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2007 World Championships in Athletics Osaka, Japan

2007 11th IAAF World Championships - Osaka - Men's Javelin Throw

 

 

Host City: Osaka, Japan Format: Qualifying round (82.00 or top 12 to final) (Aug 31)
Dates: 24 August - 2 September 2007
Nations participating: 200
Athletes participating: 1,978
    Main venue: Nagai Stadium
Overview by IAAF   nagai stadium01 
The most eagerly awaited field event in Osaka saw 2007’s two 91m men – Greer and Pitkämäki – pitted against Olympic champion Thorkildsen. The qualifying was led by Vasievskis and Greer, but the final was led at the end of round one by Russia’s talented Ivanov, with his competition best of 85.18. Pitkämäki, whose style was reminiscent of the 1959 world record setter Al Cantello, launched himself bodily in a dive in throwing 89.16 in round two. He was immediately followed by Vasievskis (85.19) and Thorkildsen (88.61) who were inspired to their best of the competition. The Finn supported his best throw with 87.76 in round four, and only Greer improved in round five – from sixth to bronze with 86.21. Thorkildsen managed a fine 87.33, and then Pitkämäki, with the gold medal sewn up, produced a beauty of a throw, which landed beyond 90m at 90.33. He thus became the fourth Finnish man to win the world javelin title.
 The Men's Javelin Throw event at the 2007 World Championships in Athletics took place on August 31, 2007 (qualification round) and 2 September 2007 (final round) at the Nagai Stadium in Osaka, Japan. There were a total number of 36 competing athletes from 22 countries.

Records

Standing records prior to the 2007 World Athletics Championships
World Record  Jan Železný (CZE) 98.48 m May 25, 1996 Germany Jena, Germany
Event Record  Jan Železný (CZE) 92.80 m August 12, 2001 Canada Edmonton, Canada
Season Best  Breaux Greer (USA) 91.29 m June 21, 2007 United States Indianapolis, United States
 
  Javelin Throw 2 September
  Final

Event report: Men’s Javelin Final

Tero Pitkamaki had gone unbeaten all season apart from the freak accident in Rome, when an errant spear hit French long jumper, Salim Sdiri, putting the Finn off the competition.

On that single occasion he was beaten by the man who has finished in front of him in both the Athens Olympics and the Helsinki World championships, Andreas Thorkildsen, of Norway.

This time, though, it was the Norwegian who was to leave with the sound of second best ringing in his ears.

In the lead from round two when he went out to what was to prove an unassailable 89.16, the man from Ilmajoki capped a wonderful night for Finnish athletics in the sixth round with a resounding 90.33.

Try as he might, Thorkildsen never managed to reach the same lengths. Maybe all the rumours of a back problem and intensive treatment that had surfaced during the week in Osaka had some substance.

For the second time in a row, Norway had to be content with silver at the World championships.

Even quieter than Thorkildsen was world leader Breaux Greer. There had been a deal of friendly banter between the Norwegian and the American prior to the final. But qualifying for the final throw-off in sixth, Greer's grim mood did not improve until his fifth round 86.21 to claim bronze.

Nonetheless, it was a fine achievement for a man who has emerged from three years of surgery with a reconstructed shoulder.  

In sixth and seventh, there was an illustration of how important championships are, even in the lower placings. Both Robert Osthuizen of South Africa and Poland’s Igor Janik will go home with personal bests of 84.52 and 83.38 respectively.

Round one and for Pitkamaki’s opener the angle was wrong and the spear inscribed a high arc, coming down early at 81.62. He had struggled to get through the qualifiers. Was this to be another struggle?

Thorkildsen fared no better and was unhappy as soon as the javelin left his hand – 82.78 for second was small beer. For a man who had threatened to kill the competition off at the first, this was not impressive.

World leader Greer fouled deliberately after his spear fell well short of the 80m line. This was not a night for accepting half measures when you had thrown over 90m earlier in the summer. 

After round one Russian Aleksandr Ivanov led with 85.18 from Oosterhuizen and Thorkildsen.

Pitkamaki brought out the heavy artillery for his second effort. A soon as the spear left his hand he raised his arms high, knowing he had hit it right. The scoreboard flashed up 89.16 and he was in the lead.

Thorkildsen’s reply was not long in coming - 88.61 and it was game on. Or so it seemed, but that was where the situation was to remain for the top two.

By the end of the second round Vadims Vasilevskis of Latvia had moved into bronze with Greer languishing in eighth. Now it seemed to be no longer a question of whether he would win, but would he survive the cut?

Meanwhile, up front Pitkamaki put down another long marker of 87.72 in the fourth. The confidence was beginning to show.

It was in the fifth that Greer finally got one right and moved into bronze.

Thorkildsen looked uncharacteristically out of sorts and stepped over the mark for another sub-par effort. One to go. Was he once more to finish second in a world championship?

After his final effort had no effect on the standings, Breer led the rhythmic clapping for Thorkildsen. The Norwegian put all he could into his throw, but from the moment it left his hand he knew he was beaten.

It was left to Pitkamaki to collect himself for a final effort to seal the title. Finland would once again celebrate in style.

Osaka 2007 News Team/mb

1 Tero Pitkamaki FIN 19 Dec 82 90.33
2 Andreas Thorkildsen NOR 1 Apr 82 88.61
3 Breaux Greer USA 19 Oct 76 86.21
4 Vadims Vasilevskis LAT 5 Jan 82 85.19
5 Aleksandr Ivanov RUS 25 May 82 85.18
6 Robert Oosthuizen RSA 23 Jan 87 84.52
7 Igor Janik POL 18 Jan 83 83.38
8 Tero Jarvenpaa FIN 2 Oct 84 82.10
9 Guillermo Martinez CUB 28 Jun 81 82.03
10 Magnus Arvidsson SWE 20 Feb 83 81.98
11 Eriks Rags LAT 1 Jun 75 80.01
12 Teemu Wirkkala FIN 14 Jan 84 78.01
Final Team dist. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.
1 Tero Pitkämäki FIN 90.33 m 81.62 89.16 83.64 87.72 X 90.33
2 Andreas Thorkildsen NOR 88.61 m 82.78 88.61 X 82.80 X 87.33
3 Breaux Greer USA 86.21 m X 80.67 84.31 X 86.21 83.81
4 Vadims Vasilevskis LAT 85.19 m X 85.19 X 77.42 X X
5 Aleksandr Ivanov RUS 85.18 m 85.18 84.71 81.42 84.91 81.55 X
6 John Robert Oosthuizen RSA 84.52 m 84.52 79.77 X 79.18 X X
7 Igor Janik POL 83.38 m 79.82 X 83.38 X X
8 Tero Järvenpää FIN 82.10 m 80.30 79.40 82.10 X 77.30 75.40
9 Guillermo Martínez CUB 82.03 m 82.03 81.19 X
10 Magnus Arvidsson SWE 81.98 m 79.80 X 81.98
11 Ēriks Rags LAT 80.01 m X 77.22 80.01
12 Teemu Wirkkala FIN 78.01 m 78.01 X 76.48
  Qualification 31 August

Event report: Men’s Javelin Throw Qualifying

The morning javelin qualification is a graveyard for some and the title ambitions of the defending World champion, Andrus Varnik, were buried with the minimum of fuss.

After two fouls and a season’s best of 75.96, the Estonian bowed out on a drizzly morning in Osaka.

The top four in the world this year survived, some by the skin of their teeth.

The longest throw came from Latvian Vadims Vasilevskis who threw 87.37, but that only came after a foul and a mediocre 72.80.

Much-fancied Tero Pitkamaki (FIN) was only 10th overall with a best of 80.62 and did not look best satisfied.

World leader, Breaux Greer, needed the full complement of throws before he got it right with 86.78.

“To be honest, qualifying wasn't that hard with the standard at 82m,” explained Greer. “But there were kind of weird conditions. I didn't think of it because we've got longer spikes, but with the rain, the runway had become very soft.

"Hopefully it won't be wet in the final. In the second attempt, the wind caught it. The wind is just a lot stronger than what you'd think. Now the 90m are coming. Hopefully, there'll be three or four of us doing it and that is going to be exciting.”

Olympic champion and World silver medallist, Andreas Thorkildsen, fouled in the first round then qualified with the minimum of fuss in the second, his spear going out to 82.33.

“I was a bit unlucky touching the line on my first attempt,” said the Norwegian. “I saw that Greer slipped about 20cm, so on my second one I slowed down and played cautious. Right now, I feel OK. I'm not really sure yet about my plan for Sunday. Hopefully, I can go for six maximum throws. If not, I"ll give it all on the first one.”

Only three athletes qualified on their first effort: Tero Jarvenpaa (FIN) with a season’s best 84.35, Swedish champion Magnus Arvidsson 84.17 and Cuba’s Pan-American champion Guillermo Martinez 82.99.

“I knew that I'm in very good shape,” said Jarvenpaa, the runner-up in the Finnish championships. “So I tried to throw easy and relaxed.

"Actually the weather conditions were brilliant for me. I don't like to compete in the sunshine. So it was perfect.”

Osaka 2007 News Team/mb
1 Vadims Vasilevskis LAT 5 Jan 82 87.37 Q
2 Breaux Greer USA 19 Oct 76 86.78 Q
3 Tero Jarvenpaa FIN 2 Oct 84 84.35 Q
4 Magnus Arvidsson SWE 20 Feb 83 84.17 Q
5 Guillermo Martinez CUB 28 Jun 81 82.99 Q
6 Aleksandr Ivanov RUS 25 May 82 82.42 Q
7 Andreas Thorkildsen NOR 1 Apr 82 82.33 Q
8 Robert Oosthuizen RSA 23 Jan 87 82.06 Q
9 Igor Janik POL 18 Jan 83 80.83 q
10 Tero Pitkamaki FIN 19 Dec 82 80.62 q
11 Teemu Wirkkala FIN 14 Jan 84 79.82 q
12 Eriks Rags LAT 1 Jun 75 79.79 q
13 Peter Esenwein GER 7 Dec 67 79.62
14 Ainars Kovals LAT 21 Nov 81 79.42
15 Hardus Pienaar RSA 10 Aug 81 79.30
16 Igor Sukhomlinov RUS 13 Feb 77 79.05
17 Joshua Robinson AUS 4 Oct 85 78.48
18 Sergey Makarov RUS 19 Mar 73 78.22
19 Stuart Farquhar NZL 15 Mar 82 78.08
20 Qin Qiang CHN 18 Apr 83 77.71
21 Yukifumi Murakami JPN 23 Dec 79 77.63
22 Jarrod Bannister AUS 3 Oct 84 77.57
23 Scott Russell CAN 16 Jan 79 77.54
24 Andrus Varnik EST 27 Sep 77 75.96
25 Alexon Maximiano BRA 12 Oct 82 75.15
26 Pablo Pietrobelli ARG 24 Jun 80 74.81
27 Stephan Steding GER 29 Jan 82 74.61
28 Miroslav Guzdek CZE 3 Aug 75 74.13
29 Victor Fatecha PAR 10 Mar 88 73.55
30 Eric Brown USA 7 Jun 84 73.07
31 Stefan Muller SUI 20 Sep 79 71.48
32 Felix Loretz SUI 13 Nov 75 71.27
33 Gabriel Wallin SWE 14 Oct 81 70.61
34 Marko Janes EST 4 May 83 69.65
35 Csongor Oltean HUN 8 Apr 84 64.44
 
Group A 09:30 Team dist. 1. 2. 3.
1 Breaux Greer USA 86.78 64.49 79.67
2 Tero Jarvenpaa FIN 84.35 84.35
3 Magnus Arvidsson SWE 84.17 84.17
4 Andreas Thorkildsen NOR 82.33 X 82.33
5 Teemu Wirkkala FIN 79.82 75.52 X 79.82
6 Eriks Rags LAT 79.79 X X 79.79
7 Gerhardus Pienaar RSA 79.30 79.09 79.30 78.05
8 Igor Sukhomlinov RUS 79.05 79.05 74.83 X
9 Joshua Robinson AUS 78.48 75.11 76.93 78.48
10 Sergey Makarov RUS 78.22 78.22 77.71 74.42
11 Stuart Farquhar NZL 78.08 71.89 78.08 73.34
12 Pablo Pietrobelli ARG 74.81 72.36 74.81 74.60
13 Stephan Steding GER 74.61 67.32 X 74.61
14 Miroslav Guzdek CZE 74.13 74.13 72.41 69.43
15 Stefan Muller SUI 71.48 X 71.48 X
16 Marko Janes EST 69.65 X 68.64 69.65
17 Csongor Oltean HUN 64.44 X 64.44 X
Group B 11:30 Team dist. 1. 2. 3.
1 Vadims Vasilevskis LAT 87.37m X 72.80 87.37
2 Guillermo Martinez CUB 82.99m 82.99
3 Aleksandr Ivanov RUS 82.42m X 79.66 82.42
4 John Robert Oosthuizen RSA 82.06m X 82.06
5 Igor Janik POL 80.83m 80.83 77.61
6 Tero Pitkamaki FIN 80.62m 80.62 78.54 X
7 Peter Esenwein GER 79.62m 73.74 70.89 79.62
8 Ainars Kovals LAT 79.42m X 77.18 79.42
9 Qiang Qin CHN 77.71m 77.71 74.96 74.95
10 Yukifumi Murakami JPN 77.63m 70.23 77.63 75.73
11 Jarrod Bannister AUS 77.57m 77.57 X 77.44
12 Scott Russell CAN 77.54m 73.67 75.35 77.54
13 Andrus Varnik EST 75.96m X 75.96 X
14 Alexon Maximiano BRA 75.15m 68.89 70.57 75.15
15 Victor Fatecha PAR 73.55m 71.59 73.55 70.01
16 Eric Brown USA 73.07m 70.38 X 73.07
17 Felix Loretz SUI 71.27m 71.27 70.57 67.79
18 Gabriel Wallin SWE 70.61m X X 70.61

Group A 31 AUG 2007 09:30 

Order / LaneBibATHLETECOUNTRYPBSB 2007
1 1102 Breaux Greer USA USA 91.29 91.29
2 1012 Stefan Müller SUI SUI 82.07 79.43
3 872 Andreas Thorkildsen NOR NOR 91.59 89.49
4 524 Marko Jänes EST EST 78.50 76.74
5 800 Eriks Rags LAT LAT 86.47 83.35
6 671 Csongor Olteán HUN HUN 78.15 78.15
7 546 Tero Järvenpää FIN FIN 84.95 81.01
8 1024 Magnus Arvidsson SWE SWE 85.75 85.75
9 942 Gerhardus Pienaar RSA RSA 84.50 82.96
10 476 Miroslav Guzdek CZE CZE 85.74 78.32
11 959 Sergey Makarov RUS RUS 92.61 87.46
12 343 Joshua Robinson AUS AUS 80.73 80.73
13 979 Igor Sukhomlinov RUS RUS 83.34 83.34
14 554 Teemu Wirkkala FIN FIN 84.06 84.06
15 319 Pablo Pietrobelli ARG ARG 79.45 79.45
16 877 Stuart Farquhar NZL NZL 81.70 77.33
17 644 Stephan Steding GER GER 82.46 82.46

Group B 31 AUG 2007 11:00 

Order / LaneBibATHLETECOUNTRYPBSB 2007
1 400 Alexon Maximiano BRA BRA 78.57 78.57
2 429 Scott Russell CAN CAN 84.41 83.98
3 1010 Felix Loretz SUI SUI 78.56 78.38
4 1035 Gabriel Wallin SWE SWE 80.71 78.97
5 530 Andrus Värnik EST EST 87.83 72.30
6 749 Yukifumi Murakami JPN JPN 81.71 79.85
7 444 Qiang Qin CHN CHN 80.21 80.21
8 956 Aleksandr Ivanov RUS RUS 88.90 86.71
9 797 Ainars Kovals LAT LAT 85.95 82.23
10 883 Víctor Fatecha PAR PAR 78.01 78.01
11 941 John Robert Oosthuizen RSA RSA 83.33 83.33
12 803 Vadims Vasilevskis LAT LAT 90.73 90.73
13 1088 Eric Brown USA USA 78.12 73.85
14 618 Peter Esenwein GER GER 87.20 82.78
15 465 Guillermo Martínez CUB CUB 87.17 85.93
16 335 Jarrod Bannister AUS AUS 83.70 83.70
17 550 Tero Pitkämäki FIN FIN 91.53 91.23
18 892 Igor Janik POL POL 82.86 82.28

 

 

 

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