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2001 World Championships in Athletics Edmonton, Canada

2001 8th IAAF World Championships - Edmonton - Men's Javelin Throw

 

 

Host City: Edmonton, Alberta, Canada Format: Qualifying round (84.00 or top 12 to final) (Aug 10)
Dates: August 3–12, 2001
Nations participating: 189
Athletes participating: 1677
    Main venue: Commonwealth Stadium
Overview by IAAF   EDMONTON STADIUM 
This was the last of the four men’s throws in Edmonton, and the third in which the championship record was beaten. In fact it fell three times. In the qualifying round, 35 year-old Jan Železný reached 90.76 to confirm he was ready to regain his title at his seventh championships. One who did not qualify was two-time silver medallist Steve Backley, though his compatriot Mick Hill, another veteran from Rome 1987, reached his sixth final, while defending champion Parviainen scraped through in 11th place. Surprisingly, Železný’s new meeting record did not survive the first round of the final, because Parviainen opened with 91.31. In any other javelin competition, this would have been a winner but in round 2 Železný’s spear went out to 92.80. Gatsioúdis won his third successive world medal, a bronze
 These are the official results of the Men's Javelin Throw event at the 2001 World Championships in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. There were a total number of 27 participating athletes, with the final held on Sunday August 12, 2001. The qualification mark was set at 84.00 metres.

Records

Standing records prior to the 2001 World Athletics Championships
World Record  Jan Železný (CZE) 98.48 m May 25, 1996 Germany Jena, Germany
Event Record  Jan Železný (CZE) 89.58 m August 13, 1995 Sweden Gothenburg, Sweden
Season Best  Aki Parviainen (FIN) 92.41 m June 24, 2001 Finland Vaasa, Finland
Broken records during the 2001 World Athletics Championships
Event Record  Aki Parviainen (FIN) 91.31 m August 12, 2001 Canada Edmonton, Canada
Event Record  Jan Železný (CZE) 92.80 m
Season Best
 
  Javelin Throw 12 August
Men's Javelin Throw final - corrected
Three time Olympic javelin champion Jan ZELEZNY proved, if proof was still needed, that he is the greatest javelin thrower ever. Today with a 92.80m second round throw, he produced a championship record to snatch the gold medal from the hands of Finland’s defending champion Aki PARVIAINEN, who had set a short lived championship best with his first throw of 91.39 metres. Greece’s Konstadinos GATSIOUDIS was third with an impressive 89.95 metres and seemed to be suffering from a leg injury.
PARVIAINEN let loose a magnificent championship record in the first round, throwing in 10th position. In doing so he took the competition lead from America’s Breaux GREER who had set a personal best of 87.00m. PARVIAINEN had only qualified for the final with a throw of 81.82m!
Having fouled with his first attempt, Greece’s Konstadinos GATSIOUDIS, the World silver medallist from two years ago, sent the javelin flying to 88.39m with his next to take a temporary second place. Temporary because the next thrower was world record holder ZELEZNY, who had been below par with 81.76m in the first round.
Ominously for both PARVIAINEN and GATSIOUDIS, as the Czech took his place at the beginning of his approach for his second round throw, the stadium announcer mistakenly called him the "current leader". These were prophetic words indeed because with the determination which has taken him to three Olympic gold medals, the great Czech blasted an enormous 92.80m, taking first place and the championship record.
With PARVIAINEN fouling his second and third throws and GATSIOUDIS and ZELEZNY producing 87.54m and 89.45m respectively, the competition calmed. In any other meeting either of these marks would have won the competition but such was the standard of the first two rounds today they hardly drew any attention at all!
All but GATSIOUDIS fouled with their fourth round throws and with his attempt the Greek improved to 89.95m to consolidate his bronze medal position. In the fifth, ZELEZNY threw another marvellous 87.28m and then fouled with his last. The competition and a third world title was already in the Czech’s possession.
PARVIAINEN had shot his bolt in the first round. Even with ZELEZNY in the field, the Finn must have been shocked to have been surpassed, having thrown over 91 metres.
In terms of the medal placings, this was the highest ever quality competition with 89.95 metres being required for bronze. The previous longest throw for third place had been 87.67m by ZELEZNY in Seville. Never had two men been over 90 metres in a world championship final before. Unluckily for PARVIAINEN this was the second time in his career that he had found himself in second place in a competition despite having thrown 90 metres. The first occasion had been in Kuortane, Finland last year, when GATSIOUDIS had beaten him 91.69m to 90.97m.
Largely forgotten in fifth and sixth places were the Germans Raymond HECHT and Boris HENRY, whose marks of 86.46m and 85.52m were also great performances.
  Final
1 Jan Železný CZE 16 Jun 66 92.80
2 Aki Parviainen FIN 26 Oct 74 91.31
3 Konstandínos Gatsioúdis GRE 17 Dec 73 89.95
4 Breaux Greer USA 19 Oct 76 87.00
5 Raymond Hecht GER 11 Nov 68 86.46
6 Boris Henry GER 14 Dec 73 85.52
7 Sergey Makarov RUS 19 Mar 73 83.64
8 Ēriks Rags LAT 1 Jun 75 82.82
9 Li Rongxiang CHN 8 Jan 72 81.80
10 Aleksandr Ivanov RUS 25 May 82 80.56
11 Voldemārs Lūsis LAT 7 Dec 74 79.70
12 Mick Hill GBR 22 Oct 64 77.81
Final 14:40 Distance 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6
1 Jan Zelezny CZE 92.80m 81.76 92.80 89.45 X 87.28 X
2 Aki Parviainen FIN 91.31m 91.31 X X X X X
3 Konstadinos Gatsioudis GRE 89.95m X 88.39 87.54 89.95 X X
4 Breaux Greer USA 87.00m 87.00 85.61 X X X X
5 Raymond Hecht GER 86.46m 80.61 80.24 86.46 X 81.59 X
6 Boris Henry GER 85.52m 80.70 85.52 84.52 X 85.51 85.33
7 Sergey Makarov RUS 83.64m 83.64 78.59 X X
8 Eriks Rags LAT 82.82m 77.83 79.56 82.82 X 79.66 X
9 Rongxiang Li CHN 81.80m 79.98 81.80 81.70
10 Alexandr Ivanov RUS 80.56m X 78.85 80.56
11 Voldemars Lusis LAT 79.70m X X 79.70
12 Mick Hill GBR 77.81m 77.81 X X
Men's Javelin Qualification
The Czech Republic’s Jan ZELEZNY, the three time Olympic champion, throwing in Group “B” of the preliminary round of the men’s javelin, produced a championship’s record of 90.76m, to lead the qualifiers into Sunday’s final. However, we will not witness a repeat of the epic battle ZELEZNY had in Sydney last summer, with Britain’s three time European champion Steve BACKLEY. The British number one was eliminated in 14th position with a mere 81.50m, which was the best of his three efforts in Group “A”. Just over two weeks ago, BACKLEY had thrown 90.81m in London, to become the world’s fourth longest thrower of the year.
The 1999 World silver medallist, Konstadinos GATSIOUDIS of Greece, led a list of three automatic qualifiers - 84.00m - from group “A” with a first throw of 87.81m. The other automatics were Germany’s Olympic fourth placer, Raymond HECHT with 84.90m also on his first try. With his last effort was Eriks RAGS of Latvia with 84.13m.
Three men also went through to the final by right in the second pool. Behind ZELEZNY’s epic 90.76m opener, Boris HENRY of Germany, who was 7th in Sydney, produced (86.53m), and Britain’s European silver medallist, Mick HILL (84.88m), also only needed just one attempt.
Of the other overall top twelve, American champion Breaux GREER (83.60m), the newly crowned European champion Alexandr IVANOV (83.18m) of Russia and his compatriot, the Olympic bronze medallist Sergey MAKAROV, were secure in the final.
We were reminded of one of the great all-time names of javelin throwing, when Valdemars LUSIS, the son of four time European champion Janis LUSIS of Latvia, produced 81.85m for 10th best. Also proceeding into the final was China’s Rongxiang LI (81.78m).
Struggling in eleventh place of the twelve qualified throwers, was Finland’s defending champion Aki PARVIAINEN with 81.82m, the only one of four Finns who reached the final.
As well as BACKLEY, there were number of other top names who failed tonight. Poland’s Dariusz TRAFAS and Germany’s Peter BLANK, who had thrown 87.17m and 88.70m respectively this year, were eliminated with 81.38m and 80.96m. Norway’s Andreas THORDKILDSEN, was some way short of the world junior record (83.87m), which he established this summer.
  Qualification 10 August
Jan Železný CZE 16 Jun 66 90.76 Q
Konstandínos Gatsioúdis GRE 17 Dec 73 87.81 Q
Boris Henry GER 14 Dec 73 86.53 Q
Raymond Hecht GER 11 Nov 68 84.90 Q
Mick Hill GBR 22 Oct 64 84.88 Q
Ēriks Rags LAT 1 Jun 75 84.13 Q
Breaux Greer USA 19 Oct 76 83.60 q
Aleksandr Ivanov RUS 25 May 82 83.18 q
Sergey Makarov RUS 19 Mar 73 82.92 q
Voldemārs Lūsis LAT 7 Dec 74 81.85 q
Aki Parviainen FIN 26 Oct 74 81.82 q
Li Rongxiang CHN 8 Jan 72 81.78 q
Scott Russell CAN 16 Jan 79 81.66
Steve Backley GBR 12 Feb 69 81.50
Harri Haatainen FIN 5 Jan 78 81.43
Dariusz Trafas POL 16 May 72 81.38
Peter Blank GER 10 Apr 62 80.96
Emeterio González CUB 11 Apr 73 79.71
Juha Laukkanen FIN 6 Jan 69 78.28
Tom Pukstys USA 28 May 68 78.10
Nick Nieland GBR 31 Jan 72 78.02
Vadim Bavikin ISR 4 Oct 70 77.91
Sergey Voynov UZB 26 Feb 77 76.77
Terry McHugh IRL 22 Aug 63 75.49
Marc Van Mensel BEL 18 May 71 71.89
Andreas Thorkildsen NOR 1 Apr 82 68.41
Matti Närhi FIN 17 Aug 75 NM
Group A 19:10 Distance 1. 2. 3.
1 Konstadinos Gatsioudis GRE 87.81m 87.81
2 Raymond Hecht GER 84.90m 84.90
3 Eriks Rags LAT 84.13m 81.99 77.86 84.13
4 Alexandr Ivanov RUS 83.18m 83.18 78.04 X
5 Rongxiang Li CHN 81.78m 81.39 81.78 80.71
6 Steve Backley GBR 81.50m 81.50 80.63 81.40
7 Harri Haatainen FIN 81.43m X 79.61 81.43
8 Dariusz Trafas POL 81.38m 79.06 81.38 81.07
9 Peter Blank GER 80.96m 80.96 79.11 X
10 Emeterio Gonzalez CUB 79.71m 74.38 79.71 72.96
11 Tom Pukstys USA 78.10m 78.10 X 72.88
12 Vadim Bavikin ISR 77.91m 77.91 X 71.59
13 Sergey Voynov UZB 76.77m 76.77 X X
- Matti Narhi FIN NM X X X
Group B 21:00 Distance 1. 2. 3.
1 Jan Zelezny CZE 90.76m 90.76
2 Boris Henry GER 86.53m 86.53
3 Mick Hill GBR 84.88m 84.88
4 Breaux Greer USA 83.60m 83.60 79.26 -
5 Sergey Makarov RUS 82.92m 81.80 82.92 80.10
6 Voldemars Lusis LAT 81.85m 76.13 X 81.85
7 Aki Parviainen FIN 81.82m 81.82 X 81.17
8 Scott Russell CAN 81.66m 79.98 80.04 81.66
9 Juha Laukkanen FIN 78.28m 78.28 X X
10 Nick Nieland GBR 78.02m 78.02 71.61 X
11 Terry McHugh IRL 75.49m 71.99 75.49 73.12
12 Marc Van Mensel BEL 71.89m 71.89 X X
13 Andreas Thorkildsen NOR 68.41m 66.42 X 68.41

Group A 10 AUG 2001 19:10 

Order / LaneBibATHLETECOUNTRYPBSB 2001
1 241 Emeterio González CUB CUB 87.12 82.77
2 347 Harri Haatainen FIN FIN 86.10 86.05
3 970 Aleksandr Ivanov RUS RUS 83.55 83.55
4 475 Raymond Hecht GER GER 92.60 87.82
5 500 Konstantinos Gatsioudis GRE GRE 91.69 91.27
6 199 Rongxiang Li CHN CHN 84.29 81.55
7 571 Vadim Bavikin ISR ISR 81.56 80.54
8 411 Steve Backley GBR GBR 91.46 90.81
9 357 Matti Närhi FIN FIN 88.24 84.21
10 723 Eriks Rags LAT LAT 86.47 86.47
11 1195 Tom Pukstys USA USA 87.12 79.48
12 1221 Sergey Voynov UZB UZB 84.80 82.71
13 907 Dariusz Trafas POL POL 87.17 85.78
14 458 Peter Blank GER GER 88.70 88.70

Group B 10 AUG 2001 21:00 

Order / LaneBibATHLETECOUNTRYPBSB 2001
1 862 Andreas Thorkildsen NOR NOR 83.87 83.87
2 432 Mick Hill GBR GBR 86.94 83.42
3 565 Terry McHugh IRL IRL 82.75 77.45
4 90 Marc Van Mensel BEL BEL 81.59 81.59
5 977 Sergey Makarov RUS RUS 89.93 88.42
6 439 Nick Nieland GBR GBR 85.09 82.93
7 1168 Breaux Greer USA USA 85.91 85.91
8 358 Aki Parviainen FIN FIN 93.09 92.41
9 181 Scott Russell CAN CAN 80.17 80.17
10 265 Jan Zelezný CZE CZE 98.48 91.24
11 364 Juha Laukkanen FIN FIN 88.22 85.40
12 476 Boris Henry GER GER 90.44 86.38
13 722 Voldemars Lusis LAT LAT 83.08 81.86
 

 

 

 

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