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2007 World Championships in Athletics Osaka, Japan

2007 11th IAAF World Championships - Osaka - Men's Long Jump

 

 

Host City: Osaka, Japan Format: Qualifying round (8.15 or top 12 to final) (Aug 29)
Dates: 24 August - 2 September 2007
Nations participating: 200
Athletes participating: 1,978
    Main venue: Nagai Stadium
Overview by IAAF    nagai stadium01
Reigning champion Phillips and Saladino – the only man over 8.50 in 2007 – were deemed the favourites. Phillips opened his defence with 8.30, to lead from Beckford (8.09) at the end of round one. Saladino, looking as though he was just making a safe jump, then matched the American with 8.30, and in the next round soared to 8.46. The only change prior to round six occurred with Howe’s 8.20 in round five to move into third. Round six saw Lukashevich reach 8.25 and dislodge Howe from bronze medal position. Three jumps later Howe used all of the board, and landed at 8.47 to take the lead amid hysterical celebrations including the ripping of his bib number. Phillips then also jumped 8.47 from take-off, but took off 25.2cm behind the plasticine, so was credited with only 8.22. Finally it was Saladino’s turn. Looking quicker than usual the Panamanian flew off the board and landed beyond 8.50 for a stirring victory, setting a South American record of 8.57 in the process. While four men had jumped further in World Championship history, none had produced a round six jump of that length to ensure victory
 The Men's Long Jump event at the 2007 World Championships took place on August 29, 2007 (qualification) and August 30, 2007 (final) at the Nagai Stadium in Osaka, Japan. There were a total number of 34 competing athletes from 25 countries.

Records

World Record  Mike Powell (USA) 8.95 Tokyo, Japan 30 August 1991
Championship Record
 
 
  Long Jump 30 August
  Final

Event Report: Men’s Long Jump Final

 

Irving Saldino made history as the first Panamanian World Champion and only the fifth ever gold medallist in the history of the event after a dramatic final round.

Saladino had led comfortably since the third round with 8.46m but Andrew Howe ignited a hitherto unremarkable final by moving from fourth to first with a sensational Italian record of 8.47m on his last jump.

The American-born Howe, the European champion, burst into a frenzy of excitement, whipped off his shirt and beat his chest in celebration as he, and virtually everyone else in the Nagai Stadium, assumed it would prove the gold medal-winning leap.

But in the final jump of the competition the cool-headed Saladino chose the perfect moment to better his own national record and snatch gold back with 8.57m. He joins the exclusive club of Carl Lewis, Mike Powell, Ivan Pedroso and Dwight Phillips as World men’s long jump champions.

Phillips was thwarted in his attempts to claim a hat-trick of world titles and the US athlete had to settle for bronze with 8.30m.

The gold medal is no less than Saldino deserved after dominating the world of long jumping for the past two seasons. Last year the Brazilian-based electrical engineering student won 15 out of 17 events and this year, discounting qualification, the Panamanian jumping Jack remains unbeaten.

The competition started modestly with only two 8.00m-plus jumps in the first round, coming from the two oldest athletes in the field. Jamaican James Beckford, competing in his sixth World Championship final, jumped 8.09 to take an early lead while Phillips let out a scream of delight as he took the first round lead with 8.30m.

By contrast Saladino rolled his eyes in frustration after a first round jump in the 8.50m range was ruled out by a red flag.

The quality of the competition moved up a notch in round two. Olexiy Lukashevych of Ukraine leapt into second with a season’s best 8.17m, although he was swiftly relegated to the lowest tier of the podium after Saladino found his form.

The Panamanian, who had looked a little sluggish during qualifying, soared out to 8.30cm – precisely the same distance as Phillips – although the shake of the hand from side to side suggested there was more to come.

Howe shifted up into fourth with 8.13m while Phillips could only respond to the Saladino threat with a foul.

Saladino took a clear lead with his third attempt, nailing 8.46m. He moved his thumb and fore finger apart to indicate the distance he thought he'd edged ahead of Phillips. With the tables now turned, Phillips appeared tense on the approach and the strain of chasing rather than leading started to tell as he committed a second successive foul.

South African Godfrey Mokoena, the longest qualifier, nudged Lukashevych out of bronze with an 8.19m leap.

An unremarkable round four witnessed no change in the medal order as the surviving eight jumpers almost took a breather. The only jump of significance came from Beckford, who catapulted into fourth with an 8.17m leap – his fourth successive eight-metre jump.

The penultimate round saw an increasingly competitive battle for bronze and only three centimetres separated third to sixth going into the last round. The consistent Beckford repeated his 8.17 distance before Howe crept ahead of Mokoena into bronze and raised an arm in celebration after being credited with 8.20m.

Lukashevych started the final round heroics by moving into bronze medal with a season’s best leap of 8.25m. But Howe was to ensure the Ukrainian’s night would end without precious metal.

Osaka 2007 News Team/sl

1 Irving Saladino PAN 23 Jan 83 8.57 0.0
2 Andrew Howe ITA 12 May 85 8.47 -0.2
3 Dwight Phillips USA 1 Oct 77 8.30 0.4
4 Oleksiy Lukashevych UKR 11 Jan 77 8.25 0.2
5 Godfrey Mokoena RSA 6 Mar 85 8.19 -0.1
6 James Beckford JAM 9 Jan 75 8.17 0.1
7 Ndiss Kaba Badji SEN 21 Sep 83 8.01 0.1
8 Ahmad Fayaz Marzouk KSA 6 Sep 79 7.98 0.0
9 Christian Reif GER 24 Oct 84 7.95 -0.4
10 Miguel Pate USA 13 Jun 79 7.94 -0.6
11 Hussein Taher Al-Sabee KSA 14 Nov 79 7.84 0.4
Trevell Quinley USA 16 Jan 83 NM
Final 20:40 Team dist. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.
1 Irving Saladino PAN 8.57m X 8.30 8.46 X X 8.57
2 Andrew Howe ITA 8.47m X 8.13 X 8.12 8.20 8.47
3 Dwight Phillips USA 8.30m 8.30 X X 8.02 X 8.22
4 Olexiy Lukashevych UKR 8.25m X 8.17 X 8.05 8.13 8.25
5 Godfrey Khotso Mokoena RSA 8.19m 7.98 7.86 8.19 8.18 8.15 8.19
6 James Beckford JAM 8.17m 8.09 8.03 8.00 8.17 8.17 X
7 Ndiss Kaba Badji SEN 8.01m 7.90 8.01 X 7.90 X 7.64
8 Ahmed Faiz Bin Marzouq KSA 7.98m X 7.98 7.70 X X
9 Christian Reif GER 7.95m 7.86 7.77 7.95
10 Miguel Pate USA 7.94m X 7.73 7.94
11 Hussein Taher Al-Sabee KSA 7.84m 7.71 7.30 7.84
- Trevell Quinley USA NM X X X
  Qualification 29 August

Event Report: Men’s Long Jump Qualification

Five men attained the automatic qualifying standard of 8.15m during a scratchy early morning qualification session in muggy, overcast conditions at the Nagai Stadium.

South African record-holder Godfrey Mokoena led the qualifiers for tomorrow night’s final with an impressive third leap of 8.28m in Pool B. The long-legged Commonwealth silver medallist put together a solid series, but required his final effort to cement his automatic qualifying position.

Defending champion Dwight Phillips enjoyed the kind of qualification he would have dreamed about last night. The American jumped 8.22m in Pool A with his first effort to comfortably secure his passage into tomorrow night’s final and keep alive his hopes of completing a golden hat-trick of World titles.

Veteran James Beckford, caught a favourable 2.3m/s tailwind with his third attempt to propel him to 8.22m and secure the Jamaican a place in his sixth World Championship final.

But unheralded German Christian Reif caused the biggest surprise of qualification, smashing his personal best by 0.11cm to make his way into the 12-strong final with a third round effort of 8.19m.

After a first round foul, ice cool European champion Andrew Howe of Italy broke the sand at 8.17m to prove he, too, could be a major factor in the final.

By contrast pre-event favourite Irving Saladino looked far from his rhythmic best during a sloppy qualification session. Maybe it was the early morning start which did not appeal but Saladino, unbeaten in 2007, committed two fouls, and although his second round effort of 8.11m was good enough to progress, he looked decidedly casual and will have to improve in the final if he is to become the first Panamanian World champion.

The big name qualification casualty was Walter Davis of the US, winner of the triple jump bronze on Monday, who committed three fouls and was eliminated.

Osaka 2007 News Team/sl

1 Godfrey Mokoena RSA 6 Mar 85 8.28 0.6 Q
2 James Beckford JAM 9 Jan 75 8,22 2.3
3 Dwight Phillips USA 1 Oct 77 8.22 -0.4 Q
4 Christian Reif GER 24 Oct 84 8.19 0.8 Q
5 Andrew Howe ITA 12 May 85 8.17 -0.3 Q
6 Irving Saladino PAN 23 Jan 83 8.13 -0.1 q
7 Ahmad Fayaz Marzouk KSA 6 Sep 79 8.12 0.5 q
8 Oleksiy Lukashevych UKR 11 Jan 77 8.11 0.3 q
9 Miguel Pate USA 13 Jun 79 8.10 0.7 q
10 Ndiss Kaba Badji SEN 21 Sep 83 8.04 -1.6 q
11 Hussein Taher Al-Sabee KSA 14 Nov 79 8.01 0.3 q
12 Trevell Quinley USA 16 Jan 83 7.99 0.5 q
13 Arnaud Casquette MRI 16 Apr 78 7.93 0.0
14 Marcin Starzak POL 20 Oct 85 7.92 1.2
15 Nikolai Atanasov BUL 11 Dec 74 7.89 0.1
16 Chris Tomlinson GBR 15 Sep 81 7.89 0.7
17 Issam Nima ALG 8 Apr 79 7.88 0.4
18 Mohamed Salman Al-Khuwalidi KSA 19 Jun 81 7.85 0.0
19 Ruslan Gataullin RUS 1 Dec 79 7.83 0.9
20 Gable Garenamotse BOT 30 Jun 79 7.77 0.1
21 Greg Rutherford GBR 17 Nov 86 7.77 1.1
22 Zhang Xiaoyi CHN 25 May 89 7.74 1.0
23 Rogerio Bispo BRA 16 Nov 85 7.74 -0.6
24 Yahya Berrabah MAR 13 Oct 81 7.72 1.4
25 Li Runrun CHN 24 Feb 83 7.66 0.2
26 Daisuke Arakawa JPN 19 Sep 81 7.62 0.8
27 Chris Noffke AUS 6 Jan 88 7.54 0.6
28 Morten Jensen DEN 2 Dec 82 7.53 0.6
29 Louis Tristan PER 1 May 84 7.51 -1.1
30 Hatem Mersal EGY 20 Jan 75 7.42 0.0
Walter Davis USA 2 Jul 79 NM
 
Group A 10:20 Team dist. 1. 2. 3.
1 Dwight Phillips USA 8.22m 8.22
2 Christian Reif GER 8.19m 7.95 7.44 8.19
3 Andrew Howe ITA 8.17m X 8.17
4 Irving Saladino PAN 8.13m X 8.13 X
5 Olexiy Lukashevych UKR 8.11m 8.11 X
6 Hussein Taher Al-Sabee KSA 8.01m 7.82 X 8.01
7 Trevelluinley USA 7.99m 6.03 7.65 7.99
8 Arnaud Casquette MRI 7.93m 7.65 7.93 7.73
9 Nikolay Atanasov BUL 7.89m 7.89 7.63 7.88
10 Christopher Tomlinson GBR 7.89m 7.89 7.80 7.64
11 Mohamed Salman Al Khuwalidi KSA 7.85m X 7.73 7.85
12 Rogerio Bispo BRA 7.74m X 5.63 7.74
13 Runrun Li CHN 7.66m 7.66 X 7.66
14 Daisuke Arakawa JPN 7.62m 7.62 X X
15 Morten Jensen DEN 7.53m X 7.53 X
16 Louis Tristan PER 7.51m 7.51 7.37 X
Group B 10:20 Team dist. 1. 2. 3.
1 Godfrey Khotso Mokoena RSA 8.28m 8.10 7.96 8.28
2 James Beckford JAM 8.22m 7.95 8.11 8.22
3 Ahmed Faiz Bin Marzouq KSA 8.12m 8.12 8.05 8.07
4 Miguel Pate USA 8.10m 8.10 7.84 X
5 Ndiss Kaba Badji SEN 8.04m 8.02 7.66 8.04
6 Marcin Starzak POL 7.92m 7.75 7.84 7.92
7 Issam Nima ALG 7.88m 7.88 X X
8 Ruslan Gataullin RUS 7.83m X 7.71 7.83
9 Gable Garenamotse BOT 7.77m 7.77 7.59 X
10 Greg Rutherford GBR 7.77m X 7.77 X
11 Xiaoyi Zhang CHN 7.74m X 7.67 7.74
12 Yahya Berrabah MAR 7.72m X X 7.72
13 Chris Noffke AUS 7.54m X 7.54 X
14 Hatem Mohamed Mersal EGY 7.42m 7.24 7.42 7.24
- Walter Davis USA NM X X X
- Nelson Evora POR DNS

Group A 29 AUG 2007 10:20 

Order / LaneBibATHLETECOUNTRYPBSB 2007
1 412 Nikolai Atanasov BUL BUL 8.31 8.16
2 696 Andrew Howe ITA ITA 8.41 8.30i
3 1073 Olexiy Lukashevych UKR UKR 8.27 8.11
4 882 Irving Saladino PAN PAN 8.56 8.53
5 438 Runrun Li CHN CHN 8.22 8.22
6 728 Daisuke Arakawa JPN JPN 8.06 7.90
7 607 Christopher Tomlinson GBR GBR 8.29 8.29
8 884 Louis Tristán PER PER 8.09 8.09
9 482 Morten Jensen DEN DEN 8.25 7.97i
10 642 Christian Reif GER GER 8.08 8.08
11 790 Hussein Taher Al-Sabee KSA KSA 8.35  
12 1130 Trevell Quinley USA USA 8.22 8.22
13 784 Mohamed Salman Al Khuwalidi KSA KSA 8.48 8.25
14 1129 Dwight Phillips USA USA 8.60 8.31
15 841 Arnaud Casquette MRI MRI 8.13 8.10
16 385 Rogério Bispo BRA BRA 8.21 8.17

Group B 29 AUG 2007 10:20 

Order / LaneBibATHLETECOUNTRYPBSB 2007
1 606 Greg Rutherford GBR GBR 8.26 7.96
2 791 Ahmed Faiz Bin Marzouq KSA KSA 8.39 8.03
3 985 Ndiss Kaba Badji SEN SEN 8.20 8.11
4 311 Issam Nima ALG ALG 8.26 8.26
5 1126 Miguel Pate USA USA 8.59i 8.24
6 447 Xiaoyi Zhang CHN CHN 8.17 8.09
7 1095 Walter Davis USA USA 8.36 8.24
8 937 Godfrey Khotso Mokoena RSA RSA 8.39 8.34
9 955 Ruslan Gataullin RUS RUS 8.29 8.29
10 383 Gable Garenamotse BOT BOT 8.27 8.18
11 707 James Beckford JAM JAM 8.62 8.37
12 496 Hatem Mohamed Mersal EGY EGY 8.31 7.85
13 812 Yahya Berrabah MAR MAR 8.33 7.40
14 910 Nelson Évora POR POR 8.10 8.10
15 341 Chris Noffke AUS AUS 8.12 8.12
16 906 Marcin Starzak POL POL 8.21 8.21

Event Preview: Men’s Long Jump

Irving Saladino starts firm favourite to become the first ever Panamanian world champion after boasting a flawless record from his seven competitions this year.

Saladino made a huge breakthrough in 2006, winning 15 competitions out of 17 and leaping a lifetime best of 8.56m to end the year as world No1. This season he has maintained the momentum, jumping 8.53m in Hengelo and in his last outing landing the Pan American title in Brazil.

With one of Saladino’s chief rivals, Louis Tsatoumas of Greece, absent with a back injury, few would bet against the Central American becoming only the fifth athlete to be crowned World long jump champion.

The man with a vested interest in keeping that figure to four is flamboyant American Dwight Phillips, who is seeking a hat-trick of World titles. He struck gold in the US championships in June, but has not yet rediscovered his old rhythm and his season’s best of 8.31m is some way short of his best.

The US challenge is bolstered by former basketball player Brian Johnson, a victor in Sheffield and Monaco this year, who has matched Phillips’ best mark of 8.31m.

Twice World silver medallist James Beckford is set for his sixth World Championship appearance but with a best of 8.37m the 32-year-old Jamaican cannot be discounted.

South African record-holder Godfrey Mokoena may be ten years Beckford’s junior but with a season’s best of 8.34m he is another who could feature in the medal shake up.

A European has never won this title but Italian Andrew Howe, 22, is hotly tipped to end the drought. The highly-rated American-born athlete, who is being advised by two-time former World long jump champion Carl Lewis, landed the European crown in Gothenburg last summer and with a personal best of 8.41m from last season he could threaten.

Chris Tomlinson set a British record of 8.29m in July and is another who could feature.

Osaka 2007 News Team/sl

 

 

 

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