps but was in the design of a spiral with track markings. Results were posted on the internet within a minute of becoming official. A further service for the media was that all results were immediately distributed as electronic mail. “Journalists briefcases” were available to rent during the championships, containing a laptop, printer and mobile phone. Gothenburg had the world’s highest density of mobile phones according to the Information Technology Project Manager for the championships. A wireless local area network operated with a transmission speed of 256 kilobytes per second. An audience of 564,676 saw nine consecutive days of competition, including the first-ever World Championship 5000m for women (replacing the 3000m). A lively “Market Street” of shops and entertainment was established next to the stadium, much to the enjoyment of those attending the event. These were the last World Championships with no doping disqualifications.
1995 World Championships in Athletics logo.svg

The 5th World Championships in Athletics, under the auspices of the International Association of Athletics Federations, were held at the Ullevi Stadium, Gothenburg, Sweden on 5–13 August 1995.

This edition featured 1804 athletes from 191 nations.

This competition saw the women run the 5000 m event at the World Championships for the first time. The race replaced the 3000 m event which had been run at all previous World Championships.

IAAF World Championships history: Gothenburg 1995

In the next part of the series, Steve Smythe looks at the fifth World Championships, held in Sweden

The World Championships had first gone into a two-year cycle in 1991, and with the Olympics in 1992 it meant global championships were held on three successive years.

The relatively low-key 1994 meant athletes were raring to go again in 1995 and it was another superb event. Michael Johnson was the individual star with his unique 200m and 400m double, though the world record performances in the two triple jumps – both of which still stand – and the 400m hurdles meant it was an unforgettable experience.

While yet again there were more countries than ever winning gold medals and making finals, the United States dominated, claiming 10 more golds than any other country.

MEN’S SPRINTS & HURDLES

Johnson first tackled the 400m and in his fourth race in four days, blazed a 20.3 middle 200m and his 43.39 just missed the world record. It was his 46th successive final win and the margin was the most in a global one-lap final for 99 years.

He returned for four more races at 200m and there in his eighth race in seven days, went flat out for the world record and just missed the 19.72 with a 19.79, becoming the first man to do a global double.

Johnson looked more human in the 4x400m final as his 44.11 anchored USA to a two-second win.

The men’s 100m saw Commonwealth athletes take seven of the eight places with just one American, Mike Marsh, in fifth. Donovan Bailey won easily in 9.97 from team-mate Bruny Surin and the pair also spearheaded a Canadian 4x100m gold with the Americans failing to negotiate the heats.

USA did win the two hurdles races. Allen Johnson set a 13.00 PB into a slight headwind while Derrick Adkins won an exciting three-way battle in the longer event with former champion Samuel Matete and future champion Stephane Diagana.

MEN’S ENDURANCE

Kenyans had dominated the major 800m races since 1987 and a Kenyan-born athlete won easily again here. However, Wilson Kipketer did it in the colours of Denmark, even though he hadn’t acquired full citizenship.

Another easy winner was Noureddine Morceli who won his third successive 1500m title with a vicious 51.28 last lap, where the damage was done with a 25.2 penultimate 200m and he was then able to blow kisses and ease off in the straight to still beat up-and-coming Hicham El Guerrouj by over 1.5 seconds. Morceli set 1500m and mile records that year.

The 5000m wasn’t of the same standard as Ismael Kirui found a modest 56.56 last lap enough to successfully defend.

Haile Gebrselassie retained his 10,000m title with a superb 25.1 last 200m. His time was 27:12.95, the fastest ever major championships 25-lapper and he was chased home by Olympic champion Khalid Skah and Paul Tergat.

Yet another defender was Moses Kiptanui, in the year he became the first man to break eight minutes. He won his third successive 3000m steeplechase title and his 8:04.16 was also the best ever global time. He eased to victory and still won by five seconds.

Spain won the marathon as Martin Fiz sped by Dionicio Ceron at around 40km to win by 32 seconds.

Europe also were successful in the walks as Italian 21-year-old Michele Didoni won the 20km and Finland’s Valentin Kononen went one better than in 1993.

MEN’S FIELD

The men’s high jump was another quality event with five over 2.35m. Troy Kemp won on countback from defending champion Javier Sotomayor with a 2.37m.

Mike Powell failed to make it a triple long jump success and finished third, well behind Ivan Pedroso’s excellent 8.70m jump.

Three jumped 5.86m in the pole vault but the predictable winner was Sergey Bubka who won his fifth successive title and only needed three jumps to take gold with 5.92m. He also had a close attempt with one of his 6.15m world record jumps.

There was a record in the triple jump, though (see ‘British team performance’).

The shot was nothing special as John Godina won by half a metre and Lars Reidel was similarly dominant in the discus in winning his third title by nearly three metres.

Andrey Abduvaliyev retained his hammer crown with a final round 81.56m to deny Igor Astapkovich, who won his third successive silver to go with his Olympic silver. The three medallists were in the same order as 1993.

It was also as you were in terms of winning with the javelin as Zan Zelezny won easily with 89.58m and in the decathlon through a below his best Dan O’Brien who won his third title.

WOMEN’S SPRINTS AND HURDLES

Gwen Torrence completed her medal set at 100m with a narrow win in 10.85. The 200m seemingly saw Torrence win by three metres, in 21.77, for a stunning time into 2.2m/sec headwind.

Running in borrowed shoes as hers had been stolen, it later became clear she had stepped on the line and was disqualified. Gold thus went to Merlene Ottey, who won her fifth successive 200m medal.

In the relay, Torrence gave America victory just ahead of Ottey’s Jamaica in 42.12. The latter won a remarkable 13th medal. USA also won the 4x400m and the 100m hurdles as Gail Devers successfully defended easily.

The 400m was won in a fast time by Marie Jose Perec in 49.28, catching Cathy Freeman, who overdid it with a 23.3 first 200m and ultimately faded to fourth. The timetable was changed to enable Perec to attempt a double in the 400m hurdles but she chose not to compete and she missed a cracking race (see ‘most exciting contest’).

WOMEN’S ENDURANCE

Ana Quirot won the 800m in 1:56.11, helped by Maria Mutola being disqualified from the 800m semi-final for stepping on a line which ended her 42-race three-year unbeaten run.

Hassiba Boulmerka retained her 1500m title courtesy of a 29.5 last 200m. The clear world No.1 at 1500m, Sonia O’Sullivan, competed instead in the first ever 5000m, where a 28.8 final 200m gave her a two-second win over the 10,000m winner Fernanda Ribeiro. The latter outsprinted Olympic champion Derartu Tulu and so Portugal also won the marathon. Manuela Machado led home five other Europeans and her run would have been a big PB but the runners all did a 400m lap short at the start before leaving the stadium.

The 20km walk saw a European top seven led by Irina Stankina, who at the age of 18 became the youngest ever gold medallist at any event.

WOMEN’S FIELD

The triple jump was held for the second time and, just as in 1993, there was a world record.

Many thought this fledgling event was hardly scratching the surface of its potential and no would have guessed 22 years later that this would still be the record.

The day after the men’s world record, Inessa Kravets was jumping after two fouls but instead of going for a safe jump to qualify, she added an incredible 41 centimetres to the two-year-old record to become the first woman over 50 feet with a 15.50m. Ira Prandzheva also broke the old world record with a 15.18m leap.

World high jump record-holder Stefka Kostadinova, who had given birth to a son earlier in the year, made a late decision to compete and despite going to Sweden with a modest 1.94m season’s best, she was the only jumper over two metres as she won with a 2.01m leap.

Fiona May, who won a world junior title and failed to make the final in 1993 when in British colours, pulled off a shock long jump win for Italy with a very windy (4.3m/sec) 6.98m.

The two athletes who had dominated world long jumping for more than a decade, Jackie Joyner-Kersee and Heike Drechsler, failed to get a medal.

The heptathlon had looked like it might be a battle between the pair but both defending champion Joyner-Kersee and 1994 world No.1 Drechsler failed to finish.

Ghada Shouaa was a shocking winner, courtesy of a 54.92m javelin throw. Syria’s previous best result in any event was Shouaa’s 24th in 1991!

Germany’s Astrid Kumbernuss won the shot title by over a metre and Ellina Zvereva dominated the discus. Belarus also won the javelin thanks to Natalya Shikolenko.

MOST EXCITING CONTEST

For the second championships running, there was an exciting two-way battle for gold at 400m hurdles that ended in a world record with second also inside the old record. That was a surprise as many thought the event looked weak prior to the event with a mediocre 56.75 making the final.

Kim Batten and Tonja Buford battled all the way to the line and it was only Batten’s superior dip that gave her a 52.61 to 52.62 victory. Buford had been outside 55 seconds in her qualifying races.

BRITISH PERFORMANCES

In 1995, Jonathan Edwards (pictured) had set a world record 17.98m in the triple jump and on four other occasions had broken 18 metres but the wind had been over the limit. In Sweden, he got perfect conditions and in the opening round jumped a huge 18.16m – sensational enough – but with his next jump, sailed out to an unbelievable 18.29m, winning by an incredible 67cm with the next three all benefiting from windy jumps.

It was Britain’s only gold. Their big three from Stuttgart didn’t make an impression. Colin Jackson missed the event due to a mixture of a niggle and an argument with British Athletics. Sally Gunnell also didn’t compete. Linford Christie did but wasn’t fully fit, however he beat Bailey in Zurich shortly afterwards and had a superior win- loss record over the season to the two Canadians who beat him.

Tony Jarrett was a magnificent second in the 110m hurdles in 13.04 and Kelly Holmes won medals in both the 800m and 1500m.

Steve Backley moved into second with his final throw in the javelin.

TALKING POINT

Dan O’Brien easily won the decathlon in Sweden but you wouldn’t have known he was a clear winner immediately as he was only the 17th fastest in the final event, the 1500m.

Surely it would be possible for the combined events to have a handicapping system for the final event so the leader sets off in front, with the appropriate gaps to the competitors, so the final order of the last event is also the order of the overall competition?

» This feature was first published in the March 16 edition of AW magazine

Men's results

Track

Event Gold Silver Bronze
100 m Donovan Bailey
 Canada
9.97 Bruny Surin
 Canada
10.03 Ato Boldon
 Trinidad and Tobago
10.03
200 m Michael Johnson
 United States
19.79
CR
Frankie Fredericks
 Namibia
20.12 Jeff Williams
 United States
20.18
400 m Michael Johnson
 United States
43.39
CR
Butch Reynolds
 United States
44.22 Greg Haughton
 Jamaica
44.56
800 m Wilson Kipketer
 Denmark
1:45.08 Arthémon Hatungimana
 Burundi
1:45.64 Vebjørn Rodal
 Norway
1:45.68
1,500 m Noureddine Morceli
 Algeria
3:33.73 Hicham El Guerrouj
 Morocco
3:35.28 Vénuste Niyongabo
 Burundi
3:35.56
5,000 m Ismael Kirui
 Kenya
13:16.77 Khalid Bouhlami
 Morocco
13:17.15 Shem Kororia
 Kenya
13:17.59
10,000 m Haile Gebrselassie
 Ethiopia
27:12.95
CR
Khalid Skah
 Morocco
27:14.53 Paul Tergat
 Kenya
27:14.70
Marathon Martín Fiz
 Spain
2:11:41 Dionicio Cerón
 Mexico
2:12:13 Luíz Antônio dos Santos
 Brazil
2:12:49
110 m hurdles Allen Johnson
 United States
13.00 Tony Jarrett
 Great Britain
13.04 Roger Kingdom
 United States
13.19
400 m hurdles Derrick Adkins
 United States
47.98 Samuel Matete
 Zambia
48.03 Stéphane Diagana
 France
48.14
3,000 m st. Moses Kiptanui
 Kenya
8:04.16
CR
Christopher Koskei
 Kenya
8:09.30 Saad Al-Asmari
 Saudi Arabia
8:12.95
AR
20 km walk Michele Didoni
 Italy
1:19:59 Valentí Massana
 Spain
1:20:23 Yevgeniy Misyulya
 Belarus
1:20:48
50 km walk Valentin Kononen
 Finland
3:43:42 Giovanni Perricelli
 Italy
3:45:11 Robert Korzeniowski
 Poland
3:45:57
4 × 100 m relay  Canada (CAN)
Donovan Bailey
Robert Esmie
Glenroy Gilbert
Bruny Surin
38.31  Australia (AUS)
Paul Henderson
Tim Jackson
Steve Brimacombe
Damien Marsh
38.50  Italy (ITA)
Giovanni Puggioni
Ezio Madonia
Angelo Cipolloni
Sandro Floris
39.07
4 × 400 m relay  United States (USA)
Marlon Ramsey
Derek Mills
Butch Reynolds
Michael Johnson
Kevin Lyles*
Darnell Hall*
2:57.32  Jamaica (JAM)
Michael McDonald
Davian Clarke
Danny McFarlane
Greg Haughton
Dennis Blake*
2:59.88  Nigeria (NGR)
Udeme Ekpeyong
Kunle Adejuyigbe
Jude Monye
Sunday Bada
3:03.18
WR world record | AR area record | CR championship record | GR games record | NR national record | OR Olympic record | PB personal best | SB season best | WL world leading (in a given season)

Note: * Indicates athletes who ran in preliminary rounds.

Field

Event Gold Silver Bronze
Long jump Iván Pedroso
 Cuba
8.70 James Beckford
 Jamaica
8.30 Mike Powell
 United States
8.29
Triple jump Jonathan Edwards
 Great Britain
18.29
(WR)
Brian Wellman
 Bermuda
17.62 Jérôme Romain
 Dominica
17.59
High jump Troy Kemp
 Bahamas
2.37 Javier Sotomayor
 Cuba
2.37 Artur Partyka
 Poland
2.35
Pole vault Sergey Bubka
 Ukraine
5.92 Maksim Tarasov
 Russia
5.86 Jean Galfione
 France
5.86
Shot put John Godina
 United States
21.47 Mika Halvari
 Finland
20.93 Randy Barnes
 United States
20.41
Discus throw Lars Riedel
 Germany
68.76
(CR)
Vladimir Dubrovshchik
 Belarus
65.98 Vasiliy Kaptyukh
 Belarus
65.88
Hammer throw Andrey Abduvaliyev
 Tajikistan
81.56 Igor Astapkovich
 Belarus
81.10 Tibor Gécsek
 Hungary
80.98
Javelin throw Jan Železný
 Czech Republic
89.58 Steve Backley
 Great Britain
86.30 Boris Henry
 Germany
86.08
Decathlon Dan O'Brien
 United States
8695 Eduard Hämäläinen
 Belarus
8489 Mike Smith
 Canada
8419
WR world record | AR area record | CR championship record | GR games record | NR national record | OR Olympic record | PB personal best | SB season best | WL world leading (in a given season)

Women's results

Track

Event Gold Silver Bronze
100 m  Gwen Torrence (USA) 10.85  Merlene Ottey (JAM) 10.94  Irina Privalova (RUS) 10.96
200 m  Merlene Ottey (JAM) 22.12  Irina Privalova (RUS) 22.12  Galina Malchugina (RUS) 22.37
400 m  Marie-José Pérec (FRA) 49.28  Pauline Davis (BAH) 49.96  Jearl Miles (USA) 50.00
800 m  Ana Fidelia Quirot (CUB) 1:56.11  Letitia Vriesde (SUR) 1:56.68
(AR)
 Kelly Holmes (GBR) 1:56.95
1,500 m  Hassiba Boulmerka (ALG) 4:02.42  Kelly Holmes (GBR) 4:03.04  Carla Sacramento (POR) 4:03.79
5,000 m  Sonia O'Sullivan (IRL) 14:46.47
(CR)
 Fernanda Ribeiro (POR) 14:48.54  Zahra Ouaziz (MAR) 14:53.77
10,000 m  Fernanda Ribeiro (POR) 31:04.99  Derartu Tulu (ETH) 31:08.10  Tegla Loroupe (KEN) 31:17.66
Marathon  Manuela Machado (POR) 2:25:39  Anuța Cătună (ROU) 2:26:25  Ornella Ferrara (ITA) 2:30:11
The marathon course was 400 m short of the normal distance.
100 m hurdles  Gail Devers (USA) 12.68  Olga Shishigina (KAZ) 12.80  Yuliya Graudyn (RUS) 12.85
400 m hurdles  Kim Batten (USA) 52.61
(WR)
 Tonja Buford (USA) 52.62  Deon Hemmings (JAM) 53.48
(NR)
10 km walk  Irina Stankina (RUS) 42:13
(CR)
 Elisabetta Perrone (ITA) 42:16  Yelena Nikolayeva (RUS) 42:20
4 × 100 m relay  United States (USA)
Celena Mondie-Milner
Carlette Guidry
Chryste Gaines
Gwen Torrence
D'Andre Hill*
42.12  Jamaica (JAM)
Dahlia Duhaney
Juliet Cuthbert
Beverly McDonald
Merlene Ottey
Michelle Freeman*
42.25  Germany (GER)
Melanie Paschke
Silke Lichtenhagen
Silke-Beate Knoll
Gabriele Becker
43.01
4 × 400 m relay  United States (USA)
Kim Graham
Rochelle Stevens
Camara Jones
Jearl Miles
Nicole Green*
3:22.29  Russia (RUS)
Tatyana Chebykina
Svetlana Goncharenko
Yuliya Sotnikova
Yelena Andreyeva
Tatyana Zakharova*
3:23.98  Australia (AUS)
Lee Naylor
Renée Poetschka
Melinda Gainsford-Taylor
Cathy Freeman
3:25.88
WR world record | AR area record | CR championship record | GR games record | NR national record | OR Olympic record | PB personal best | SB season best | WL world leading (in a given season)

Note: * Indicates athletes who ran in preliminary rounds.

Field

Event Gold Silver Bronze
Long jump  Fiona May (ITA) 6.98  Niurka Montalvo (CUB) 6.86  Irina Mushayilova (RUS) 6.83
Triple jump  Inessa Kravets (UKR) 15.50
(WR)
 Iva Prandzheva (BUL) 15.18  Anna Biryukova (RUS) 15.08
High jump  Stefka Kostadinova (BUL) 2.01  Alina Astafei (GER) 1.99  Inha Babakova (UKR) 1.99
Shot put  Astrid Kumbernuss (GER) 21.22  Huang Zhihong (CHN) 20.04  Svetla Mitkova (BUL) 19.56
Discus throw  Ellina Zvereva (BLR) 68.64  Ilke Wyludda (GER) 67.20  Olga Chernyavskaya (RUS) 66.86
Javelin throw  Natalya Shikolenko (BLR) 67.56  Felicia Tilea (ROU) 65.22  Mikaela Ingberg (FIN) 65.16
Heptathlon  Ghada Shouaa (SYR) 6651  Svetlana Moskalets (RUS) 6575  Rita Ináncsi (HUN) 6522
WR world record | AR area record | CR championship record | GR games record | NR national record | OR Olympic record | PB personal best | SB season best | WL world leading (in a given season)

Medal table

Note that the host, Sweden, did not win any medals at these championships. This fate Sweden shares only with Canada (2001).

 
Rank Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1  United States (USA) 12 2 5 19
2  Belarus (BLR) 2 3 2 7
3  Germany (GER) 2 2 2 6
 Italy (ITA) 2 2 2 6
5  Cuba (CUB) 2 2 0 4
6  Kenya (KEN) 2 1 3 6
7  Canada (CAN) 2 1 1 4
 Portugal (POR) 2 1 1 4
9  Ukraine (UKR) 2 0 1 3
10  Algeria (ALG) 2 0 0 2
11  Russia (RUS) 1 4 7 12
12  Jamaica (JAM) 1 4 2 7
13  Great Britain (GBR) 1 3 1 5
14  Bulgaria (BUL) 1 1 1 3
 Finland (FIN) 1 1 1 3
16  Bahamas (BAH) 1 1 0 2
 Ethiopia (ETH) 1 1 0 2
 Spain (ESP) 1 1 0 2
19  France (FRA) 1 0 2 3
20  Czech Republic (CZE) 1 0 0 1
 Denmark (DEN) 1 0 0 1
 Ireland (IRL) 1 0 0 1
 Syria (SYR) 1 0 0 1
 Tajikistan (TJK) 1 0 0 1
25  Morocco (MAR) 0 3 1 4
26  Romania (ROU) 0 2 0 2
27  Australia (AUS) 0 1 1 2
 Burundi (BDI) 0 1 1 2
29  Bermuda (BER) 0 1 0 1
 China (CHN) 0 1 0 1
 Kazakhstan (KAZ) 0 1 0 1
 Mexico (MEX) 0 1 0 1
 Namibia (NAM) 0 1 0 1
 Suriname (SUR) 0 1 0 1
 Zambia (ZAM) 0 1 0 1
36  Hungary (HUN) 0 0 2 2
 Poland (POL) 0 0 2 2
38  Brazil (BRA) 0 0 1 1
 Dominica (DMA) 0 0 1 1
 Nigeria (NGR) 0 0 1 1
 Norway (NOR) 0 0 1 1
 Saudi Arabia (KSA) 0 0 1 1
 Trinidad and Tobago (TTO) 0 0 1 1
Totals (43 nations) 44 44 44 132

Placing Table 

Rank Country Gold Silver Bronze Fourth Fifth Sixth Seventh Eighth Points
1 UNITED STATES UNITED STATES 12 2 5 2 5 4 7 4 200
2 RUSSIA RUSSIA 1 3 7 6 4 2 7 4 141
3 GERMANY GERMANY 2 2 2 8 2 4 2 4 110
4 GREAT BRITAIN & N.I. GREAT BRITAIN & N.I. 1 3 1 3 3 3 3 0 77
5 JAMAICA JAMAICA 1 4 2 1 0 2 1 3 64
6 ITALY ITALY 2 2 2 1 2 1 2 1 63
7 BELARUS BELARUS 2 3 2 0 1 1 1 2 60
8 CUBA CUBA 2 2 0 2 1 1 4 2 57
9 KENYA KENYA 2 1 3 1 1 1 1 0 55
10 MOROCCO MOROCCO 0 3 1 3 1 0 0 0 46
11 UKRAINE UKRAINE 2 0 1 1 2 0 3 1 42
12 FRANCE FRANCE 1 0 2 1 1 3 1 1 41
13 CANADA CANADA 2 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 38
13 FINLAND FINLAND 1 1 1 2 1 1 0 0 38
15 ROMANIA ROMANIA 0 2 0 1 2 1 1 0 32
16 SPAIN SPAIN 1 1 0 0 2 2 0 2 31
17 PORTUGAL PORTUGAL 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 30
18 AUSTRALIA AUSTRALIA 0 1 1 1 2 0 0 2 28
19 NIGERIA NIGERIA 0 0 1 0 1 4 2 1 27
19 POLAND POLAND 0 0 2 1 1 1 1 1 27
21 BULGARIA BULGARIA 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 2 25
22 PR OF CHINA PR OF CHINA 0 1 0 0 2 2 1 1 24
23 BAHAMAS BAHAMAS 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 20
23 NORWAY NORWAY 0 0 1 1 0 3 0 0 20
25 BRAZIL BRAZIL 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 19
25 ETHIOPIA ETHIOPIA 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 19
27 HUNGARY HUNGARY 0 0 1 2 0 0 1 0 18
28 ALGERIA ALGERIA 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 16
29 BURUNDI BURUNDI 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 13
30 CZECH REPUBLIC CZECH REPUBLIC 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 12
30 MEXICO MEXICO 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 12
30 NAMIBIA NAMIBIA 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 12
33 SWEDEN SWEDEN 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 11
34 SOUTH AFRICA SOUTH AFRICA 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 10
35 DENMARK DENMARK 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8
35 IRELAND IRELAND 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8
35 KAZAKHSTAN KAZAKHSTAN 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 8
35 TAJIKISTAN TAJIKISTAN 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8
39 BERMUDA BERMUDA 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 7
39 JAPAN JAPAN 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 7
39 SURINAM SURINAM 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 7
39 ZAMBIA ZAMBIA 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 7
43 Commonwealth of DOMINICA Commonwealth of DOMINICA 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 6
43 SAUDI ARABIA SAUDI ARABIA 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 6
43 TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 6
46 ESTONIA ESTONIA 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 5
47 SERBIA AND MONTENEGRO- SERBIA AND MONTENEGRO- 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 4
47 SWITZERLAND SWITZERLAND 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 4
49 GREECE GREECE 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 3
49 NETHERLANDS NETHERLANDS 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 3
49 ZIMBABWE ZIMBABWE 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 3
52 COLOMBIA COLOMBIA 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2
52 QATAR QATAR 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2
54 LITHUANIA LITHUANIA 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1
54 SLOVENIA SLOVENIA 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1
54 SLOVAK REPUBLIC SLOVAK REPUBLIC 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1

 

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