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3. Olympic Games (Athletics) - Events

Olympic Events in Athletics - 100 metres (Women's)

100 metres (Women's)

 
First Gold Medalist
Betty Robinson
 USA Betty Robinson

Games: 21 games in 17 countries
First Held: 1928 Summer Games
Last Held: 2016 Summer Games

Participants: 831 from 175 countries
Top Athlete Medalist(s): JAM Merlene Ottey-Page and JAM Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce (3 medals)
Top Country Medalist(s): USA United States (18 medals)

100 meter Sprint for Women at Olympics

 
100 meter Sprint for Women at Olympics: Athletics has been held since the historical days as a part of the religious festivals. The 100 meter sprint is one of the oldest sports contested in the world. Traditionally, the 100 meter sprint is run on a straight running track. Often the race is started from an extended portion of the oval tracks to allow the athletes a straight line. The 100 meter sprint is the most prestigious event contested by the athletes all over the world. The leading athlete in the event is considered to be the fastest woman of the world. The 100 meter sprint for women in the international stages is administered by the International Association of Athletics Federations or IAAF.

100 meter Sprint for Women in Summer Olympics: The 100 meter sprint event was introduced to the women's athletics program at the 1928 Amsterdam Summer Games. Since then, the event has become a regular part of the Summer Games. The Olympic 100 meter sprint event has been dominated by the athletes from United States of America.

Rules for 100 meter Sprint for Women at Olympics: The International Association of Athletics Federations or IAAF is authorized to set rules for the track and field athletic events. The rules also applicable for the 100 meter sprint event for women at the international level are-

  • The length of the track and the width of each lane of the track are predetermined by the IAAF.
  • The radius of the outmost lane of the track cannot be more than 50 meter.
  • The records may be made only on the track made of such a substance, which allows runners to run with spiked shoes.
     
  • The time of the event has to be measured with a permitted automatic timing device.
  • The athlete is not given any credit if she does not finish the race.
  • Preliminary heat races are arranged, when the number of competitor is more than ten in the 100 meter sprint event. The winners or the top sprinters advance to the next round.
  • An athlete with two consecutive false starts is disqualified from the competition.
  • No athlete is permitted to run inside the inner curve of the track. Even stepping on the inner line of the track is not allowed.

    Medal Winners in the 100 meter Sprint for Women at Olympics: Florence Griffith-Joyner, Yulia Nesterenko, Marion Jones, Gail Devers, Evelyn Ashford, Lyudmila Kondratyeva, Annegret Richter, Renate Stecher, Wyomia Tyus, Wilma Rudolph, Betty Cuthbert, Marjorie Jackson, Fanny Blankers-Koen, Helen Stephens, Stanislawa Walasiewicz, Betty Robinson, Lauryn Williams, Ekaterini Thanou, Merlene Ottey, Juliet Cuthbert, Alice Brown, Inger Miller, Li Xuemei, Dawn Sowell, Ivet Lalova, Irina Privalova, Christine Arron and Veronica Campbell are some of the leading athletes in the domain of the 100 meter sprint event.

    Trivia: American athlete Florence Griffith-Joyner, also known as "Flo Jo", is the world record holder in the 100 meter sprint event. With her long hair, stunning look and long painted nails, she added a new color to the women's track events. In her words, "Looking good is almost as important as running well." During the 1960 Rome Summer Games, the winner of the 100 meter Olympic title, was given the nickname, "the black gazelle". In her childhood she was handicapped temporarily, affected by pneumonia and scarlet fever. At the age of thirty, Fanny Blankers-Koen won gold medal in the 100 meter event at the 1936 Berlin Olympics, one of her four titles in the Games. She was also called the "Flying Dutchwoman".
shelly ann fraser pryce 1250x750

Olympic history: Women’s 100m and 200m

A look back at the women’s 100m and 200m as Steve Smythe reflects on the history of events at the Olympics

1928-2012

The 100 metres debuted in 1928 in Amsterdam and Betty Robinson, a 16-year- old high school girl, won in a world record-equalling 12.2. She had only started running in March that year and in her second race and first outdoor race she had broken the world record!

A plane crash three years later, which left her unconscious for seven weeks, caused a knee injury which meant she couldn’t do sprint starts and could only run relays and she won a 4x100m gold in 1936.

Polish-born Stanislawa Walasiewicz, who was the first athlete to break 11 seconds for 100 yards, grew up in the USA but chose to compete for Poland in Los Angeles in 1932. She equalled the world record in all three of her races and won narrowly in 11.9 from Canadian Hilda Strike who shared the world record time.

When the Pole was 80 – and now known as Stella Walsh – she was shot dead in the USA with the autopsy revealing by current rules she was a man.

She won silver in 1936 in Berlin, beaten by world record-holder Helen Stephens.

Stephens bettered her 11.6 world record in all three races but all of them were wind assisted. She won the final in 11.5.

In 1948 in London the 200m was introduced into the Games and Fanny Blankers-Koen won a sprint double in 11.9 and 24.4 winning both races easily.

Marjorie Jackson was equally dominant in Helsinki in 1952, equalling the 100m world record with 11.5 and 23.7 200m. In the semi-finals, she had broken the world record with a 23.4.

There was another Australian double in Melbourne in 1956 with Liz Cuthbert winning with times of 11.5 and 23.4. All three medallists were in the same order in both events.

Wilma Rudolph, the 20th of her father’s 22 children, repeated the sprint double in Rome in 1960. The American equalled the world record of 11.3 in her semi and then ran a startling 11.0 with an illegal 2.7m/ sec wind. In the 200m, she ran an Olympic record of 23.2 in her heat but conditions were poor in the final where she clocked just 24.0.

Wyomia Tyus won the Tokyo 100m in 1964 in 11.4 after a world record equalling 11.2 heat. She didn’t contest the 200m final won by team-mate and silver medallist Edith McGuire in an Olympic record 23.0. However, she still achieved a unique double as she retained the 100m title in Mexico in a world record 11.08.

Irena Szewinska, who was third in the 100m, won the 200m to go one better than 1964 in a world record 22.58. The Pole was third in 1972 to complete her 200m medal set as gold went to Renate Stecher.

The East German broke the world record with 11.07 in her 100m and equalled the 200m with 22.40. Between 1970 and 1974, Stecher achieved a 90-race outdoor winning streak at 100m and 200m.

Stecher won two medals in Montreal 1976 but was beaten by Annegret Richter’s 11.08 and Barbel Eckert’s 23.37. East German Eckert defended her title in Moscow in 1980 with an Olympic record 22.03 in Moscow after Lyudmila Kondratyeva surprised at 100m.

Evelyn Ashford, fifth in 1976 but absent due to the boycott in 1980, returned as world record-holder in Los Angeles to win easily in 10.97. Valerie Brisco-Hooks, who scored a unique double having won the 400m, improved the Olympic record to 21.81 at 200m.

Florence Griffith-Joyner was second in 1984 but looked a different athlete in 1988 at Seoul. She won the 100m by three metres from Ashford in a superb but windy 10.54, while her 10.62 from her heat remains the Olympic record.

Her 200m was even more breath-taking. In the semi-finals, she improved Marita Koch’s world record to 21.56 and then destroyed it with a 21.34 final, winning by four metres from Grace Jackson’s 21.72.

The races in Barcelona and Atlanta in 1992 and 1996 were more competitive (see most memorable Olympics). In the 200m, Marie Jose Perec, who had won the 400m, was a surprise winner ahead of Merlene Ottey, who had been third in 1980 and 1984.

In Sydney in 2000, Marion Jones won a celebrated easy double in 10.75 and 21.84 but was stripped of the titles in 2007 and later jailed for lying to federal prosecutors. The 100m runner-up Ekaterina Thanou, who had drug allegations of her own to deal with in 2004, has not been upgraded to gold. Pauline Davis-Thompson of Bahamas did however get upgraded in the 200m.

There was a shock victory in the Athens 100m in 2004 for Belarus’s Yuliya Nesterenko and the bronze medallist there Veronica Campbell won the 200m. The Jamaican retained her title in 2008, again defeating favourite Felix in the 200m as Shelly-Ann Fraser won the 100m.

At London 2012, Felix finally won 200m gold and the now married Fraser-Pryce retained the 100m title but less decisively.

Most memorable Olympics: Barcelona 100m in 1992

The 100m in Spain was notable as just six hundredths of a second covered the top five athletes.

Gail Devers was primarily thought of as a hurdler and was eliminated from the hurdles semi-finals in 1988. She then suffered from Graves Disease which cost her two and a half years of training prior to Barcelona.

Off to a quick start, Devers battled with Russian Irina Privalova most of the way and edged clear. Juliet Cuthbert, Gwen Torrence and Merlene Ottey all closed on the second half and Devers won in 10.82 from Cuthbert’s 10.83.

Privalova won the bronze in 10.84. Torrence ran 10.86 and caused bad feeling among the others by saying two of the top three were on drugs.

Ottey ran 10.88 and was only fifth. Torrence did go on to win the 200m in Barcelona from Cuthbert and Ottey in 21.81 after a 21.72 semi-final. Devers beat Ottey and Torrence narrowly again in the Atlanta 100m in 10.94.

 

100 metres (Women's) History Year by Year (by IAAF) 1896 - 2012

 
 100w-1.JPG  100w-2.JPG
  
Amsterdam, 31 Jul 1928
(Competitors: 31; Countries: 13; Finalists: 6)

Finals

RankAthleteCountryTimeNotes
1 Betty Robinson United States 12.2 =WR
2 Bobbie Rosenfeld Canada 12.3  
3 Ethel Smith Canada 12.3  
4 Erna Steinberg Germany 12.4  
  Myrtle Cook Canada   DSQ
  Leni Schmidt Germany   DSQ
The favourites were Cook and Robinson, who had both run 12.0 earlier in the season; in Robinson’s case it was the first ever outdoor race the 16 year-old had run! Cook’s teammates Rosenfeld and Smith were fastest in the heats with 12.6, and Rosenfeld was again quickest in the next round with 12.4. The other semi-finals were taken by Robinson and Schmidt in 12.6. In the final, Cook false started twice, then burst into tears by the side of the track. Schmidt was ejected shortly after for the same offence. Unlike Cook, Schmidt’s reaction was one of anger rather than distress, and she shook her fist at the starter. Eventually the remaining four were off, with Steinberg fastest away, but quickly overtaken by Smith and Rosenfeld who held a slim lead to halfway, where Robinson caught the Canadians. The teenager edged Rosenfeld by about 30cm at the finish, with Smith half a metre behind.
Los Angeles, 2 Aug 1932
(Competitors: 20; Countries: 10; Finalists: 6)

inal

RankNameNationalityTimeNotes
1st, gold medalist(s) Stanisława Walasiewicz Poland 11.9 =WR
2nd, silver medalist(s) Hilda Strike Canada 11.9 =WR
3rd, bronze medalist(s) Wilhelmina von Bremen United States 12.0  
4 Marie Dollinger Germany 12.2  
5 Eileen Hiscock Great Britain 12.3  
6 Elizabeth Wilde United States 12.3  
Walasiewicz was born in Wierzschownia in Poland, but lived from the age of 18 months in the USA, choosing to compete for Poland in 1930 after competing in the 1928 US Trials and subsequently competed in the 1956 US Trials. Tollien Schuurman (NED) had run 11.9 twice in June, but Walasiewicz was fastest in the heats, equalling the world record with 11.9. Schuurman 12.2 and Dollinger 12.2 were next fastest in the heats. Strike won the first semi-final in 12.4 (12.38), but the surprise was Schuurman failing to make the final, being edged out by Dollinger and Wilde as all three also ran 12.4, with no more than 25cm covering the four women. Walasiewicz again ran 11.9, this time with a 3m advantage over Von Bremen. In the final, Von Bremen was on the inside with Strike two lanes out and Walasiewicz a further two lanes outside. Strike got the best start and Von Bremen was level with Walasiewicz just behind the Canadian. At 10m the Canadian led by a metre, and was 1.5m clear by halfway. Walasiewicz overtook Strike with 15m to go and won by just under half a metre. Both equalled the world record with 11.9, though only the semi-final 11.9 was ever ratified.
Berlin, 4 Aug 1936
(Competitors: 30; Countries: 15; Finalists: 6)

Final

RankNameNationalityTimeNotes
1st, gold medalist(s) Helen Stephens United States 11.5  
2nd, silver medalist(s) Stanisława Walasiewicz Poland 11.7  
3rd, bronze medalist(s) Käthe Krauß Germany 11.9  
4 Marie Dollinger Germany 12.0  
5 Annette Rogers United States 12.2  
6 Emmy Albus Germany 12.3  
Stephens, who was the biggest women’s sprint champion ever at 1.82/75kg, began to compete in 1935 and had 10 marks under 11.0/12.0 for 100y/100m that year. By the time of Berlin she had run 11.5 and a wind-assisted 11.3, while Walasiewicz had run 11.6 and 11.5w. Stephens was the only athlete under 12 seconds in the heats, running a startling 11.4, aided by a wind of 2.9. She returned to run 11.5w in the semi-finals, with Krauss (11.9) the only other athlete under 12.0. Stephens took the lead early on in the final, and won going away by 2m from Walasiewicz, with Krauss an equal margin behind the Pole. Stephens subsequently took a sex test after an accusation by a Polish journalist; an irony as Walasiewicz was found – in a post-mortem after being murdered as a bystander during a robbery – to have had hermaphroditic characteristics. Stephens finished her amateur running career in 1936, never having lost a race.
London, 2 Aug 1948
(Competitors: 38; Countries: 21; Finalists: 6)

Final

RankNameNationalityTime (hand)Notes
1st, gold medalist(s) Fanny Blankers-Koen Netherlands 11.9 =OR
2nd, silver medalist(s) Dorothy Manley Great Britain 12.2  
3rd, bronze medalist(s) Shirley Strickland Australia 12.2  
4 Viola Myers Canada 12.3 Est
5 Patricia Jones Canada 12.4 Est
6 Cynthia Thompson Jamaica 12.6 Est
By 1948 Blankers-Koen was 30 years old with 12 years international experience, and, having married her coach Jan Blankers in 1940, was a mother of two. She won her heat and semi-final in 12.0, with only Manley (12.1 in her heat) able to run under 12.4. In the final the tall and lithe (1.75/63Kg) Dutchwoman powered away from the field to win by 2m from “Dora” Manley. Strickland was a further 2m back, though the second and third placed runners were officially given the same time.
Helsinki, 22 Jul 1952
(Competitors: 56; Countries: 27; Finalists: 6)

Final

RankNameNationalityTime (hand)Notes
1st, gold medalist(s) Marjorie Jackson Australia 11.5 =WR
2nd, silver medalist(s) Daphne Robb-Hasenjäger Netherlands 11.8  
3rd, bronze medalist(s) Shirley Strickland Australia 11.9  
4 Winsome Cripps Australia 11.9  
5 Maria Sander Germany 12.0  
6 Mae Faggs United States 12.1
Blankers-Koen and Jackson were regarded as co-favourites for the gold. The Dutchwoman was suffering from a blood infection and competed only after penicillin injections. She won her heat in 11.9 (12.18) but Jackson was the most impressive with a 11.6 (11.86) heat which she bettered by 0.02 in the next round. Blankers-Koen qualified for the semi-finals, but did not start under doctor’s orders. Jackson won the semi in an unratified world record of 11.5 (11.72), and was more than 0.4 quicker than any other semi-finalist, a margin confirmed in the final by an even quicker run. Her winning margin of 0.38 was by far the largest in Olympic history, with Hasenjager edging Strickland and Cripps for silver. At the end of the season Jackson ran a world record of 11.4, and Blankers-Koen equalled her best of 11.5 after recovering from her illness and beat Strickland at the annual Berlin ISTAF meeting.
Melbourne, 26 Nov 1956
(Competitors: 34; Countries: 17; Finalists: 6)

Final

RankNameCountryResult
1st, gold medalist(s) Betty Cuthbert Australia 11.5
2nd, silver medalist(s) Christa Stubnick Germany 11.7
3rd, bronze medalist(s) Marlene Mathews-Willard Australia 11.7
4 Isabelle Daniels United States 11.8
5 Giuseppina Leone Italy 11.9
6 Heather Armitage Great Britain 12.0
Leone of Italy was fastest on the watch prior to the Games with 11.4, but Mathews and Cuthbert were more highly regarded. Mathews won her heat in 11.5 (11.81) with a slight following wind, while Cuthbert was fastest in the round with 11.4 (11.72) into a wind of 1.3. Mathews (11.6/11.80) and Stubnick (11.9/12.05) were semi-final winners, the German edging Cuthbert as they faced a breeze of 4.0. Two days later Cuthbert got a rocket start in the final and was never threatened, winning by a metre from Stubnick and Mathews, after being 2m ahead by halfway. Cuthbert’s time should probably have been listed as 11.6 based on the times of the five runners behind her.
Rome, 2 Sep 1960
(Competitors: 31; Countries: 19; Finalists: 6)

Final

Wind = 2.8 m/s.
Wind was over the allotted speed. All time in finals were wind assisted and do not count toward world or Olympic records.

RankNameNationalityTimeNotes
1st, gold medalist(s) Wilma Rudolph United States 11.18  
2nd, silver medalist(s) Dorothy Hyman Great Britain 11.43  
3rd, bronze medalist(s) Giuseppina Leone Italy 11.48  
4 Mariya Itkina Soviet Union 11.54  
5 Catherine Capdevielle France 11.64  
6 Jenny Smart Great Britain 11.72  
Wilma Rudolph clocked 11.5 in the first two rounds, while pre-race favourites Cuthbert and Mathews-Willard were both encumbered by injury problems, Cuthbert not making it past the quarter-finals. Rudolph equalled the world record with 11.3 (11.41) in the first semifinal, with Britain’s Hyman running 11.5 (11.65) in the other heat. Rudolph was sufficiently relaxed to fall asleep on a massage table 30 minutes before the final. She dominated the race, amazing and delighting onlookers with her elegance and power in sweeping to a 2.5m win in an unheard of 11.0 (11.18). Unfortunately the race was aided by a wind of 2.75, nullifying it for record purposes, but no-one watching was in any doubt that they had witnessed the fastest run ever by a woman. Hyman edged veteran Leone for second, with Maria Itkina, the all-round sprinter from the USSR, half a metre behind the Italian.
Tokyo, 16 Oct 1964
(Competitors: 44; Countries: 28; Finalists: 8)

Final

PlaceAthleteNationTime
1 Wyomia Tyus United States 11.4 seconds
2 Edith McGuire United States 11.6 seconds
3 Ewa Kłobukowska Poland 11.6 seconds
4 Marilyn White United States 11.6 seconds
5 Miguelina Cobián Cuba 11.7 seconds
6 Marilyn Black Australia 11.7 seconds
7 Halina Górecka Poland 11.8 seconds
8 Dorothy Hyman Great Britain 11.9 seconds
McGuire (11.47), the favourite, Kłobukowska (11.45) and Tyus (11.35w) were the most impressive heat winners. Tyus was best in the second round, clocking a startling 11.23, the fastest auto time ever, to crack Rudolph’s Olympic best. She confirmed her form next day with a 11.40-11.42 win over Kłobukowska in the semi-finals. Tyus was away quickly in the final, and her pick-up took her to an impregnable lead. She won by over a metre from McGuire, with Kłobukowska finishing quickly to overtake White for the bronze medal, thereby depriving the USA from achieving a clean sweep.
Mexico City, 15 Oct 1968
(Competitors: 40; Countries: 22; Finalists: 8)

Final

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1st, gold medalist(s) Wyomia Tyus United States 11.0 WR
2nd, silver medalist(s) Barbara Ferrell United States 11.1  
3rd, bronze medalist(s) Irena Szewińska Poland 11.1  
4 Raelene Boyle Australia 11.1 WJR
5 Margaret Bailes United States 11.3  
6 Dianne Bowering-Burge Australia 11.4  
7 Chi Cheng Republic of China 11.5  
8 Miguelina Cobián Cuba 11.6  
The beneficial effect of the altitude was felt in the first heat as Tyus equalled her own Olympic record with 11.2 (11.21). This was bettered in the first quarter-final by Ferrell, nominally the US third string, who equalled the world record of 11.1, running the fastest ever auto time of 11.11. Tyus then ran 11.0 (11.08w), and Europe’s best Szewińska also ran 11.1 (11.19). These two were the semi-final winners in a more modest 11.3, with rain deluging the second race. After false starts by Ferrell and Tyus, the final got away third time, with Tyus accelerating sharply away from the field. By 50m she was a metre ahead of Ferrell, and only Szewińska was able to dent the lead, gaining over a metre in the last 30m. She was unable to catch Ferrell, though she did edge the 17 year-old Boyle for third. The race was notable for the first Asian – Cheng – ever to qualify for a 100m final, but more so for Tyus, who not only set a world record of 11.0 (11.08) but also became the first Olympian (male or female) to successfully defend a 100m title.
Munich, 2 Sep 1972
(Competitors: 47; Countries: 33; Finalists: 8)

Final

RankNameNationalityLaneTimeNotes
1st, gold medalist(s) Renate Stecher East Germany 3 11.07 WR
2nd, silver medalist(s) Raelene Boyle Australia 1 11.23  
3rd, bronze medalist(s) Silvia Chivás Cuba 6 11.24  
4 Iris Davis United States 4 11.32  
5 Annegret Richter West Germany 2 11.38  
6 Alice Anum Ghana 8 11.41  
7 Barbara Ferrell United States 5 11.45  
8 Eva Lehocká Czechoslovakia 7 12.48  
Three sprinters – Stecher, Glesková and Ellen Stropahl (GDR) – had all run 11.0 during 1972. Stecher, the European Champion, was regarded as the athlete to beat, especially in the absence of Chi Cheng, who had run 11.0 (11.22) in 1970 but was injured in 1972. The 17 year-old Chivás was the most impressive runner during the first two rounds, clocking 11.18 and 11.22, while Stropahl failed to qualify for the semifinals. Stecher was an easy winner of the first semi-final in 11.18, and Boyle edged Chivás 11.32 to 11.33 in the other race. In the final the powerful German pulled away from Boyle and Chivás after 20m and won by a metre and a half from Boyle, who just edged Chivás. The time of 11.07 beat Tyus’s automatic best by 0.01, but when compared with the American’s altitude-assisted run, was probably worth a tenth better.
Montreal, 25 Jul 1976
(Competitors: 39; Countries: 22; Finalists: 8)

Final

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1st, gold medalist(s) Annegret Richter West Germany 11.08  
2nd, silver medalist(s) Renate Stecher East Germany 11.13  
3rd, bronze medalist(s) Inge Helten West Germany 11.17  
4 Raelene Boyle Australia 11.23  
5 Evelyn Ashford United States 11.24  
6 Chandra Cheeseborough United States 11.31  
7 Andrea Lynch Great Britain 11.32  
8 Marlies Oelsner East Germany 11.34  
Stecher was favourite, although her seasonal best was slower than that of her West German counterparts – Helten, who had run a world record 11.04, and Richter, author of a 10.8 run a month before Montreal. Richter was the fastest heat winner, running 11.19 ahead of Stecher (11.21), and the West German then ran a startling 11.05, second fastest ever, with Helten (11.20) and Stecher (11.22) the next fastest quarterfinal winners. The next day Richter went one better, powering to a 2m win over the smooth running US teenager Ashford in a world record of 11.01. Stecher won the other semi-final in 11.10 ahead of Helten (11.18) and Boyle (11.22), the Australian becoming the first woman to reach three Olympic 100m finals. The big three were level until 50m in the final, when Richter pulled away to win by half a metre from the defending champion, with Helten a further half-metre behind. Boyle finished fastest of all in the last 15m to take fourth for the second time, just edging Ashford.
Moscow, 26 Jul 1980
(Competitors: 40; Countries: 25; Finalists: 8)

Final

  • Held on Saturday July 26, 1980
RANKFINALTIME
Med 1.png  Lyudmila Kondratyeva (URS) 11.06
Med 2.png  Marlies Göhr (GDR) 11.07
Med 3.png  Ingrid Auerswald (GDR) 11.14
4.  Linda Haglund (SWE) 11.16
5.  Romy Müller (GDR) 11.16
6.  Kathy Smallwood-Cook (GBR) 11.28
7.  Chantal Réga (FRA) 11.32
8.  Heather Hunte-Oakes (GBR) 11.34
Although Kondratyeva ran a disputed 10.87 in June in Leningrad, Göhr, the European Champion and world record holder at 10.88, was favourite, especially as the US-led boycott had kept out the 1979 world number one Evelyn Ashford. However, it was the Russian was fastest in each of the preliminary rounds, with 11.13, 11.06 and 11.11, beating Göhr (11.18) in the semifinal, after Göhr and Auerswald had run 11.12 quarter-finals. In the final Haglund and Kondratyeva were off quickest, with Göhr slowed by shaky starting blocks. The Swede led at halfway, with Kondratyeva second, gritting her teeth at a hamstring twinge. As Haglund faded, Göhr moved to the front and Kondratyeva found a burst of speed in the last 15m to overhaul Göhr at the line. Limping after the race, Kondratyeva had to withdraw from the 200m and relay. The other GDR sprinters had swooped on Haglund, with Auerswald passing her in the last few metres for the bronze medal. In 2004, Kondrayeva’s gold medal went up for sale on eBay for $3000.
Los Angeles, 5 Aug 1984
(Competitors: 46; Countries: 33; Finalists: 8)

Final

RANKFINALTIME
Med 1.png  Evelyn Ashford (USA) 10.97 (OR)
Med 2.png  Alice Brown (USA) 11.13
Med 3.png  Merlene Ottey-Page (JAM) 11.16
4.  Jeanette Bolden (USA) 11.25
5.  Grace Jackson (JAM) 11.39
6.  Angela Bailey (CAN) 11.40
7.  Heather Oakes (GBR) 11.43
8.  Angella Taylor (CAN) 11.62
Ashford missed the 1980 Olympics because of the boycott, and was injured during that season, an occurrence which repeated itself during her duel with Göhr in the 1983 World Championships. After injuring herself at the US Trials Ashford was not a certainty to win, even without the GDR sprinters. Ashford was fastest in the heats (11.06) and semi-finals, beating Ottey 11.03 to 11.17. In the final the diminutive (1.58/59Kg) Brown was away quickest, but Ashford and Bolden caught her at 20m, and Ottey pulled level with Bolden at halfway. Ashford surged away, and crossed the line in splendid isolation 1.5m to the good, with Brown just holding off Ottey. Two weeks later Ashford and Göhr met in Zürich, with the American setting a world record of 10.76 ahead of Göhr’s 10.84.
Seoul, 25 Sep 1988
(Competitors: 64; Countries: 42; Finalists: 8)

Final

Wind+3.0

RANKFINALTIME
Med 1.png  Florence Griffith-Joyner (USA) 10.54w
Med 2.png  Evelyn Ashford (USA) 10.83w
Med 3.png  Heike Drechsler (GDR) 10.85w
4.  Grace Jackson (JAM) 10.97w
5.  Gwen Torrence (USA) 10.97w
6.  Natalia Pomoshchnikova (URS) 11.00w
7.  Juliet Cuthbert (JAM) 11.26w
8.  Anelia Nuneva (BUL) 11.49w
Griffith Joyner had developed, at the age of 28, from being a top sprinter in 1987 capable of 10.90-11.00 on her best days, to 10.60-10.70 in 1988. She ran an unbelievable 10.49 in the US Trials, which was ratified as a world record although felt by many to be wind-assisted. Nevertheless, she had the next-fastest run, 10.61, and was considered unbeatable for Seoul. She duly set an Olympic record in the heats with 10.88, which Ashford equalled in the second round. In the next race “Flo-Jo” ran 10.62, beating Cuthbert and 1980 winner Kondratyeva by 4m. Ashford (10.99) and Griffith Joyner (10.70w) won their semifinals. The final saw Flo-Jo superior in every department. Her reaction time was the quickest at 0.131 seconds, and by 40m she was threatened only by Nuneva, who was 0.02 seconds behind. Nuneva (who was confusingly listed under her unfamiliar married name of Vechernikova) pulled a muscle just before 80m, and hobbled across the line in last place. Up ahead, Griffith Joyner had switched gears at 60m, and her advantage of 0.12 seconds at 60m more than doubled in the next 30m to 0.26 seconds. With a high knee lift and a long stride which made her look almost as though she was prancing Flo-Jo was unlike any other woman sprinter before or since. A huge smile creased her face for the last 20m of the race, and she crossed the line with her 48th stride of the race nearly 3m ahead of Ashford, who got away from Drechsler in the last 15m.
Barcelona, 1 Aug 1992
(Competitors: 54; Countries: 41; Finalists: 8)

Final

RANKFINALTIME
Med 1.png  Gail Devers (USA) 10.82
Med 2.png  Juliet Cuthbert (JAM) 10.83
Med 3.png  Irina Privalova (EUN) 10.84
4.  Gwen Torrence (USA) 10.85
5.  Merlene Ottey (JAM) 10.88
6.  Anelia Nuneva (BUL) 11.10
7.  Mary Onyali (NGR) 11.15
8.  Liliana Allen (CUB) 11.19
With World Champion Katrin Krabbe (GDR) disqualified for drug abuse, there was no clear favourite. Cuthbert ran the fastest heat (11.14) and improved to 11.12 in the second round, which remained the fastest until the last quarter-final when Privalova ran 10.98 into a 1.1 wind. Cuthbert won her semi-final in 10.98 by more than a metre from Devers (11.12), and Torrence won the other heat in 11.02 into a very strong (2.9) wind. Behind her Ottey (11.07) finished quickly to pass Privalova (11.08) just before the line. The Russian was away best in the final, and maintained a slim lead until 80m, but at that point there were five possible winners, as Torrence, Devers and Cuthbert were virtually even with Privalova, and fast-finishing Ottey was no more than 30cm behind. The picture was no clearer as the five flashed over the line, with a wait of five minutes before the result was announced. The time would have been around 10.70 had the wind blown in the opposite direction.
Atlanta, 27 Jul 1996
(Competitors: 56; Countries: 38; Finalists: 8)

Final

  • Held on July 27, 1996
RANKFINALTIME
Med 1.png  Gail Devers (USA) 10.94
Med 2.png  Merlene Ottey (JAM) 10.94
Med 3.png  Gwen Torrence (USA) 10.96
4.  Chandra Sturrup (BAH) 11.00
5.  Marina Trandenkova (RUS) 11.06
6.  Natalya Voronova (RUS) 11.10
7.  Mary Onyali (NGR) 11.13
8.  Zhanna Pintusevich (UKR) 11.14
Devers was fastest in the first two rounds with the only sub-11 clockings, 10.92 then 10.94. In the first semi-final Ottey took an early lead and edged Torrence 10.93 to 10.97, while Devers won the second race in 11.00, with Cuthbert missing out on the final despite running 11.07. Voronova had the quickest reaction to the gun in the final, but Devers quickly took the lead with Ottey and Torrence just behind. The Jamaican caught the reigning champion at 60m, but Devers fought back, and the two went through the line together, with Torrence perhaps 15cm behind. Sturrup was an unheralded fourth just behind Torrence. The winning margin was deemed to be 0.005, approximately 5cm, and was a re-run of the 1993 World Championships, where Devers also won from Ottey by just one thousandth. Six years earlier, Devers had been diagnosed as suffering from Graves’ disease, which affects the thyroid gland, and at one point was in danger of having a foot amputated.
Sydney, 23 Sep 2000
(Competitors: 84; Countries: 63; Finalists: 8)

Final

Heat 1 of 1
Date: Saturday 23 September 2000
PlaceAthleteNationLaneReactionTimeRecord
2 Ekaterini Thanou Greece 4 0.206 11.12  
2 Tayna Lawrence Jamaica 1 0.163 11.18  
3 Merlene Ottey Jamaica 3 0.179 11.19  
4 Zhanna Pintusevych Ukraine 7 0.223 11.20  
5 Chandra Sturrup Bahamas 6 0.193 11.21  
6 Sevatheda Fynes Bahamas 8 0.253 11.22  
7 Debbie Ferguson Bahamas 2 0.238 11.29  
DSQ Marion Jones United States 5 0.189 10.75 SB
Jones came to Sydney unbeaten all year, but with the pressure of attempting to win five gold medals and dealing with the recent drugs disqualification of her then husband CJ Hunter. Showing a chilling level of focus considering the circumstances, she erupted to a 10.83 clocking in the second round, finishing almost 2m clear of Thánou, one of her most serious opponents. The following day, Jones won her semifinal in 11.01 (-1.1) from Thánou (11.10), while Ottey, in her fifth Olympic Games and aged 40, won the other heat in 11.22 (-0.5). Jones took the lead at the 25m mark in the final and overwhelmed the opposition, winning by 4m. Behind her, Thánou took silver, while Lawrence edged out Ottey on the line by 0.01 for the bronze medal. The apparent margin of victory of 0.37 was the second largest-ever after Marjorie Jackson’s 0.38 in 1952. It was Jones’s most comprehensive win of her 11 finals in 2000, and the first of three golds and five medals won by her in Sydney. In October 2007, Marion Jones confessed to doping violations dating back to just before the 2000 Olympic Games. The following month, the IAAF Council annulled all of her results since September 1, 2000. In December 2007, the IOC Executive Board decided to disqualify Jones from all events in which she had competed at the 2000 Games. No appeal was filed by Jones against this decision, indeed she returned all five of her Sydney medals. The IOC requested that the IAAF “postpone any further adjustment of results until further notice.” IOC President Jacques Rogge had in the meantime explained “This is not going to be merely an automatic upgrade. Every potentially upgraded athlete will be scrutinised on her merit. We want to upgrade athletes that we know are absolutely clean.” It was not until December 2009 that the IOC Executive Board reallocated Jones’s individual medals. Her 200m gold and long jump bronze went to those women who finished directly behind her, but this was not the case for the 100m where the runner-up was Thánou, who by then had served a two-year doping suspension to 2006. The IOC spokesman Mark Adams explained that Thanou “disgraced herself and the Olympic movement by avoiding three doping tests ... she admitted anti-doping violations when she accepted a two-year suspension from the IAAF. The rankings in the actual race are a matter for the IAAF, and they are changed, but the actual awarding of any medal is not a right. Therefore, in this case, it will not happen. It is felt that with her conduct, she did not deserve to be honoured with this recognition.” Therefore, though Thanou effectively won the race, her reward remained the silver she originally won behind Jones. The Jamaicans Lawrence and Ottey were however elevated to silver and bronze. Which means that the title of 2000 Olympic 100m Champion is vacant, there are two silver medallists, and Ottey’s total of Olympic medals rises to a women’s record total of nine.
Athens, 21 Aug 2004
(Competitors: 63; Countries: 52; Finalists: 8)

Final

Wind: −0.1 m/s

RankLaneNameNationalityReactionResultNotes
1st, gold medalist(s) 6 Yulia Nestsiarenka Belarus 0.186 10.93  
2nd, silver medalist(s) 4 Lauryn Williams United States 0.212 10.96 PB
3rd, bronze medalist(s) 3 Veronica Campbell Jamaica 0.199 10.97  
4 1 Ivet Lalova Bulgaria 0.154 11.00  
5 2 Aleen Bailey Jamaica 0.208 11.05  
6 5 Sherone Simpson Jamaica 0.164 11.07  
7 8 Debbie Ferguson Bahamas 0.177 11.16  
8 7 LaTasha Colander United States 0.183 11.18  
The surprise of the heats was Nesterenko, whose national record 10.94 was a full two tenths faster than the next best time, by race favourite Arron, and 44 year-old Ottey, who was now representing Slovenia. Arron (11.10), NCAA champion Williams (11.03), Simpson (11.09) and Nesterenko (10.99) were the quarter-finals winners. Nesterenko continued her consistent running in the semis, edging Campbell 10.92 to 10.93, with Lalova and Ferguson both running 11.04 to easily eliminate Arron and former champion Devers. The other semi saw Williams win in 11.01, with US Trials winner Colander just edging Ottey 11.18 to 11.21 for the last qualifying place. Only Bailey of the finalists had also been in the top eight in the 2003 World Championships. Lalova reacted quickest in the final, but was quickly caught by Williams (the slowest reactor), who led the race until 80m, when Nesterenko powered by to win by 30cm. Williams just edged Campbell for the silver. The Belarussian had become the first athlete to run windlegal sub-11 in all four rounds of a major championship (though Griffith Joyner had averaged 10.685 in 1988 with an average wind reading of +1.9).
Beijing, 17 Aug 2008
(Competitors: 85; Countries: 71; Finalists: 8)

Final

RankAthleteCountryReactionTimeNotes
1st, gold medalist(s) Shelly-Ann Fraser Jamaica 0.190 10.78 PB
2nd, silver medalist(s) Sherone Simpson Jamaica 0.155 10.98  
Kerron Stewart Jamaica 0.232  
4 Lauryn Williams United States 0.149 11.03  
5 Muna Lee United States 0.234 11.07  
6 Jeanette Kwakye Great Britain 0.161 11.14 PB
7 Debbie Ferguson Bahamas 0.167 11.19  
8 Torri Edwards United States 0.179 11.20  
This was expected to be a USA-Jamaica battle. On June 28 Lee (10.85) had won the US Trials from Edwards and Williams (both 10.90), while on the same day at the Jamaican Championships, World Champion Veronica Campbell-Brown had run 10.88 in fourth place, kept out of the Olympic team by Stewart (10.80), Fraser (10.85) and Simpson (10.87). Nigeria’s Damola Osayomi was fastest in the heats with 11.13. Ominously, all three Jamaicans won their quarter-finals, with Stewart (10.98) the fastest of the day. Fraser (11.00) won the first semi-final from Lee (11.07), with veteran Chandra Sturrup the fastest eliminated athlete at 11.22. The smooth-striding Stewart took the other semi-final easily in 11.05 from Edwards (11.18), with Strurrup’s teammate Ferguson McKenzie qualifying for her third consecutive final. In the final, Williams and Fraser were the quickest into their running. Edwards was not, as she visibly twitched in the set position and thought she would be called for a false start. This later formed the basis of a dismissed US protest, as Edwards had been quicker into her running than her teammate Lee, who, with Stewart, had a very sloth-like reaction to the gun. Fraser dominated the race, quickly breaking clear of Simpson, and edging further away with each deceptively long stride. Stewart closed very quickly, catching Simpson on the line to tie for second place, a full two metres behind. The relatively small (160/52Kg) Fraser had improved more than half a second in 2008 (from 11.31) to dominate the final, with Jamaica gaining the first-ever clean sweep in the event.
London, 4 Aug 2012
(Competitors: 79; Countries: 68; Finalists: 8)

Final

RankLaneNameNationTimeNotes
1st, gold medalist(s) 7 Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce Jamaica 10.75  
2nd, silver medalist(s) 5 Carmelita Jeter United States 10.78 SB
3rd, bronze medalist(s) 4 Veronica Campbell-Brown Jamaica 10.81 SB
4 9 Tianna Madison United States 10.85 PB
5 8 Allyson Felix United States 10.89 PB
6 2 Kelly-Ann Baptiste Trinidad and Tobago 10.94  
7 3 Murielle Ahoure Ivory Coast 11.00  
8 6 Blessing Okagbare Nigeria 11.01  
  Wind: +1.5 m/s
Five of the seven heats were won with sub-11 marks, the best of which was Jeter’s powerful and controlled 10.83. The two slowest heats were won by the most relaxed looking sprinters – Felix (11.01w) and reigning champion Fraser-Pryce (11.00). Jeter repeated her 10.83 in the
semi-finals beating Campbell-Brown (10.89), and was again the fastest, but Fraser-Pryce’s 10.85 in the second semi-final was more impressive as the Jamaican eased up over the last 15m. Okagbare won the last semi, moving from fifth at 50m to pip Madison at the tape, both running 10.92.
Fraser-Pryce and Jeter had exactly the same reaction time in thefinal, the difference being that the Jamaican was much more quickly into her running thereafter. At 10m Fraser-Pryce led alongside the fast reacting Baptiste, with Jeter 30cm back in fifth. Fraser went clear of the field at halfway, and Jeter moved into second just after the 60m point, with Campbell-Brown just behind her. Fraser held off Jeter to win by a third of a metre, with similar margins stretching from Jeter in second to fifth-placed Felix.
 Rio de Janeiro, 13 Aug 2016
 (Athletes: 80; Countries: 56, Finalists: 8)

Final

RankLaneNameNationalityReactionResultNotes
1st place, gold medalist(s) 4 Elaine Thompson  Jamaica 0.157 10.71  
2nd place, silver medalist(s) 5 Tori Bowie  United States 0.112 10.83  
3rd place, bronze medalist(s) 6 Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce  Jamaica 0.138 10.86 SB
4 3 Marie-Josee Ta Lou  Ivory Coast 0.136 10.86 PB
5 9 Dafne Schippers  Netherlands 0.134 10.90  
6 8 Michelle-Lee Ahye  Trinidad and Tobago 0.132 10.92  
7 7 English Gardner  United States 0.148 10.94  
8 2 Christania Williams  Jamaica 0.163 11.80  
  Wind: +0.5 m/s
 

Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce was the defending Olympic champion from 2012 and entered the competition having won five of the last six global championships. At eighth in the year's rankings, she was not in peak form resulting from her toe injury. Elaine Thompson had beaten her at the Jamaican Championships with a world-leading and national record-equalling 10.70 seconds. American champion English Gardner was the next fastest and the two other American entrants, Tianna Bartoletta and Tori Bowie, shared third on the world rankings with African record breaker Murielle Ahouré at 10.78 seconds. Dutchwoman Dafne Schippers was also a strong entrant.

Charlotte Wingfield of Malta was comfortably the fastest qualifier in the preliminaries at 11.86 seconds. Cecilia Bouele of Congo was the only other athlete under 12 seconds in that round. In the first round proper Fraser-Pryce demonstrated her form with 10.96 seconds to top qualifying. Trinidad and Tobago's Michelle-Lee Ahye was the next fastest heat winner in eleven seconds dead, while all the top runners progressed. The semi-final round excised Murielle Ahoure and Tianna Bartoletta. Earlier in the season, both had run 10.78 and are tied for the fourteenth-fastest in history. Fraser-Pryce and Thompson were the fastest in 10.88 but only eight hundredths separated the finalists.

In the final, Tori Bowie reacted the fastest, but Elaine Thompson got the best start. Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce has previously gained the edge from her exceptional start, but at best she was even with Thompson, which Thompson expanded upon for the win. For her fast reaction, Bowie was a step behind in the early stages of the race but made a late rush to catch Fraser-Pryce just before the line for silver. After an injured toe during most of the season, it was Fraser-Pryce's season best for bronze.[6] Thompson's time 10.71 would have been good enough to be the fifth time in history, had she not already run 10.70 at the Jamaican Olympic Trials earlier in the season to tie Fraser-Pryce for fourth.

The medals were presented by Nawal El Moutawakel, IOC member, Morocco and Frankie Fredericks, Council Member of the IAAF.

 

100 metres (Women's) Progression of Olympic Record

  
Women
100 metres
13.0   h1     Anni Holdmann   GER Amsterdam 1928
12,8   h2     Erna Steinberg   GER Amsterdam 1928
12,8   h3     Kinue Hitomi   JPN Amsterdam 1928
12,8   h4     Leni Junker   GER Amsterdam 1928
12,8   h6     Leni Schmidt   GER Amsterdam 1928
12,6   h7     Fanny Rosenfeld   CAN Amsterdam 1928
12,6   h9     Ethel Smith   CAN Amsterdam 1928
12,4   s1     Fanny Rosenfeld   CAN Amsterdam 1928
12,4   s2     Betty Robinson   USA Amsterdam 1928
12,2   1   WR Betty Robinson   USA Amsterdam 1928
12,2   h1     Marie Dollinger   GER Los Angeles 1932
11.9*   h2   WR Stanisława Walasiewicz   POL Los Angeles 1932
11.9*   s2   =WR Stanisława Walasiewicz   POL Los Angeles 1932
11.9*   1   =WR Stanisława Walasiewicz   POL Los Angeles 1932
11,9   2   =WR Hilda Strike   CAN Los Angeles 1932
[11.4w]   h2     Helen Stephens   USA Berlin 1936
[11.5w]   s1     Helen Stephens   USA Berlin 1936
[11.5w]   1     Helen Stephens   USA Berlin 1936
11,9   1     Fanny Blankers-Koen   NED London 1948
11,9 12,18 h7 <2.0   Cathy Hardy   USA Helsinki 1952
11,6 11,86 h8 <2.0   Marjorie Jackson   AUS Helsinki 1952
11,6 11,84 q1 <2.0   Marjorie Jackson   AUS Helsinki 1952
11,5 11,75 s1 <2.0 =WR Marjorie Jackson   AUS Helsinki 1952
11,5 11,67 1 +1.7 =WR Marjorie Jackson   AUS Helsinki 1952
11,5 [11.81] h2 +0.6   Marlene Mathews   AUS Melbourne 1956
11,4 [11.72] h3 -1,2   Betty Cuthbert   AUS Melbourne 1956
11,3 11,41 s1 +0.8 =WR Wilma Rudolph   USA Rome 1960
[11.0w] {11.18w} 1 +2.8   Wilma Rudolph   USA Rome 1960
11,2 11,23 q1 +0.3 =WR Wyomia Tyus   USA Tokyo 1964
11.2A 11.21A h1 0   Wyomia Tyus   USA Mexico City 1968
11.2A [11.30A] h2 +1.3   Margaret Bailes   USA Mexico City 1968
11.2A [11.28A] h6 0   Barbara Ferrell   USA Mexico City 1968
11.1A 11.12A q1 +0.6 =WR Barbara Ferrell   USA Mexico City 1968
[11.0Aw] {11.08Aw} q2 2,7   Wyomia Tyus   USA Mexico City 1968
11.1A [11.20A] q4 +1.8 =WR Irena Szewińska-Kirszenstein   POL Mexico City 1968
11.0A 11.08A 1 +1.2 WR Wyomia Tyus   USA Mexico City 1968
  11,07 1 -0,2 WR Renate Stecher   GDR Munich 1972
  11,05 q1 +1.1   Annegret Richter   FRG Montréal 1976
  11,01 s1 +0.6 WR Annegret Richter   FRG Montréal 1976
  10,97 1 -1,2   Evelyn Ashford   USA Los Angeles 1984
  10,88 h7 +1.0   Florence Griffith Joyner   USA Seoul 1988
  10,88 q2 +1.6   Evelyn Ashford   USA Seoul 1988
  10,62 q3 +1.0   Florence Griffith Joyner   USA Seoul 1988
  [10.54w] 1 +3.0   Florence Griffith Joyner   USA Seoul 1988
*Né Stefan Walasiewicz, Stanisława Walasiewicz competed as a woman for many years. After her death in 1983, it was discovered that
she was a gynandromorph, i.e., possessing internal sexual characteristics of both sexes. This does not necessarily imply that she would have failed the IOC sex testing, after it was introduced.
Low-Altitude Progression
11,2 11,23 q1 +0.3 =WR Wyomia Tyus   USA Tokyo 1964
  11,18 h1 -0,8   Silvia Chivás   CUB Munich 1972
  11,18 s1 -0,3   Renate Stecher   GDR Munich 1972
  11,07 1 -0,2   Renate Stecher   GDR Munich 1972
  11,05 q1 +1.1   Annegret Richter   FRG Montréal 1976
  11,01 s1 +0.6 WR Annegret Richter   FRG Montréal 1976
  10,97 1 -1,2   Evelyn Ashford   USA Los Angeles 1984
  10,88 h7 +1.0   Florence Griffith Joyner   USA Seoul 1988
  10,88 q2 +1.6   Evelyn Ashford   USA Seoul 1988
  10,62 q3 +1.0   Florence Griffith Joyner   USA Seoul 1988
  [10.54w] 1 +3.0   Florence Griffith Joyner   USA Seoul 1988
Automatic Timing Progression
  12,18 h1 <2.0 WRa Winsome Cripps   AUS Helsinki 1952
  12,18 h7 <2.0 WRa Cathy Hardy   USA Helsinki 1952
  11,86 h8 <2.0 WRa Marjorie Jackson   AUS Helsinki 1952
  11,84 q1 <2.0 WRa Marjorie Jackson   AUS Helsinki 1952
  11,75 s1 <2.0 WRa Marjorie Jackson   AUS Helsinki 1952
  11,67 1 +1.7 WRa Marjorie Jackson   AUS Helsinki 1952
  11,65 h6 0 WRa Wilma Rudolph   USA Rome 1960
  11,41 s1 +0.8 WRa Wilma Rudolph   USA Rome 1960
  [11.18w] 1 +2.8   Wilma Rudolph   USA Rome 1960
  11,23 q1 +0.3 WRa Wyomia Tyus   USA Tokyo 1964
  11.21A h1 0 WRa Wyomia Tyus   USA Mexico City 1968
  11.12A q1 +0.6 WRa Barbara Ferrell   USA Mexico City 1968
  [11.08Aw] q2 +2.7   Wyomia Tyus   USA Mexico City 1968
  11.08A 1 +1.2 WRa Wyomia Tyus   USA Mexico City 1968
  11,07 1 -0,2 WRa Renate Stecher   GDR Munich 1972
  11,05 q1 +1.1   Annegret Richter   FRG Montréal 1976
  11,01 s1 +0.6 WRa Annegret Richter   FRG Montréal 1976
  10,97 1 -1,2   Evelyn Ashford   USA Los Angeles 1984
  10,88 h7 +1.0   Florence Griffith Joyner   USA Seoul 1988
  10,88 q2 +1.6   Evelyn Ashford   USA Seoul 1988
  10,62 q3 +1.0   Florence Griffith Joyner   USA Seoul 1988
  [10.54w] 1 +3.0   Florence Griffith Joyner   USA Seoul 1988
Low-Altitude Automatic Timing Progression
  11,23 q1 +0.3 =WR Wyomia Tyus   USA Tokyo 1964
  11,18 h1 -0,8   Silvia Chivás   CUB Munich 1972
  11,18 s1 -0,3   Renate Stecher   GDR Munich 1972
  11,07 1 -0,2 =WR Renate Stecher   GDR Munich 1972
  11,05 q1 +1.1   Annegret Richter   FRG Montréal 1976
  11,01 s1 +0.6 WR Annegret Richter   FRG Montréal 1976
  10,97 1 -1,2   Evelyn Ashford   USA Los Angeles 1984
  10,88 h7 +1.0   Florence Griffith Joyner   USA Seoul 1988
  10,88 q2 +1.6   Evelyn Ashford   USA Seoul 1988
  10,62 q3 +1.0   Florence Griffith Joyner   USA Seoul 1988
  [10.54w] 1 +3.0   Florence Griffith Joyner   USA Seoul 1988

100 metres (Women's) 200 All time Best Perfomances

  Florence_Griffith-Joyner2.jpg
   
    100 m                  
1 10.62 1 Florence Griffith-Joyner 21 Dec 1959 United States USA 1 Heat 3 Seoul 24 September 1988
2 10.71 0,5 Elaine Thompson 28 Jun 1992   JAM 1 Final Rio de Janeiro 13 August 2016
3 10.75 1,5 Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce 27 Dec 1986 Jamaica JAM 1 Final London 4 August 2012
4 10.78 0 Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce 27 Dec 1986 Jamaica JAM 1 Final Beijing 17 August 2008
5 10.78 1,5 Carmelita Jeter 24 Nov 1979 United States USA 2 Final London 4 August 2012
6 10.81 1,5 Veronica Campbell-Brown 15 May 1982 Jamaica JAM 3 Final London 4 August 2012
7 10.82 -1 Gail Devers 19 Nov 1966 United States USA 1 Final Barcelona 1 August 1992
8 10.83 -1 Juliet Cuthbert 9 Apr 1964 Jamaica JAM 2 Final Barcelona 1 August 1992
9 10.83 0 Carmelita Jeter 24 Nov 1979 United States USA 1 Semifinal 1 London 4 August 2012
10 10.83 1,5 Carmelita Jeter 24 Nov 1979 United States USA 1 Heat 2 London 3 August 2012
11 10.83 0,5 Tori Bowie 27 Aug 1990   USA 2 Final Rio de Janeiro 13 August 2016
12 10.84 -1 Irina Privalova 22 Nov 1968 Russia RUS 3 Final Barcelona 1 August 1992
13 10.85 1,2 Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce 27 Dec 1986 Jamaica JAM 1 Semifinal 2 London 4 August 2012
14 10.85 1,5 Tianna Bartoletta 30 Aug 1985 United States USA 4 Final London 4 August 2012
15 10.86 -1 Gwen Torrence 12 Jun 1965 United States USA 4 Final Barcelona 1 August 1992
16 10.86 0,5 Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce 27 Dec 1986   JAM 3 Final Rio de Janeiro 13 August 2016
17 10.86 0,5 Marie Josée Ta Lou 18 Nov 1988   CIV 4 Final Rio de Janeiro 13 August 2016
18 10.88 1 Florence Griffith-Joyner 21 Dec 1959 United States USA 1 Heat 7 Seoul 24 September 1988
19 10.88 1,6 Evelyn Ashford 15 Apr 1957 United States USA 1 Heat 2 Seoul 24 September 1988
20 10.88 -1 Merlene Ottey 10 May 1960 Jamaica JAM 5 Final Barcelona 1 August 1992
21 10.88 0,3 Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce 27 Dec 1986   JAM 1 Semifinal 2 Rio de Janeiro 13 August 2016
22 10.88 0,6 Elaine Thompson 28 Jun 1992   JAM 1 Semifinal 3 Rio de Janeiro 13 August 2016
23 10.89 0 Veronica Campbell-Brown 15 May 1982 Jamaica JAM 2 Semifinal 1 London 4 August 2012
24 10.89 1,5 Allyson Felix 18 Nov 1985 United States USA 5 Final London 4 August 2012
25 10.90 1 Tori Bowie 27 Aug 1990   USA 1 Semifinal 1 Rio de Janeiro 13 August 2016
26 10.90 0,5 Dafne Schippers 15 Jun 1992   NED 5 Final Rio de Janeiro 13 August 2016
27 10.90 1 Michelle-Lee Ahye 10 Apr 1992   TTO 2 Semifinal 1 Rio de Janeiro 13 August 2016
28 10.90 0,3 Dafne Schippers 15 Jun 1992   NED 2 Semifinal 2 Rio de Janeiro 13 August 2016
29 10.90 0,6 English Gardner 22 Apr 1992   USA 2 Semifinal 3 Rio de Janeiro 13 August 2016
30 10.92 -0,5 Gail Devers 19 Nov 1966 United States USA 1 Heat 7 Atlanta 26 July 1996
31 10.92 0,1 Yulia Nestsiarenka 15 Jun 1979 Belarus BLR 1 Semifinal 1 Athens 21 August 2004
32 10.92 1 Blessing Okagbare 9 Oct 1988 Nigeria NGR 1 Semifinal 3 London 4 August 2012
33 10.92 1 Tianna Bartoletta 30 Aug 1985 United States USA 2 Semifinal 3 London 4 August 2012
34 10.92 0,5 Michelle-Lee Ahye 10 Apr 1992   TTO 6 Final Rio de Janeiro 13 August 2016
35 10.93 0,4 Merlene Ottey 10 May 1960 Jamaica JAM 1 Semifinal 1 Atlanta 27 July 1996
36 10.93 -0,1 Yulia Nestsiarenka 15 Jun 1979 Belarus BLR 1 Final Athens 21 August 2004
37 10.93 0,1 Veronica Campbell-Brown 15 May 1982 Jamaica JAM 2 Semifinal 1 Athens 21 August 2004
38 10.93 0,7 Blessing Okagbare 9 Oct 1988 Nigeria NGR 1 Heat 4 London 3 August 2012
39 10.94 -0,7 Gail Devers 19 Nov 1966 United States USA 1 Final Atlanta 27 July 1996
40 10.94 -0,7 Merlene Ottey 10 May 1960 Jamaica JAM 2 Final Atlanta 27 July 1996
41 10.94 0 Gail Devers 19 Nov 1966 United States USA 1 Heat 2 Atlanta 26 July 1996
42 10.94 0,9 Yulia Nestsiarenka 15 Jun 1979 Belarus BLR 1 Heat 2 Athens 20 August 2004
43 10.94 1,2 Allyson Felix 18 Nov 1985 United States USA 2 Semifinal 2 London 4 August 2012
44 10.94 1,5 Veronica Campbell-Brown 15 May 1982 Jamaica JAM 1 Heat 3 London 3 August 2012
45 10.94 1,5 Kelly-Ann Baptiste 14 Oct 1986 Trinidad and Tobago TTO 6 Final London 4 August 2012
46 10.94 0,3 Marie Josée Ta Lou 18 Nov 1988   CIV 3 Semifinal 2 Rio de Janeiro 13 August 2016
47 10.94 0,5 English Gardner 22 Apr 1992   USA 7 Final Rio de Janeiro 13 August 2016
48 10.96 0 Anelia Nuneva 30 Jun 1962 Bulgaria BUL 1 Heat 4 Seoul 24 September 1988
49 10.96 0,5 Heike Drechsler 16 Dec 1964 East Germany GDR 1 Heat 1 Seoul 24 September 1988
50 10.96 -0,7 Gwen Torrence 12 Jun 1965 United States USA 3 Final Atlanta 27 July 1996
51 10.96 -0,1 Lauryn Williams 11 Sep 1983 United States USA 2 Final Athens 21 August 2004
52 10.96 0,4 Kelly-Ann Baptiste 14 Oct 1986 Trinidad and Tobago TTO 1 Heat 1 London 3 August 2012
53 10.96 -0,3 Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce 27 Dec 1986   JAM 1 Heat 4 Rio de Janeiro 12 August 2016
54 10.96 1 Christania Williams 17 Oct 1994   JAM 3 Semifinal 1 Rio de Janeiro 13 August 2016
55 10.97 -1,2 Evelyn Ashford 15 Apr 1957 United States USA 1 Final Los Angeles 5 August 1984
56 10.97 0,4 Gwen Torrence 12 Jun 1965 United States USA 2 Semifinal 1 Atlanta 27 July 1996
57 10.97 -0,1 Veronica Campbell-Brown 15 May 1982 Jamaica JAM 3 Final Athens 21 August 2004
58 10.97 0,7 Tianna Bartoletta 30 Aug 1985 United States USA 2 Heat 4 London 3 August 2012
59 10.98 1,6 Natalya Voronova 9 Jul 1965 Soviet Union URS 2 Heat 2 Seoul 24 September 1988
60 10.98 -1,1 Irina Privalova 22 Nov 1968 Russia RUS 1 Heat 4 Barcelona 31 July 1992
61 10.98 -0,8 Juliet Cuthbert 9 Apr 1964 Jamaica JAM 1 Semifinal 2 Barcelona 1 August 1992
62 10.98 0 Kerron Stewart 16 Apr 1984 Jamaica JAM 2 Final Beijing 17 August 2008
63 10.98 0 Sherone Simpson 12 Aug 1984 Jamaica JAM 2 Final Beijing 17 August 2008
64 10.98 0,4 Kerron Stewart 16 Apr 1984 Jamaica JAM 1 Heat 4 Beijing 16 August 2008
65 10.99 0 Gwen Torrence 12 Jun 1965 United States USA 2 Heat 4 Seoul 24 September 1988
66 10.99 0,5 Evelyn Ashford 15 Apr 1957 United States USA 1 Semifinal 1 Seoul 25 September 1988
67 10.99 1,6 Marlies Göhr 21 Mar 1958 East Germany GDR 3 Heat 2 Seoul 24 September 1988
68 10.99 1 Ekateríni Thánou 1 Feb 1975 Greece GRE 1 Heat 2 Sydney 23 September 2000
69 10.99 0,3 Yulia Nestsiarenka 15 Jun 1979 Belarus BLR 1 Heat 4 Athens 20 August 2004
70 10.99 1,3 Murielle Ahouré 23 Aug 1987 Cote d'Ivoire CIV 1 Heat 7 London 3 August 2012
71 11.00 0,5 Anelia Nuneva 30 Jun 1962 Bulgaria BUL 2 Semifinal 1 Seoul 25 September 1988
72 11.00 -0,7 Chandra Sturrup 12 Sep 1971 Bahamas BAH 4 Final Atlanta 27 July 1996
73 11.00 -0,1 Ivet Lalova-Collio 18 May 1984 Bulgaria BUL 4 Final Athens 21 August 2004
74 11.00 -0,7 Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce 27 Dec 1986 Jamaica JAM 1 Semifinal 1 Beijing 17 August 2008
75 11.00 1,2 Kelly-Ann Baptiste 14 Oct 1986 Trinidad and Tobago TTO 3 Semifinal 2 London 4 August 2012
76 11.00 1,5 Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce 27 Dec 1986 Jamaica JAM 1 Heat 6 London 3 August 2012
77 11.00 1,5 Murielle Ahouré 23 Aug 1987 Cote d'Ivoire CIV 7 Final London 4 August 2012
78 11.00 0,3 Tianna Bartoletta 30 Aug 1985   USA 4 Semifinal 2 Rio de Janeiro 13 August 2016
79 11.00 0 Michelle-Lee Ahye 10 Apr 1992   TTO 1 Heat 6 Rio de Janeiro 12 August 2016
80 11.01 0,6 Annegret Richter 13 Oct 1950 West Germany FRG 1 Semifinal 1 Montreal 25 July 1976
81 11.01 -0,1 Gail Devers 19 Nov 1966 United States USA 1 Semifinal 2 Atlanta 27 July 1996
82 11.01 -0,1 Lauryn Williams 11 Sep 1983 United States USA 1 Semifinal 2 Athens 21 August 2004
83 11.01 1 Murielle Ahouré 23 Aug 1987 Cote d'Ivoire CIV 3 Semifinal 3 London 4 August 2012
84 11.01 1,5 Blessing Okagbare 9 Oct 1988 Nigeria NGR 8 Final London 4 August 2012
85 11.01 1 Murielle Ahouré 23 Aug 1987   CIV 4 Semifinal 1 Rio de Janeiro 13 August 2016
86 11.01 -0,3 Marie Josée Ta Lou 18 Nov 1988   CIV 2 Heat 4 Rio de Janeiro 12 August 2016
87 11.02 0,5 Gwen Torrence 12 Jun 1965 United States USA 3 Semifinal 1 Seoul 25 September 1988
88 11.02 -2,9 Gwen Torrence 12 Jun 1965 United States USA 1 Semifinal 1 Barcelona 1 August 1992
89 11.02 0 Merlene Ottey 10 May 1960 Jamaica JAM 1 Heat 4 Atlanta 26 July 1996
90 11.02 0,1 Sherone Simpson 12 Aug 1984 Jamaica JAM 1 Heat 2 Beijing 16 August 2008
91 11.03 -0,3 Evelyn Ashford 15 Apr 1957 United States USA 1 Semifinal 1 Los Angeles 5 August 1984
92 11.03 0,1 Merlene Ottey 10 May 1960 Jamaica JAM 1 Heat 8 Seoul 24 September 1988
93 11.03 0,5 Merlene Ottey 10 May 1960 Jamaica JAM 2 Heat 1 Seoul 24 September 1988
94 11.03 1 Juliet Cuthbert 9 Apr 1964 Jamaica JAM 2 Heat 3 Seoul 24 September 1988
95 11.03 -0,1 Sherone Simpson 12 Aug 1984 Jamaica JAM 2 Semifinal 2 Athens 21 August 2004
96 11.03 0 Lauryn Williams 11 Sep 1983 United States USA 1 Heat 2 Athens 20 August 2004
97 11.03 0 Lauryn Williams 11 Sep 1983 United States USA 4 Final Beijing 17 August 2008
98 11.04 -0,1 Mary Onyali 3 Feb 1968 Nigeria NGR 2 Semifinal 2 Atlanta 27 July 1996
99 11.04 0,1 Ivet Lalova-Collio 18 May 1984 Bulgaria BUL 3 Semifinal 1 Athens 21 August 2004
100 11.04 0,1 Debbie Ferguson McKenzie 16 Jan 1976 Bahamas BAH 4 Semifinal 1 Athens 21 August 2004
101 11.04 1 Kerron Stewart 16 Apr 1984 Jamaica JAM 4 Semifinal 3 London 4 August 2012
102 11.05 1,1 Annegret Richter 13 Oct 1950 West Germany FRG 1 Heat 1 Montreal 24 July 1976
103 11.05 1 Lyudmila Kondratyeva 11 Apr 1958 Soviet Union URS 3 Heat 3 Seoul 24 September 1988
104 11.05 -0,1 Aleen Bailey 25 Nov 1980 Jamaica JAM 5 Final Athens 21 August 2004
105 11.05 -0,2 Kerron Stewart 16 Apr 1984 Jamaica JAM 1 Semifinal 2 Beijing 17 August 2008
106 11.06 0,4 Lyudmila Kondratyeva 11 Apr 1958 Soviet Union URS 1 Heat 1 Moscow 25 July 1980
107 11.06 1 Lyudmila Kondratyeva 11 Apr 1958 Soviet Union URS 1 Final Moscow 26 July 1980
108 11.06 1,4 Evelyn Ashford 15 Apr 1957 United States USA 1 Heat 3 Los Angeles 4 August 1984
109 11.06 -0,7 Marina Trandenkova 7 Jan 1967 Russia RUS 5 Final Atlanta 27 July 1996
110 11.06 0,6 Juliet Cuthbert 9 Apr 1964 Jamaica JAM 1 Heat 4 Atlanta 26 July 1996
111 11.06 0,3 Chryste Gaines 14 Sep 1970 United States USA 1 Heat 10 Sydney 23 September 2000
112 11.06 -0,7 Muna Lee 30 Oct 1981 United States USA 2 Semifinal 1 Beijing 17 August 2008
113 11.06 0,1 Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce 27 Dec 1986 Jamaica JAM 1 Heat 1 Beijing 16 August 2008
114 11.06 1,5 Ivet Lalova-Collio 18 May 1984 Bulgaria BUL 2 Heat 3 London 3 August 2012
115 11.07 -0,2 Renate Stecher 12 May 1950 East Germany GDR 1 Final Munich 2 September 1972
116 11.07 1 Marlies Göhr 21 Mar 1958 East Germany GDR 2 Final Moscow 26 July 1980
117 11.07 -2,9 Merlene Ottey 10 May 1960 Jamaica JAM 2 Semifinal 1 Barcelona 1 August 1992
118 11.07 -0,1 Natalya Voronova 9 Jul 1965 Russia RUS 3 Semifinal 2 Atlanta 27 July 1996
119 11.07 -0,1 Chandra Sturrup 12 Sep 1971 Bahamas BAH 4 Semifinal 2 Atlanta 27 July 1996
120 11.07 -0,1 Juliet Cuthbert 9 Apr 1964 Jamaica JAM 5 Semifinal 2 Atlanta 27 July 1996
121 11.07 0,4 Marina Trandenkova 7 Jan 1967 Russia RUS 3 Semifinal 1 Atlanta 27 July 1996
122 11.07 -0,1 Sherone Simpson 12 Aug 1984 Jamaica JAM 6 Final Athens 21 August 2004
123 11.07 0 Muna Lee 30 Oct 1981 United States USA 5 Final Beijing 17 August 2008
124 11.07 0,4 Lauryn Williams 11 Sep 1983 United States USA 2 Heat 4 Beijing 16 August 2008
125 11.07 0,4 Myriam Soumaré 29 Oct 1986 France FRA 2 Heat 1 London 3 August 2012
126 11.07 1,3 Laverne Jones-Ferrette 16 Sep 1981 United States Virgin Islands ISV 2 Heat 7 London 3 August 2012
127 11,08   Wyomia Tyus   1945 United States USA 1 Final Mexico 15 October 1968
128 11.08 0 Annegret Richter 13 Oct 1950 West Germany FRG 1 Final Montreal 25 July 1976
129 11.08 1,6 Nelli Cooman 6 Jun 1964 Netherlands NED 4 Heat 2 Seoul 24 September 1988
130 11.08 -2,9 Irina Privalova 22 Nov 1968 Russia RUS 3 Semifinal 1 Barcelona 1 August 1992
131 11.08 0 Mary Onyali 3 Feb 1968 Nigeria NGR 2 Heat 2 Atlanta 26 July 1996
132 11.08 0,3 Merlene Ottey 10 May 1960 Jamaica JAM 1 Heat 1 Sydney 23 September 2000
133 11.08 0,3 Zhanna Block 6 Jul 1972 Ukraine UKR 1 Heat 3 Sydney 23 September 2000
134 11.08 0,1 Muna Lee 30 Oct 1981 United States USA 2 Heat 2 Beijing 16 August 2008
135 11.08 1,3 Kerron Stewart 16 Apr 1984 Jamaica JAM 3 Heat 7 London 3 August 2012
136 11.08 0,3 Desiree Henry 26 Aug 1995   GBR 1 Heat 1 Rio de Janeiro 12 August 2016
137 11.09 0,4 Romy Müller 26 Jul 1958 East Germany GDR 2 Heat 1 Moscow 25 July 1980
138 11.09 1,1 Anelia Nuneva 30 Jun 1962 Bulgaria BUL 1 Heat 1 Seoul 24 September 1988
139 11.09 -0,1 Sherone Simpson 12 Aug 1984 Jamaica JAM 1 Heat 3 Athens 20 August 2004
140 11.09 0 Ivet Lalova-Collio 18 May 1984 Bulgaria BUL 2 Heat 2 Athens 20 August 2004
141 11.09 0,6 Blessing Okagbare 9 Oct 1988   NGR 3 Semifinal 3 Rio de Janeiro 13 August 2016
142 11.09 -0,2 English Gardner 22 Apr 1992   USA 1 Heat 8 Rio de Janeiro 12 August 2016
143 11.09 0,6 Desiree Henry 26 Aug 1995   GBR 4 Semifinal 3 Rio de Janeiro 13 August 2016
144 11.10 1,1 Renate Stecher 12 May 1950 East Germany GDR 1 Semifinal 2 Montreal 25 July 1976
145 11.10 0,1 Evelyn Ashford 15 Apr 1957 United States USA 1 Heat 5 Seoul 24 September 1988
146 11.10 0,5 Juliet Cuthbert 9 Apr 1964 Jamaica JAM 4 Semifinal 1 Seoul 25 September 1988
147 11.10 1 Silke Möller 20 Jun 1964 East Germany GDR 4 Heat 3 Seoul 24 September 1988
148 11.10 -1 Anelia Nuneva 30 Jun 1962 Bulgaria BUL 6 Final Barcelona 1 August 1992
149 11.10 -0,7 Natalya Voronova 9 Jul 1965 Russia RUS 6 Final Atlanta 27 July 1996
150 11.10 -1,1 Ekateríni Thánou 1 Feb 1975 Greece GRE 1 Semifinal 2 Sydney 24 September 2000
151 11.10 -0,8 Ekateríni Thánou 1 Feb 1975 Greece GRE 1 Heat 5 Sydney 23 September 2000
152 11.10 -0,4 Debbie Ferguson McKenzie 16 Jan 1976 Bahamas BAH 1 Heat 8 Sydney 23 September 2000
153 11.10 0,8 Savatheda Fynes 17 Oct 1974 Bahamas BAH 1 Heat 4 Sydney 23 September 2000
154 11.10 0,2 Christine Arron 13 Sep 1973 France FRA 1 Heat 1 Athens 20 August 2004
155 11.10 -0,7 Lauryn Williams 11 Sep 1983 United States USA 3 Semifinal 1 Beijing 17 August 2008
156 11.10 0,4 Kim Gevaert 5 Aug 1978 Belgium BEL 3 Heat 4 Beijing 16 August 2008
157 11.10 1,2 Ezinne Okparaebo 3 Mar 1988 Norway NOR 4 Semifinal 2 London 4 August 2012
158 11.11 0,4 Lyudmila Kondratyeva 11 Apr 1958 Soviet Union URS 1 Semifinal 2 Moscow 26 July 1980
159 11.11 0,2 Natalya Voronova 9 Jul 1965 Soviet Union URS 1 Heat 6 Seoul 24 September 1988
160 11.11 -0,7 Gwen Torrence 12 Jun 1965 United States USA 1 Heat 1 Atlanta 26 July 1996
161 11.11 0,2 Gwen Torrence 12 Jun 1965 United States USA 1 Heat 6 Atlanta 26 July 1996
162 11.11 0,6 D'Andre Hill 19 Apr 1973 United States USA 2 Heat 4 Atlanta 26 July 1996
163 11.11 1 Tayna Lawrence 17 Sep 1975 Jamaica JAM 2 Heat 2 Sydney 23 September 2000
164 11.11 -0,7 Sherone Simpson 12 Aug 1984 Jamaica JAM 4 Semifinal 1 Beijing 17 August 2008
165 11,12   Barbara Ferrell   1947 United States USA 1 Quarter-Finals Heat One Mexico 14 October 1968
166 11.12 0,4 Ingrid Lange 2 Sep 1957 East Germany GDR 1 Heat 3 Moscow 25 July 1980
167 11.12 1 Marlies Göhr 21 Mar 1958 East Germany GDR 1 Heat 2 Moscow 25 July 1980
168 11.12 0 Gwen Torrence 12 Jun 1965 United States USA 1 Heat 3 Seoul 24 September 1988
169 11.12 0,5 Silke Möller 20 Jun 1964 East Germany GDR 5 Semifinal 1 Seoul 25 September 1988
170 11.12 -0,8 Gail Devers 19 Nov 1966 United States USA 2 Semifinal 2 Barcelona 1 August 1992
171 11.12 -0,7 Juliet Cuthbert 9 Apr 1964 Jamaica JAM 1 Heat 2 Barcelona 31 July 1992
172 11.12 -1,1 Tayna Lawrence 17 Sep 1975 Jamaica JAM 2 Semifinal 2 Sydney 24 September 2000
173 11.12 -0,4 Ekateríni Thánou 1 Feb 1975 Greece GRE 1 Final Sydney 24 September 2000
174 11.12 -0,1 Aleen Bailey 25 Nov 1980 Jamaica JAM 2 Heat 3 Athens 20 August 2004
175 11.12 0,4 Verena Sailer 16 Oct 1985 Germany GER 3 Heat 1 London 3 August 2012
176 11.13 0 Renate Stecher 12 May 1950 East Germany GDR 2 Final Montreal 25 July 1976
177 11.13 1 Lyudmila Kondratyeva 11 Apr 1958 Soviet Union URS 1 Heat 4 Moscow 25 July 1980
178 11.13 -1,2 Alice Brown 20 Sep 1960 United States USA 2 Final Los Angeles 5 August 1984
179 11.13 0 Grace Jackson Small 14 Jun 1961 Jamaica JAM 3 Heat 4 Seoul 24 September 1988
180 11.13 0,5 Marlies Göhr 21 Mar 1958 East Germany GDR 6 Semifinal 1 Seoul 25 September 1988
181 11.13 -0,5 Evelyn Ashford 15 Apr 1957 United States USA 1 Heat 1 Barcelona 31 July 1992
182 11.13 -0,7 Mary Onyali 3 Feb 1968 Nigeria NGR 7 Final Atlanta 27 July 1996
183 11.13 0,6 Merlene Ottey 10 May 1960 Jamaica JAM 1 Heat 3 Atlanta 26 July 1996
184 11.13 -0,1 Aleen Bailey 25 Nov 1980 Jamaica JAM 3 Semifinal 2 Athens 21 August 2004
185 11.13 0,1 Yevgeniya Polyakova 29 May 1983 Russia RUS 2 Heat 1 Beijing 16 August 2008
186 11.13 1,1 Damola Osayomi 26 Jun 1986 Nigeria NGR 1 Heat 8 Beijing 16 August 2008
187 11.13 1 Myriam Soumaré 29 Oct 1986 France FRA 5 Semifinal 3 London 4 August 2012
188 11.13 1,5 Gloria Asumnu 22 May 1985 Nigeria NGR 3 Heat 3 London 3 August 2012
189 11.13 0 Tori Bowie 27 Aug 1990   USA 1 Heat 3 Rio de Janeiro 12 August 2016
190 11.14 1 Ingrid Lange 2 Sep 1957 East Germany GDR 3 Final Moscow 26 July 1980
191 11.14 0 Marina Zhirova 6 Jun 1963 Soviet Union URS 4 Heat 4 Seoul 24 September 1988
192 11.14 1,1 Juliet Cuthbert 9 Apr 1964 Jamaica JAM 1 Heat 4 Seoul 24 September 1988
193 11.14 -0,8 Juliet Cuthbert 9 Apr 1964 Jamaica JAM 1 Heat 3 Barcelona 31 July 1992
194 11.14 -0,7 Zhanna Block 6 Jul 1972 Ukraine UKR 8 Final Atlanta 27 July 1996
195 11.14 -0,1 Melanie Paschke 29 Jun 1970 Germany GER 6 Semifinal 2 Atlanta 27 July 1996
196 11.14 0 Zhanna Block 6 Jul 1972 Ukraine UKR 2 Heat 4 Atlanta 26 July 1996
197 11.14 0,4 Zhanna Block 6 Jul 1972 Ukraine UKR 4 Semifinal 1 Atlanta 27 July 1996
198 11.14 0,4 Chioma Ajunwa 25 Dec 1970 Nigeria NGR 5 Semifinal 1 Atlanta 27 July 1996
199 11.14 0,3 Tayna Lawrence 17 Sep 1975 Jamaica JAM 2 Heat 10 Sydney 23 September 2000
200 11.14 0 Christine Arron 13 Sep 1973 France FRA 1 Heat 7 Athens 20 August 2004
201 11.14 0 Vida Anim 7 Dec 1983 Ghana GHA 1 Heat 7 Athens 20 August 2004
202 11.14 0,9 Merlene Ottey 10 May 1960 Slovenia SLO 2 Heat 2 Athens 20 August 2004
203 11.14 0 Jeanette Kwakye 20 Mar 1983 Great Britain GBR 6 Final Beijing 17 August 2008
204 11.14 0,4 Yulia Nestsiarenka 15 Jun 1979 Belarus BLR 4 Heat 4 Beijing 16 August 2008
205 11.14 0,4 Ezinne Okparaebo 3 Mar 1988 Norway NOR 4 Heat 1 London 3 August 2012
206 11.14 1 Angela Tenorio 27 Jan 1996   ECU 5 Semifinal 1 Rio de Janeiro 13 August 2016
      100 m(w)                  
1 10,54 3 Florence Griffith-Joyner 21 Dec 1959 United States USA 1 Final Seoul 25 September 1988
2 10.70 2,6 Florence Griffith-Joyner 21 Dec 1959 United States USA 1 Semifinal 2 Seoul 25 September 1988
3 10,83 3 Evelyn Ashford 15 Apr 1957 United States USA 2 Final Seoul 25 September 1988
4 10,85 3 Heike Drechsler 16 Dec 1964 East Germany GDR 3 Final Seoul 25 September 1988
5 10,91 2,6 Heike Drechsler 16 Dec 1964 East Germany GDR 2 Semifinal 2 Seoul 25 September 1988
6 10,97 3 Grace Jackson Small 14 Jun 1961 Jamaica JAM 4 Final Seoul 25 September 1988
7 10,97 3 Gwen Torrence 12 Jun 1965 United States USA 5 Final Seoul 25 September 1988
8 11.00 3 Natalya Voronova 9 Jul 1965 Soviet Union URS 6 Final Seoul 25 September 1988
9 11,01 2,2 Allyson Felix 18 Nov 1985 United States USA 1 Heat 5 London 3 August 2012
10 11,03 2,6 Natalya Voronova 9 Jul 1965 Soviet Union URS 3 Semifinal 2 Seoul 25 September 1988
11 11,06 2,6 Grace Jackson Small 14 Jun 1961 Jamaica JAM 4 Semifinal 2 Seoul 25 September 1988
12 11,07 2,2 Rosângela Santos 20 Dec 1990 Brazil BRA 2 Heat 5 London 3 August 2012
13 11,08 w Wyomia Tyus   1945 United States USA 1 Quarter-Finals Heat Two Mexico 14 October 1968
14 11,12 2,6 Ulrike Sarvari 27 Jun 1964 West Germany FRG 5 Semifinal 2 Seoul 25 September 1988
15 11,12 2,6 Pauline Davis-Thompson 9 Jul 1966 Bahamas BAH 6 Semifinal 2 Seoul 25 September 1988
16 11,13 2,6 Nelli Cooman 6 Jun 1964 Netherlands NED 7 Semifinal 2 Seoul 25 September 1988
17 11,14 2,2 Ruddy Zang Milama 6 Jun 1987 Gabon GAB 3 Heat 5 London 3 August 2012
 
  Pefomances annulled cause of doping
  10.75 -0.4 Marion Jones 12 Oct 1975 United States USA 1 Final Sydney 24 September 2000
  10.83 1 Marion Jones 12 Oct 1975 United States USA 1 Quarter-Finals Heat Two Sydney 23 September 2000
  11.01 -1.1 Marion Jones 12 Oct 1975 United States USA 1 Semifinal 2 Sydney 24 September 2000
  11.04   Semoy Hackett 27 Nov 1988 Trinidad and Tobago TTO 2 Heat 6 London 3 August 2012

 

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