3. Olympic Games (Athletics) - Events

Olympic Events in Athletics - 100 metres Hurdles (Women's)

100 metres Hurdles (Women's)

First Gold Medalist
Annelie Ehrhardt cropped
 GDR Annelie Ehrhardt

Games: 12 games in 11 countries
First Held: 1972 Summer Games
Last Held: 2016 Summer Games

Participants: 300 from 93 countries
Top Athlete Medalist(s): 5 athletes with 2 medals
Top Country Medalist(s): USA United States (12 medals)

The sprint hurdles at the Summer Olympics have been contested over a variety of distances at the multi-sport event. The men's 110 metres hurdles has been present on the Olympic athletics programme since the first edition in 1896. A men's 200 metres hurdles was also briefly held, from 1900 to 1904. The first women's sprint hurdling event was added to the programme at the 1932 Olympics in the form of the 80 metres hurdles. At the 1972 Games the women's distance was extended to the 100 metres hurdles, which is the current international standard.

The Olympic records are 12.91 seconds for the men's 110 m hurdles, set by Liu Xiang in 2004, and 12.35 seconds for the women's 100 m hurdles, set by Sally Pearson in 2012. The fastest time recorded at the Olympics for the men's 200 m hurdles was 24.6 seconds by 1904 winner Harry Hillman. Maureen Caird won the last women's Olympic 80 m hurdles race in 1968 with a record of 10.39 seconds. The men's 110 m hurdles world record has been broken at the Olympics on six occasions: 1908, 1928, 1932, 1936, 1972 and 2004. The women's 100 m hurdles world record has been broken only once, by Annelie Ehrhardt at the inaugural 1972 Olympic final. In contrast the 80 m hurdles world record was set at the Olympics in 1932 (four times), 1936, and 1952 (twice).

 

Overview
Sport Athletics
Gender Women
Years held Women 100 m: 1972 – 2016
Olympic record
Women 12.35 Sally Pearson (2012)
Reigning champion
Women  Brianna Rollins (USA)

Only three athletes have won two Olympic sprint hurdles gold medals: on the men's side, Lee Calhoun and Roger Kingdom, and on the women's side Shirley Strickland. Strickland is also the only athlete to win three such Olympic medals, having won a bronze medal before her victories.

Alvin Kraenzlein is the only athlete to have won two hurdles medals at the same Olympics, having taken the 110 m and 200 m titles. Historically, hurdlers also competed in other individual sprinting events (Harrison Dillard and Fanny Blankers-Koen were also 100 metres Olympic champions), but this became rare after the 1950s.

The United States has dominated the men's event: with 19 gold medals and 56 medals in total, the nation won over half the available medals in the history of the competition. The United States has swept the medals on eight occasions and an American man has been on the podium every edition except the 1980 Moscow Olympics, which it boycotted. Though less dominant in the women's events, it shares the most number of women's gold medals with Australia, having four each.

Women's 100 metres hurdles

GamesGoldSilverBronze
1972 Munich Annelie Ehrhardt
 East Germany
Valeria Bufanu
 Romania
Karin Balzer
 East Germany
1976 Montreal Johanna Schaller-Klier
 East Germany
Tatyana Anisimova
 Soviet Union
Natalya Lebedeva
 Soviet Union
1980 Moscow Vera Komisova
 Soviet Union
Johanna Schaller-Klier
 East Germany
Lucyna Langer
 Poland
1984 Los Angeles Benita Fitzgerald
 United States
Shirley Strong
 Great Britain
Michèle Chardonnet
 France
Kim Turner
 United States
1988 Seoul Yordanka Donkova
 Bulgaria
Gloria Siebert
 East Germany
Claudia Zackiewicz
 West Germany
1992 Barcelona Voula Patoulidou
 Greece
LaVonna Martin
 United States
Yordanka Donkova
 Bulgaria
1996 Atlanta Ludmila Engquist
 Sweden
Brigita Bukovec
 Slovenia
Patricia Girard
 France
2000 Sydney Olga Shishigina
 Kazakhstan
Glory Alozie
 Nigeria
Melissa Morrison
 United States
2004 Athens Joanna Hayes
 United States
Olena Krasovska
 Ukraine
Melissa Morrison
 United States
2008 Beijing Dawn Harper
 United States
Sally McLellan
 Australia
Priscilla Lopes-Schliep
 Canada
2012 London Sally Pearson
 Australia
Dawn Harper
 United States
Kellie Wells
 United States
2016 Rio de Janeiro Brianna Rollins
 United States
Nia Ali
 United States
Kristi Castlin
 United States

Multiple medalists

RankAthleteNationOlympicsGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1 Johanna Schaller East Germany (GDR) 1976–1980 1 1 0 2
Sally Pearson Australia (AUS) 2008–2012 1 1 0 2
Dawn Harper United States (USA) 2008–2012 1 1 0 2
4 Yordanka Donkova Bulgaria (BUL) 1988–1992 1 0 1 2
5 Melissa Morrison United States (USA) 2000–2004 0 1 1 2

Medalists by country

RankNationGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1 United States (USA) 3 2 4 9
2 East Germany (GDR) 2 2 1 5
3 Soviet Union (URS) 1 1 1 3
4 Australia (AUS) 1 1 0 2
5 Bulgaria (BUL) 1 0 1 2
6 Greece (GRE) 1 0 0 1
Kazakhstan (KAZ) 1 0 0 1
Sweden (SWE) 1 0 0 1
9 Great Britain (GBR) 0 1 0 1
Nigeria (NGR) 0 1 0 1
Romania (ROU) 0 1 0 1
Slovenia (SLO) 0 1 0 1
Ukraine (UKR) 0 1 0 1
14 France (FRA) 0 0 2 2
15 Canada (CAN) 0 0 1 1
Poland (POL) 0 0 1 1
West Germany (FRG) 0 0 1 1

Women 100-meter hurdle at Olympics

100 meter Hurdle for Women at Olympics: The hurdling event is a running event, which involve running over hurdles set on the track. The hurdle races are generally held only in the Olympics. The 100 meter hurdle race is the standard sprint

 
hurdle for women, which is competed at the international competitions. In the event, 10 hurdles are placed along the track at a gap of 8.5 meter. The height of the hurdles in the 100 meter hurdle event is 84.0 centimeter. The 100 meter hurdle race is a very technical event. Only the well conditioned and skilled athletes can succeed in the event.

100 meter Hurdle for Women in Summer Olympics: The 100 meter hurdle event was held in the women's athletics program at the 1972 Munich Summer Games. Since the 1972 Games, the event has been held at every Summer Games.

Rules for 100 meter Hurdle for Women at Olympics: The International Association of Athletics Federations or IAAF has set rules to be followed in the track and field athletics events. The rules applicable to the 100 meter hurdle event at the international competitions are-

  • Metal and wood are used to make hurdles and the top bars of the hurdles.
  • The hurdles are made in such a way, that they can be adjusted at different height for different events.
  • The IAAF has specified the length and width of each hurdle. The top bar of each hurdle is painted white and black in color.
  • Runners cannot leave or change their respective lanes during the race.
  • An athlete is disqualified from the competition if she deliberately knocks down the hurdles in her way. However, if the hurdles are overturned unintentionally, then that is not considered to be an offence.
  • An athlete cannot obstruct her competitors' way during the race. If found, an athlete can be disqualified from the competition.
  • If an athlete steps out of the track during the race, she is not allowed to join her competitors.
  • The athlete, who is unable to finish the race, is not given any credit for her performance.
  • The automatic timing device used for measuring the time during the races has to be approved by the IAAF.
Medal Winners in the 100 meter Hurdle for Women at Olympics: Some of the famous athletes, who won medals in the 100 meter hurdle event, are Joanna Hayes, Olga Shishigina, Ludmila Engquist, Voula Patoulidou, Yordanka Donkova, Benita Fitzgerald-Brown, Vera Komisova, Johanna Schaller-Klier, Annelie Ehrhardt, Olena Krasovska, Glory Alozie, Brigita Bukovec, LaVonna Martin, Gloria Siebert, Shirley Strong, Tatyana Anisimova, Valeria Bufanu, Michelle Perry, Perdita Felicien and Gail Devers.
patoulidou 252863 164224 type13262

Olympic history: Women’s 100m hurdles

In a special series in the run-up to Rio 2016, Steve Smythe looks at the history of events at the Olympics, this time the women’s 100m hurdles

This was a topsy-turvy event in 2015 with Americans running the 18 fastest times of the year but not winning a medal in Beijing.

The 2015 world No.1 at 12.34 and American champion Shakira Nelvis was only eighth in the World Championships. Jasmine Stowers ran 12.35 last year but didn’t make the American team.

Brianna Rollins, the 2013 world champion, who ran 12.26 that year, did make it to Beijing but was not in top form and finished fourth.

Former Olympic champion Dawn Harper Nelson was adjudged to be top-ranked on merit despite crashing out in the world semi-finals and she has been brilliant in the last two Olympics.

Jamaican Danielle Williams won the world title but will be lucky to win gold again with a 12.57 clocking and the other medallists out in China, Cindy Roleder and Alina Talay, are unlikely to win a medal again. Defending champion Sally Pearson was injured for much of 2015.

Britain’s Tiffany Porter could be in the mix for at least a top five place if she can get back to her World Championships medal-winning form.

1932-2012

The first Olympic hurdles champion was Babe Didrikson in Los Angeles in 1932. The talented all-rounder, who had qualified for all five women’s individual events, had to choose three. She was already javelin champion when she equalled the world 80m hurdles record of 11.8 in the heats.

She improved to 11.7 in the final but only won by inches from American team-mate Evelyn Hall. Many thought it should have been a dead heat and it was even closer in 1936 in Berlin when officials took 30 minutes to sort the result, the first four sharing the winning time of 11.7.

The winner, Trebisonda Valla, had run a windy 11.6 in the heats, which equalled the then world’s fastest time, though it only counted as an Olympic record.

In 1948 in London, the record significantly fell to world record-holder Fanny Blankers-Koen, who had already won the 100m. She won only narrowly, though, in 11.2 from Britain’s Maureen Gardner (see “British successes” below). A metre behind in third was 100m medallist Shirley Strickland. The Australian returned in 1952 in Helsinki and there she equalled Blankers-Koen’s world record of 11.0 in her heat and then a windy 10.8 in the semi-final.

In the final, she won easily in a world record 10.9 as a less than fully fit Blankers- Koen failed to finish.

She retained her title in Melbourne in 1956 as she improved her Olympic record to 10.7, though it’s worth noting the electronic time was a mere 10.96.

In Rome in 1960 Irina Press, the younger sister of shot and discus champion Tamara added to the family collection with an easy win. She ran only 10.8 in the final, having run an Olympic record 10.6 in the heats.

Tokyo in 1964 saw a return to close races with the first three separated by two hundredths. Balzer’s 10.5 would have equalled the world record but for the wind being marginally over the limits.

The bronze medallist, Pam Kilborn, was unbeaten in the next four years and favourite for Mexico in 1968 but a slow start in the final meant she couldn’t quite catch her 17-year-old Australian team-mate Maureen Caird. She won in an Olympic record 10.39, which still stands as 1972 saw a change to the 100m hurdles.

The first race at the longer hurdles saw East German Annelie Ehrhardt win very easily in Munich in a world record 12.59. The 1964 champion, Balzer, just edged double medallist Kilborn for bronze.

Ehrhardt injured herself in the Montreal 1976 semi-finals but East Germany nevertheless retained the title with Johanna Schaller narrowly winning as five hundredths covered the top five.

Schaller just lost out in 1980 as Vera Komisova improved by a huge 0.28 seconds in Moscow to win in an Olympic record 12.54.

After the boycott-affected 1984 (see “British successes” below), the standard was better than ever in Seoul in 1988. World record-holder Yordanka Donkova won easily in an Olympic record 12.38.

The 1996 race was a much closer affair. Lyudmila Narozhilenko had fallen in the 1988 semi-finals and withdrew injured from 1992. In 1993 she tested positive for steroids and was initially banned for four years but the IAAF accepted that her husband had spiked her protein drink because she was divorcing him for her Swedish manager. She was then granted Swedish citizenship in June 1996 and the Russians cleared her to compete in July, just before Atlanta.

In America, she competed as Ludmila Engquist and after a 12.47 quarter-final and a 12.51 semi-final, she was less impressive in the final but won in 12.58.

Her reputation was tarnished later, though, as she failed a drugs test when bobsleighing in 2001.

There was also a drugs connection in Sydney in 2000 when Kazakhstan’s Olga Shishigina, who had missed Atlanta because of a drugs ban, won in 12.65.

The times were faster in Athens in 2004, where American Johanna Hayes reduced the Olympic mark to 12.37 as world champion and favourite Perdita Felicien had a heavy fall in the final.

The 2008 Olympics in Beijing saw Sally McClellan lead early on. Lolo Jones went clearly ahead mid-race but she smashed the ninth hurdle, lost momentum and dropped from first to seventh. Dawn Harper came through to win in 12.54.

Four years later in London, McClellan, now named Pearson and world champion with 12.28, won in an Olympic record 12.35 with Harper surprisingly close in a PB 12.37.

Most memorable Olympic 100m hurdles: Barcelona 1992

The race was expected to be between world champion Lyudmila Narozhilenko, who had run the five fastest times that year, and 100m champion Gail Devers, but the Russian strained a hamstring in qualifying. In the final, Devers moved into a clear lead after the fourth hurdle and appeared to be on her way to an easy victory but hit the last hurdle hard and did well to stay on her feet and finish fifth.

With Devers out of it, the race for gold was between defending champion Donkova, LaVonna Martin and Voula Patouildou. The latter had entered the event with a 12.96 PB and wildly celebrated when coming third in her semi-final to become the first Greek woman track finalist. Patoulidou had gone out in the first round of the previous year’s World Championships, but an inspired finish saw her pull off one of the Olympics’ biggest surprises as she won in 12.64 from Martin’s 12.69.

Devers, who won hurdles world titles in 1993, 1995 and 1999 and won Olympic 100m titles in 1992 and 1996, had no such success in the hurdles. She was fourth in 1996 and in 2000 she ran the fastest qualifying round in Australia with a 12.66 heat but pulled up injured in her semi-final.

100 metres Hurdles (Women's) History Year by Year (by IAAF) 1896-2012

 80-1.JPG  80-2.JPG
Munich, 8 Sep 1972
(Competitors: 25; Countries: 15; Finalists: 8)

Final

RankNameNationalityLaneTimeNotes
1st, gold medalist(s) Annelie Ehrhardt East Germany 6 12.59 WR
2nd, silver medalist(s) Valeria Bufanu Romania 7 12.84  
3rd, bronze medalist(s) Karin Balzer East Germany 5 12.90  
4 Pam Kilborn Australia 3 12.98  
5 Teresa Nowak Poland 1 13.17  
6 Danuta Straszyńska Poland 8 13.18  
7 Annerose Krumpholz East Germany 2 13.27  
8 Grażyna Rabsztyn Poland 4 13.44  
Ehrhardt had run 12.5 twice during 1972, and confirmed her status as favourite with 12.70 in the first heat, more than 2m ahead of Ryan (12.93), with Bufanu the only other athlete under 13.00 in the first round. Ehrhardt (12.73) and Bufanu (12.84), were the semi winners. In the final Ryan and Ehrhardt were away fastest, and the German flowed away from the field, gaining ground with every stride, to win by the largest margin of victory in the women’s Olympic sprint hurdles. Behind her Balzer went past Ryan halfway through the race, but could not withstand the finish of Bufanu, who passed the German after the ninth hurdle. Ehrhardt’s 12.59 would remain the electrically-timed world record for nearly six years.
Montreal, 29 Jul 1976
(Competitors: 23; Countries: 15; Finalists: 8)

Final

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1st, gold medalist(s) Johanna Schaller-Klier East Germany 12.77  
2nd, silver medalist(s) Tatyana Anisimova Soviet Union 12.78  
3rd, bronze medalist(s) Natalya Lebedeva Soviet Union 12.80  
4 Gudrun Berend East Germany 12.82  
5 Grażyna Rabsztyn Poland 12.96  
6 Esther Roth-Shahamorov Israel 13.04  
7 Valeria Bufanu Romania 13.35  
8 Ileana Ongar Italy 13.51  
Schaller and Anisimova were the semi-final winners, though Anisimova had to win her semi twice after her teammate Lyubov Kononova was disqualified for impeding Ştefănescu. Having run 12.91, Anisimova then ran 13.08 as reigning champion Ehrhardt, who had been third in the first run, was eliminated. In the final Rabsztyn was the early leader, but by the eighth hurdle she had been caught by the Soviet and GDR runners. Rabsztyn hit the ninth hurdle, and Anisimova and Schaller were even off the last hurdle, with the German just edging the Russian on the run-in. With only 0.05 separating first from fourth, this was even closer than the 1964 final.
Moscow, 28 Jul 1980
(Competitors: 20; Countries: 11; Finalists: 8)

Final

RankFinalTime
Med 1.png  Vera Komisova (URS) 12.56
Med 2.png  Johanna Klier (GDR) 12.63
Med 3.png  Lucyna Langer (POL) 12.65
4.  Kerstin Knabe (GDR) 12.66
5.  Grażyna Rabsztyn (POL) 12.74
6.  Irina Litovchenko (URS) 12.84
7.  Bettine Gärtz (GDR) 12.93
8.  Zofia Bielczyk (POL) 13.08
Rabsztyn had set a world record of 12.36 in June, but had never finished higher than fifth in a major championship, so was no better than co-favourite with reigning champion Klier. The heats began with Komisova improving her best from 12.84 to 12.67 to become a medal threat. Rabsztyn responded with the fastest time in the semis, 12.64, ahead of Klier (12.77), as Komisova won the other semi-final in 12.78. Rabsztyn got a dreadful start in the final and never got on terms with the top four, as Klier and Claus started quickest. Komisova was inches behind them. She caught Klier at the fifth hurdle and motored away to win by more than half a metre in 12.56, finally breaking Ehrhardt’s Olympic record. Klier just held off the fast finish of Langer, with Claus inches behind, as 0.03 seconds covered second to fourth. The following week Komisova ran 12.39 in Rome, a Soviet record which would last more than a decade.
Los Angeles, 10 Aug 1984
(Competitors: 22; Countries: 14; Finalists: 8)

Final

Held on August 10, 1984

RANKFINALTIME
Gold medal with cup.svg  Benita Fitzgerald-Brown (USA) 12.84
Silver medal with cup.svg  Shirley Strong (GBR) 12.88
Bronze medal with cup.svg  Kim Turner (USA) 13.06
Bronze medal with cup.svg  Michèle Chardonnet (FRA) 13.06
5.  Glynis Nunn (AUS) 13.20
6.  Marie-Noëlle Savigny (FRA) 13.28
7.  Ulrike Denk (FRG) 13.32
8.  Pam Page (USA) 13.40
The effect of the boycott was enormous; at the end of the year all of the top eight ranked hurdlers were Eastern bloc athletes. Britain’s Shirley Strong was favoured to beat the Americans, and was fastest in the heats with 12.86w, but Fitzgerald was the quickest in the semi-finals with 12.98. Fitzgerald and Strong were out quickest, and Strong was the midrace leader. The tall (1.78/64Kg) American caught the Briton at the eight hurdle, and won by 30cm, with Turner and Chardonnet level 2m behind them. Initially the two were announced as tied, but before the medal ceremony, Turner was given third place outright. The French officially protested, and six months later Chardonnet received her bronze medal when it had been decided that there had been a tie after all.
Seoul, 30 Sep 1988
(Competitors: 36; Countries: 24; Finalists: 8)

Final

RANKFINALTIME
Med 1.png  Yordanka Donkova (BUL) 12.38(OR)
Med 2.png  Gloria Siebert (GDR) 12.61
Med 3.png  Claudia Zackiewicz (FRG) 12.75
4.  Nataliya Grygoryeva (URS) 12.79
5.  Florence Colle (FRA) 12.98
6.  Julie Rocheleau (CAN) 12.99
7.  Monique Ewanje-Epee (FRA) 13.14
8.  Cornelia Oschkenat (GDR) 13.73
Donkova, the world record holder, was favourite, and after Siebert ran the fastest heat ever (12.65), the Bulgarian asserted herself, setting an Olympic record 12.47 in the second round, with Lyudmila Narozhilenko (URS) running 12.62 behind her. Donkova won the first semi-final in 12.58 just ahead of Siebert (12.60), and Oschkenat took the other race in 12.63, as Narozhilenko failed to finish. Just as the USSR athlete had injured herself in the preceding round, so Oschkenat was affected in the final, and she was never a factor. Donkova dominated the race, leading from the gun and quickly building up a lead of a metre. This was extended to two at the finish, as she broke her own Olympic record. Zaczkiewicz finished quickly to edge Grigoryeva for the bronze.
Barcelona, 6 Aug 1992
(Competitors: 37; Countries: 23; Finalists: 8)

Final

RANKFINALTIME
Med 1.png  Voula Patoulidou (GRE) 12.64
Med 2.png  LaVonna Martin (USA) 12.69
Med 3.png  Yordanka Donkova (BUL) 12.70
4.  Lynda Tolbert (USA) 12.75
5.  Gail Devers (USA) 12.75
6.  Aliuska López (CUB) 12.87
7.  Natalya Kolovanova (EUN) 13.01
8.  Odalys Adams (CUB) 13.57
Devers was the fastest in the first two rounds, with an easy 12.76 in the second round. Martin twice ran 12.82, and Donkova clocked 12.84 as the only other runner under 12.90. In the semi-finals Devers let Tolbert past after hitting the eighth hurdle, with the winner clocking an undistinguished 13.10 against a wind of 1.9. In the other race, Martin improved by 0.01 to 12.81 ahead of Donkova’s 12.87 and Patoulidou’s Greek record 12.88 in windless conditions. Martin started fastest in the final, but Devers’ greater sprint speed quickly came to the fore, and by hurdle two she was leading. At halfway the lead was half a metre, with Martin just ahead of Tolbert, Donkova and Patoulidou. The Greek came through strongly and was second at the ninth hurdle, 1.5m behind the flying Devers. Coming off the ninth hurdle Devers seemed to hesitate and she hit the final barrier with her leading foot, and fell forward. Her momentum carried her falling to the line, but she was passed by Patoulidou and Martin with 3m remaining. In the confusion it was difficult to see if she had reached the line before the others, but the photo-finish showed her to have placed fifth. Patoulidou’s reaction was not understated; “I won! I don’t believe it !”
Atlanta, 31 Jul 1996
(Competitors: 44; Countries: 28; Finalists: 8)

Final

RANKNAME ATHLETETIMELANE
Med 1.png  Ludmila Engquist (SWE) 12.58 6
Med 2.png  Brigita Bukovec (SLO) 12.59 3
Med 3.png  Patricia Girard (FRA) 12.65 5
4.  Gail Devers (USA) 12.66 8
5.  Dione Rose (JAM) 12.74 2
6.  Michelle Freeman (JAM) 12.76 4
7.  Lynda Tolbert-Goode (USA) 13.11 1
DISQ (Drugs)  Natalya Shekhodanova (RUS) 12.80 7
Engquist had competed twice under her previous name of Narozhilenko, but had been injured both times. She then was disqualified for drug usage for two years, but claimed that her estranged husband had sabotaged her. After reinstatement she married her manager and qualified to compete for Sweden in the Olympics. A superb technician, Engquist’s principal rival was the blazing fast, but technically weaker Devers. Engquist (12.66) was the fastest in the heats and improved to 12.47 in the second round, with Freeman next quickest with 12.57. Freeman (12.61) and Engquist (12.51) were the semi-final winners, with Devers running 12.62 behind the Swede and Girard (12.59). Girard ran the best first half in the final, but was caught by Bukovec just after the fifth hurdle. Engquist was then level with Devers, but powered through to catch the Slovenian at the last hurdle and won by 0.006. Girard had a similar margin over Devers for the bronze medal. Shekhodanova finished seventh, but was disqualified after failing a doping test. It should be noted that Engquist also committed a further doping violation, while training as a bobsledder, in 2001.
Sydney, 27 Sep 2000
(Competitors: 38; Countries: 26; Finalists: 8)

Finals

Heat 1 of 1
Date: Wednesday 27 September 2000
PlaceAthleteNationLaneReactionTimeRecord
1st, gold medalist(s) Olga Shishigina Kazakhstan 7 0.237 s 12.65 s  
2nd, silver medalist(s) Gloria Alozie Nigeria 3 0.217 s 12.68 s  
3rd, bronze medalist(s) Melissa Morrison United States 6 0.180 s 12.76 s  
4 Delloreen Ennis-London Jamaica 8 0.156 s 12.80 s  
5 Aliuska Lopez Cuba 1 0.179 s 12.83 s  
6 Nicole Ramalalanirina France 4 0.194 s 12.91 s  
7 Linda Ferga France 2 0.294 s 13.11 s  
8 Brigitte Foster Jamaica 5 0.217 s 13.49 s  
Had it not been for winning two gold medals in the 100m by the total margin of 0.01 seconds, Gail Devers might have been considered one of the unluckiest athletes in Olympic history. For the third time she was the pre-Games hurdles favourite. On this occasion she had won the US trials in 12.33, leaving her 0.19 quicker than any other Sydney competitor. After clocking 12.62 in round 1 – a time no-one else would match – and winning her quarter in 12.77, she suffered a hamstring injury in her semi-final and pulled up after five hurdles. Alozie was the fastest qualifier for the final with 12.68 in her semi-final, having suffered with the tragedy of her fiancé being killed when struck by a car in Sydney just before the Games opened. Foster had run a personal best of 12.70 behind Alozie and just ahead of Shishigina (12.71). In the final Shishigina had her usual sluggish start, and by halfway Alozie was a metre clear of her, with Morrison in second place. Shishigina showed her 11.13 flat speed in the second half, catching Alozie at the last hurdle and winning by 25cm. She became Kazahkstan’s first individual Olympic Champion in athletics.
Athens, 24 Aug 2004
(Competitors: 37; Countries: 24; Finalists: 8)

Final

Wind: +1.5 m/s

RankLaneNameNationalityReactionResultNotes
1st, gold medalist(s) 4 Joanna Hayes United States 0.169 12.37 OR
2nd, silver medalist(s) 1 Olena Krasovska Ukraine 0.151 12.45 PB
3rd, bronze medalist(s) 3 Melissa Morrison United States 0.145 12.56  
4 7 Mariya Koroteyeva Russia 0.195 12.72  
5 2 Lacena Golding-Clarke Jamaica 0.149 12.73  
6 8 Angela Whyte Canada 0.155 12.81  
  5 Perdita Felicien Canada 0.167 DNF  
  6 Irina Shevchenko Russia 0.155 DNF  
The expectation was that Gail Devers would finally strike gold, unless World Champion Felicien beat her. The American veteran failed to clear a barrier in the heats, a victim of an apparent calf injury. Hayes, better known as a 400m hurdler before 2004, was fastest in the heats (12.71), and was again the quickest in the semi-finals, winning the second race in a pb 12.48 after Felicien had won the other semi in 12.49. Hayes started best in the final, and Felicien, striving to get back on terms smashed the first hurdle, falling, and knocking over Shevchenko. Hayes continued on her way, crushing her lifetime best to finish in 12.37, setting an Olympic record in the process. Krasovska, who had begun in Athens with a lifetime best of 12.74, improved to 12.45, with a tremendous second half surge, taking her from fourth to second in the last 30m. Morrison repeated her Sydney bronze. An unsuccessful protest was lodged on behalf of the unfortunate Shevchenko. Had it been upheld there would have been a re-run but it did not help the Russian’s cause that she did not attempt to get up and complete the race after the accident.
Beijing, 19 Aug 2008
(Competitors: 32; Countries: 23; Finalists: 8)

Final

PositionLaneNameNationalityReactionTimeNotes
1st, gold medalist(s) 6 Dawn Harper United States 0.193 12.54 PB
2nd, silver medalist(s) 3 Sally McLellan Australia 0.138 12.64  
3rd, bronze medalist(s) 8 Priscilla Lopes-Schliep Canada 0.174 12.64  
4 7 Damu Cherry United States 0.239 12.65  
5 5 Delloreen Ennis-London Jamaica 0.151 12.65  
6 9 Brigitte Foster-Hylton Jamaica 0.167 12.66  
7 4 LoLo Jones United States 0.185 12.72  
8 2 Sarah Claxton Great Britain 0.163 12.94  
For the third time in four Olympics, the favourite came to grief in the final. That favourite was Jones, undefeated for two months prior to the Games, and with a scintillating windy 12.29 at the US trials. After a 12.71 heat, which was bettered by Jamaican heat winners Vonette Dixon and Foster-Hylton (both 12.69), Jones flowed to a semi-final win in 12.43, nearly two tenths quicker then the next-fastest qualifier. In the final, McLellan was fastest away, and Jones only took the lead coming off the fourth hurdle. Harper, the least fancied of the Americans, was closest to Jones by the fifth barrier, and was less than a metre behind when Jones hit the ninth hurdle with her lead leg and faltered. Harper went by her immediately, and led by a metre across the tenth barrier, with six women level behind her. Jones, still losing momentum, finished seventh, as McLellan just held off the fast-finishing Lopes-Schliep, withjust 0.02 seconds covering second to sixth. Harper, possibly the most surprising winner in Beijing summed it up perfectly “it’s so surreal, it’s so amazing”. “Stuff happens,” concluded Jones. “Lots of people have been trying to put words in my mouth into why I tripped but I can’t give a clear explanation.” She gained admiration by waiting in the stadium to congratulate Harper as her compatriot finished her lap of honour.
London, 7 Aug 2012
(Competitors: 48; Countries: 38; Finalists: 8)

Final

Wind: −0.2 m/s

RankLanesAthleteNationTimeNotes
1st, gold medalist(s) 7 Sally Pearson Australia 12.35 OR
2nd, silver medalist(s) 4 Dawn Harper United States 12.37 PB
3rd, bronze medalist(s) 5 Kellie Wells United States 12.48 PB
4 2 Lolo Jones United States 12.58 SB
5 6 Nevin Yanıt Turkey 12.58 =NR
6 3 Phylicia George Canada 12.65 =PB
7 8 Jessica Zelinka Canada 12.69  
8 9 Beate Schrott Austria 13.07  
The IAAF athlete of the year in 2011, Pearson (née McLellan) was still favourite despite losing to Wells three weeks before the Games. The
Australian was the fastest in the heats with 12.57, with Wells (12.69) and Jones (12.68) the next quickest. In the first semi-final defending
champion Harper Nelson ran a lifetime best of 12.46. The next heat featured a scintillating 12.39 by Pearson. The final semi was won by
Wells (12.51) ahead of the then European Champion Yanýt (12.58).
Pearson was the leader to the first hurdle in a rainsoaked final, with Harper Nelson close behind. The two fought a magnificent duel, with
Harper Nelson never more than 0.05 behind. The American closed to within 0.02 of the flying Australian at the end. It was so close that
Pearson began her celebrations only when her name flashed up first on the stadium scoreboard, 30 seconds later. All three medallists had cause for delight as both Harper Nelson and Wells set personal bests. Jones’s respectable fourth place was some atonement for her Beijing disaster. There the good news ended, because after years of dispute it transpired that original fifth-placer Yanýt was guilty of doping violations dating back to June 2012. As well as her fifth place in London, she was stripped of two European titles.
Rio de Janeiro, 17 Aug 2016
(Competitors: 48; Countries: 34; Finalists: 8)

Final

RankAthleteNationalityTimeNotes
1st place, gold medalist(s) Brianna Rollins  United States 12.48  
2nd place, silver medalist(s) Nia Ali  United States 12.59  
3rd place, bronze medalist(s) Kristi Castlin  United States 12.61  
4 Cindy Ofili  Great Britain 12.63 SB
5 Cindy Roleder  Germany 12.74  
6 Pedrya Seymour  Bahamas 12.76  
7 Tiffany Porter  Great Britain  
8 Phylicia George  Canada 12.89  

The United States came into this event with the top 25 performances and top 7 athletes in the world in 2016. But only three athletes can come from one country. World #1 Kendra Harrison failed to qualify at the United States Olympic Trials. Three weeks after the trials, she set the world record, surpassing Yordanka Donkova's 28 year old mark. World #4 Jasmin Stowers, #6 Queen Harrison and #7 Sharika Nelvis also were beaten at the Trials.

The semi-finals foretold the dominance of the American team as they each won one of the three semi finals. In the final, Brianna Rollins had already achieved the lead by the first hurdle and by the second hurdle it was clear her closest pursuer was Nia Ali. Sisters Cindy Ofili and Tiffany Porter, American born but competing for Great Britain, their mother's homeland, were even in the third-place position. By the fourth barrier, Kristi Castlin was in a battle for last place with Phylicia George and Cindy Roleder, half a stride behind Rollins. Between the fourth and sixth hurdles, Castlin got rolling, gaining and then passing Pedrya Seymour, Porter and finally over the last hurdle, Ofili. Rollins had a clear one metre victory. On the run in, Castlin came very close to Ali as Ofili gave her best desperate lean.

It was an American sweep. The United States has swept the men's 110 metres hurdles six times, this was the first time for women and the first time the women's event has been swept by any country. It was also the first time that the United States has swept the medals in an Olympic women's track and field event.

The following evening the medals were presented by Paul Tergat, IOC member, Kenya and Stephanie Hightower, Council Member of the IAAF.

100 metres Hurdles (Women's) Progression of Olympic Record

  
Women
100 metres hurdles
13,3 13,34 Pen -0,2   Heide Rosendahl-Ecker   FRG Munich 1972
13,3 13,25 Pen -0,2   Christine Bodner   GDR Munich 1972
12,7 12.70 h1 0   Annelie Ehrhardt   GDR Munich 1972
12,6 12,59 1 -0,6   Annelie Ehrhardt   GDR Munich 1972
  12,56 1 +0.9   Vera Komisova   URS Moscow 1980
  12,47 q1 +1.3   Yordanka Donkova   BUL Seoul 1988
  12,38 1 +0.2   Yordanka Donkova   BUL Seoul 1988
  12,37 1 +1.5   Joanna Hayes   USA Athens 2004
  12.35 1 -0.2   Sally Pearson   AUS London 2012

100 metres Hurdles (Women's) 200 All time Best Perfomances

Sally_Pearson.jpg  
      100 m hurdles                  
1 12.35 -0,2 Sally Pearson 19 Sep 1986 Australia AUS 1 Final London 7 August 2012
2 12.37 -0,2 Dawn Harper Nelson 13 May 1984 United States USA 2 Final London 7 August 2012
3 12.37 1,5 Joanna Hayes 23 Dec 1976 United States USA 1 Final Athens 24 August 2004
4 12.38 0,2 Yordanka Donkova 28 Sep 1961 Bulgaria BUL 1 Final Seoul 30 September 1988
5 12.39 1,3 Sally Pearson 19 Sep 1986 Australia AUS 1 Semifinal 2 London 7 August 2012
6 12.43 0,2 Lolo Jones 5 Aug 1982 United States USA 1 Semifinal 1 Beijing 18 August 2008
7 12.45 1,5 Olena Krasovska 17 Jun 1976 Ukraine UKR 2 Final Athens 24 August 2004
8 12.46 0,9 Dawn Harper Nelson 13 May 1984 United States USA 1 Semifinal 1 London 7 August 2012
9 12.47 1,3 Yordanka Donkova 28 Sep 1961 Bulgaria BUL 1 Heat 1 Seoul 29 September 1988
10 12.47 1,4 Ludmila Engquist 21 Apr 1964 Sweden SWE 1 Heat 2 Atlanta 29 July 1996
11 12.47 0,2 Brianna Rollins 18 Aug 1991   USA 1 Semifinal 1 Rio de Janeiro 17 August 2016
12 12.48 -0,2 Kellie Wells 16 Jul 1982 United States USA 3 Final London 7 August 2012
13 12.48 1,9 Joanna Hayes 23 Dec 1976 United States USA 1 Semifinal 2 Athens 23 August 2004
14 12.48 0 Brianna Rollins 18 Aug 1991   USA 1 Final Rio de Janeiro 17 August 2016
15 12.49 1,7 Perdita Felicien 29 Aug 1980 Canada CAN 1 Semifinal 1 Athens 23 August 2004
16 12.51 0,6 Kellie Wells 16 Jul 1982 United States USA 1 Semifinal 3 London 7 August 2012
17 12.51 1 Ludmila Engquist 21 Apr 1964 Sweden SWE 1 Semifinal 2 Atlanta 31 July 1996
18 12.53 1,7 Melissa Morrison-Howard 9 Jul 1971 United States USA 2 Semifinal 1 Athens 23 August 2004
19 12.54 0,1 Dawn Harper Nelson 13 May 1984 United States USA 1 Final Beijing 19 August 2008
20 12.54 0,4 Brianna Rollins 18 Aug 1991   USA 1 Heat 6 Rio de Janeiro 16 August 2016
21 12.56 0,9 Vera Komisova 11 Jun 1953 Soviet Union URS 1 Final Moscow 28 July 1980
22 12.56 1,5 Melissa Morrison-Howard 9 Jul 1971 United States USA 3 Final Athens 24 August 2004
23 12.57 -0,1 Sally Pearson 19 Sep 1986 Australia AUS 1 Heat 5 London 6 August 2012
24 12.57 1,2 Michelle Freeman 5 May 1969 Jamaica JAM 1 Heat 3 Atlanta 29 July 1996
25 12.58 -0,2 Lolo Jones 5 Aug 1982 United States USA 4 Final London 7 August 2012
26 12.58 0,2 Ludmila Engquist 21 Apr 1964 Sweden SWE 1 Final Atlanta 31 July 1996
27 12.58 0,5 Yordanka Donkova 28 Sep 1961 Bulgaria BUL 1 Semifinal 1 Seoul 30 September 1988
28 12.58 1,7 Olena Krasovska 17 Jun 1976 Ukraine UKR 3 Semifinal 1 Athens 23 August 2004
29 12.59 0,2 Brigita Bukovec 21 May 1970 Slovenia SLO 2 Final Atlanta 31 July 1996
30 12.59 0,8 Anneliese Ehrhardt 18 Jun 1950 East Germany GDR 1 Final Munich 8 September 1972
31 12.59 1 Patricia Girard 8 Apr 1968 France FRA 2 Semifinal 2 Atlanta 31 July 1996
32 12.59 0 Nia Ali 23 Oct 1988   USA 2 Final Rio de Janeiro 17 August 2016
33 12.60 0,5 Gloria Siebert 13 Jan 1964 East Germany GDR 2 Semifinal 1 Seoul 30 September 1988
34 12.60 1,7 Mariya Koroteyeva 10 Nov 1981 Russia RUS 4 Semifinal 1 Athens 23 August 2004
35 12.60 1,7 Delloreen Ennis 5 Mar 1975 Jamaica JAM 5 Semifinal 1 Athens 23 August 2004
36 12.61 0,2 Gloria Siebert 13 Jan 1964 East Germany GDR 2 Final Seoul 30 September 1988
37 12.61 0,7 Michelle Freeman 5 May 1969 Jamaica JAM 1 Semifinal 1 Atlanta 31 July 1996
38 12.61 0 Kristi Castlin 7 Jul 1988   USA 3 Final Rio de Janeiro 17 August 2016
39 12.62 0,2 Damu Cherry 29 Nov 1977 United States USA 1 Semifinal 2 Beijing 18 August 2008
40 12.62 0,7 Gail Devers 19 Nov 1966 United States USA 1 Heat 5 Sydney 25 September 2000
41 12.62 1 Gail Devers 19 Nov 1966 United States USA 3 Semifinal 2 Atlanta 31 July 1996
42 12.62 1,3 Ludmila Engquist 21 Apr 1964 Soviet Union URS 2 Heat 1 Seoul 29 September 1988
43 12.62 1,7 Glory Alozie 30 Dec 1977 Spain ESP 6 Semifinal 1 Athens 23 August 2004
44 12.63 0,4 Cornelia Oschkenat 29 Oct 1961 East Germany GDR 1 Semifinal 2 Seoul 30 September 1988
45 12.63 0,7 Brigita Bukovec 21 May 1970 Slovenia SLO 2 Semifinal 1 Atlanta 31 July 1996
46 12.63 0,9 Johanna Klier 13 Sep 1952 East Germany GDR 2 Final Moscow 28 July 1980
47 12.63 0,8 Kristi Castlin 7 Jul 1988   USA 1 Semifinal 3 Rio de Janeiro 17 August 2016
48 12.63 0 Cindy Ofili 5 Aug 1994   GBR 4 Final Rio de Janeiro 17 August 2016
49 12.64 0,1 Sally Pearson 19 Sep 1986 Australia AUS 2 Final Beijing 19 August 2008
50 12.64 0,1 Priscilla Lopes-Schliep 26 Aug 1982 Canada CAN 3 Final Beijing 19 August 2008
51 12.64 0,4 Paraskeví Patoulídou 23 Apr 1965 Greece GRE 1 Final Barcelona 6 August 1992
52 12.64 1 Dionne Rose-Henley 7 Nov 1969 Jamaica JAM 4 Semifinal 2 Atlanta 31 July 1996
53 12.64 1,2 Grazyna Rabsztyn 20 Sep 1952 Poland POL 1 Semifinal 2 Moscow 28 July 1980
54 12.64 0,2 Pedrya Seymour 29 May 1995   BAH 2 Semifinal 1 Rio de Janeiro 17 August 2016
55 12.65 -0,2 Phylicia George 16 Nov 1987 Canada CAN 5 Final London 7 August 2012
56 12.65 0 Olga Shishigina 23 Dec 1968 Kazakhstan KAZ 1 Final Sydney 27 September 2000
57 12.65 0,1 Gloria Siebert 13 Jan 1964 East Germany GDR 1 Heat 2 Seoul 29 September 1988
58 12.65 0,1 Damu Cherry 29 Nov 1977 United States USA 4 Final Beijing 19 August 2008
59 12.65 0,1 Delloreen Ennis 5 Mar 1975 Jamaica JAM 5 Final Beijing 19 August 2008
60 12.65 0,2 Patricia Girard 8 Apr 1968 France FRA 3 Final Atlanta 31 July 1996
61 12.65 0,6 Phylicia George 16 Nov 1987 Canada CAN 2 Semifinal 3 London 7 August 2012
62 12.65 0,9 Lucyna Kałek 9 Jan 1956 Poland POL 3 Final Moscow 28 July 1980
63 12.65 -0,1 Nia Ali 23 Oct 1988   USA 1 Semifinal 2 Rio de Janeiro 17 August 2016
64 12.66 0,1 Brigitte Foster-Hylton 7 Nov 1974 Jamaica JAM 6 Final Beijing 19 August 2008
65 12.66 0,2 Dawn Harper Nelson 13 May 1984 United States USA 2 Semifinal 2 Beijing 18 August 2008
66 12.66 0,2 Gail Devers 19 Nov 1966 United States USA 4 Final Atlanta 31 July 1996
67 12.66 0,8 Ludmila Engquist 21 Apr 1964 Sweden SWE 1 Heat 3 Atlanta 29 July 1996
68 12.66 0,9 Kerstin Knabe 7 Jul 1959 East Germany GDR 4 Final Moscow 28 July 1980
69 12.66 1,3 Jessica Zelinka 3 Sep 1981 Canada CAN 2 Semifinal 2 London 7 August 2012
70 12.66 1,5 Brigita Bukovec 21 May 1970 Slovenia SLO 1 Heat 1 Atlanta 29 July 1996
71 12.66 1,5 Olga Shishigina 23 Dec 1968 Kazakhstan KAZ 1 Heat 2 Sydney 25 September 2000
72 12.67 0,2 Delloreen Ennis 5 Mar 1975 Jamaica JAM 2 Semifinal 1 Beijing 18 August 2008
73 12.67 0,7 Natalya Shekhodanova 29 Dec 1971 Russia RUS 3 Semifinal 1 Atlanta 31 July 1996
74 12.67 1,2 Vera Komisova 11 Jun 1953 Soviet Union URS 1 Heat 1 Moscow 27 July 1980
75 12.67 1,4 Aliuska López 29 Aug 1969 Cuba CUB 2 Heat 2 Atlanta 29 July 1996
76 12.67 1,7 Susanna Kallur 16 Feb 1981 Sweden SWE 7 Semifinal 1 Athens 23 August 2004
77 12.67 1,9 Irina Shevchenko 2 Sep 1975 Russia RUS 2 Semifinal 2 Athens 23 August 2004
78 12.68 -0,4 Glory Alozie 30 Dec 1977 Nigeria NGR 1 Semifinal 2 Sydney 27 September 2000
79 12.68 -0,2 Josephine Onyia 15 Jul 1986 Spain ESP 1 Heat 1 Beijing 17 August 2008
80 12.68 -0,2 Susanna Kallur 16 Feb 1981 Sweden SWE 2 Heat 1 Beijing 17 August 2008
81 12.68 0 Glory Alozie 30 Dec 1977 Nigeria NGR 2 Final Sydney 27 September 2000
82 12.68 0,2 Priscilla Lopes-Schliep 26 Aug 1982 Canada CAN 3 Semifinal 1 Beijing 18 August 2008
83 12.68 0,4 Lolo Jones 5 Aug 1982 United States USA 1 Heat 6 London 6 August 2012
84 12.68 1,2 Natalya Shekhodanova 29 Dec 1971 Russia RUS 2 Heat 3 Atlanta 29 July 1996
85 12.68 -0,5 Kristi Castlin 7 Jul 1988   USA 1 Heat 1 Rio de Janeiro 16 August 2016
86 12.69 -0,3 Kellie Wells 16 Jul 1982 United States USA 1 Heat 3 London 6 August 2012
87 12.69 -0,2 Jessica Zelinka 3 Sep 1981 Canada CAN 6 Final London 7 August 2012
88 12.69 -0,1 Vonette Dixon 26 Nov 1975 Jamaica JAM 1 Heat 2 Beijing 17 August 2008
89 12.69 0,2 Cornelia Oschkenat 29 Oct 1961 East Germany GDR 1 Heat 2 Seoul 29 September 1988
90 12.69 0,2 Natalya Grigoryeva 3 Dec 1962 Soviet Union URS 2 Heat 2 Seoul 29 September 1988
91 12.69 0,4 Brigitte Foster-Hylton 7 Nov 1974 Jamaica JAM 1 Heat 5 Beijing 17 August 2008
92 12.69 0,4 LaVonna Martin-Floréal 18 Nov 1966 United States USA 2 Final Barcelona 6 August 1992
93 12.69 1,9 Lacena Golding-Clarke 20 Mar 1975 Jamaica JAM 3 Semifinal 2 Athens 23 August 2004
94 12.69 1,9 Angela Whyte 22 May 1980 Canada CAN 4 Semifinal 2 Athens 23 August 2004
95 12.69 0,2 Cindy Roleder 21 Aug 1989   GER 3 Semifinal 1 Rio de Janeiro 17 August 2016
96 12.70 -0,4 Brigitte Foster-Hylton 7 Nov 1974 Jamaica JAM 2 Semifinal 2 Sydney 27 September 2000
97 12.70 0 Anneliese Ehrhardt 18 Jun 1950 East Germany GDR 1 Heat 1 Munich 4 September 1972
98 12.70 0,2 Sally Pearson 19 Sep 1986 Australia AUS 4 Semifinal 1 Beijing 18 August 2008
99 12.70 0,4 Yordanka Donkova 28 Sep 1961 Bulgaria BUL 3 Final Barcelona 6 August 1992
100 12.70 1 Aliuska López 29 Aug 1969 Cuba CUB 5 Semifinal 2 Atlanta 31 July 1996
101 12.70 1 Jasmine Camacho-Quinn 21 Aug 1996   PUR 1 Heat 5 Rio de Janeiro 16 August 2016
102 12.71 -1,4 Joanna Hayes 23 Dec 1976 United States USA 1 Heat 4 Athens 22 August 2004
103 12.71 -0,6 Lolo Jones 5 Aug 1982 United States USA 1 Heat 4 Beijing 17 August 2008
104 12.71 -0,4 Olga Shishigina 23 Dec 1968 Kazakhstan KAZ 3 Semifinal 2 Sydney 27 September 2000
105 12.71 0,6 Alina Talay 14 May 1989 Belarus BLR 1 Heat 1 London 6 August 2012
106 12.71 1,3 Lolo Jones 5 Aug 1982 United States USA 3 Semifinal 2 London 7 August 2012
107 12.71 0,8 Cindy Ofili 5 Aug 1994   GBR 2 Semifinal 3 Rio de Janeiro 17 August 2016
108 12.72 0 Mariya Koroteyeva 10 Nov 1981 Russia RUS 1 Heat 3 Athens 22 August 2004
109 12.72 0,1 Lolo Jones 5 Aug 1982 United States USA 7 Final Beijing 19 August 2008
110 12.72 0,2 Brigita Bukovec 21 May 1970 Slovenia SLO 1 Heat 5 Atlanta 29 July 1996
111 12.72 0,7 Grazyna Rabsztyn 20 Sep 1952 Poland POL 1 Heat 3 Moscow 27 July 1980
112 12.72 1,4 Cornelia Oschkenat 29 Oct 1961 East Germany GDR 1 Heat 4 Seoul 29 September 1988
113 12.72 1,4 Patricia Girard 8 Apr 1968 France FRA 3 Heat 2 Atlanta 29 July 1996
114 12.72 1,5 Mariya Koroteyeva 10 Nov 1981 Russia RUS 4 Final Athens 24 August 2004
115 12.73 0 Perdita Felicien 29 Aug 1980 Canada CAN 2 Heat 3 Athens 22 August 2004
116 12.73 0,4 Dawn Harper Nelson 13 May 1984 United States USA 2 Heat 5 Beijing 17 August 2008
117 12.73 0,5 Anneliese Ehrhardt 18 Jun 1950 East Germany GDR 1 Semifinal 2 Munich 7 September 1972
118 12.73 0,8 Gail Devers 19 Nov 1966 United States USA 1 Heat 6 Atlanta 29 July 1996
119 12.73 1,5 Lacena Golding-Clarke 20 Mar 1975 Jamaica JAM 5 Final Athens 24 August 2004
120 12.74 0,2 Dionne Rose-Henley 7 Nov 1969 Jamaica JAM 5 Final Atlanta 31 July 1996
121 12.74 0,9 Grazyna Rabsztyn 20 Sep 1952 Poland POL 5 Final Moscow 28 July 1980
122 12.74 1 Gloria Siebert 13 Jan 1964 East Germany GDR 1 Heat 3 Seoul 29 September 1988
123 12.74 1 Yuliya Graudyn 13 Nov 1970 Russia RUS 6 Semifinal 2 Atlanta 31 July 1996
124 12.74 1,7 Nadine Faustin-Parker 14 Apr 1976 Haiti HAI 8 Semifinal 1 Athens 23 August 2004
125 12.74 0 Cindy Roleder 21 Aug 1989   GER 5 Final Rio de Janeiro 17 August 2016
126 12.74 1 Alina Talay 14 May 1989   BLR 2 Heat 5 Rio de Janeiro 16 August 2016
127 12.75 -0,7 Dawn Harper Nelson 13 May 1984 United States USA 1 Heat 4 London 6 August 2012
128 12.75 -0,1 Priscilla Lopes-Schliep 26 Aug 1982 Canada CAN 2 Heat 2 Beijing 17 August 2008
129 12.75 0,2 Claudia Zaczkiewicz 4 Jul 1962 West Germany FRG 3 Final Seoul 30 September 1988
130 12.75 0,4 Claudia Zaczkiewicz 4 Jul 1962 West Germany FRG 2 Semifinal 2 Seoul 30 September 1988
131 12.75 0,4 Lynda Goode 3 Oct 1967 United States USA 4 Final Barcelona 6 August 1992
132 12.75 0,4 Gail Devers 19 Nov 1966 United States USA 5 Final Barcelona 6 August 1992
133 12.75 0,6 Jessica Zelinka 3 Sep 1981 Canada CAN 2 Heat 1 London 6 August 2012
134 12.75 0,6 Tatyana Dektyareva 8 May 1981 Russia RUS 3 Semifinal 3 London 7 August 2012
135 12.75 0,7 Brigitte Foster-Hylton 7 Nov 1974 Jamaica JAM 2 Heat 5 Sydney 25 September 2000
136 12.75 1,2 Lucyna Kałek 9 Jan 1956 Poland POL 2 Heat 1 Moscow 27 July 1980
137 12.75 0,9 Cindy Ofili 5 Aug 1994   GBR 1 Heat 3 Rio de Janeiro 16 August 2016
138 12.76 -1,6 Melissa Morrison-Howard 9 Jul 1971 United States USA 1 Heat 1 Sydney 25 September 2000
139 12.76 -1,2 Melissa Morrison-Howard 9 Jul 1971 United States USA 1 Heat 1 Athens 22 August 2004
140 12.76 -0,7 Gail Devers 19 Nov 1966 United States USA 1 Heat 3 Barcelona 5 August 1992
141 12.76 0 Melissa Morrison-Howard 9 Jul 1971 United States USA 3 Final Sydney 27 September 2000
142 12.76 0,1 Ludmila Engquist 21 Apr 1964 Soviet Union URS 2 Heat 2 Seoul 29 September 1988
143 12.76 0,2 Brigitte Foster-Hylton 7 Nov 1974 Jamaica JAM 3 Semifinal 2 Beijing 18 August 2008
144 12.76 0,2 Michelle Freeman 5 May 1969 Jamaica JAM 6 Final Atlanta 31 July 1996
145 12.76 1,5 Dionne Rose-Henley 7 Nov 1969 Jamaica JAM 2 Heat 1 Atlanta 29 July 1996
146 12.76 1,7 Michelle Freeman 5 May 1969 Jamaica JAM 1 Heat 2 Atlanta 29 July 1996
147 12.76 1,9 Natalya Rusakova 12 Dec 1980 Russia RUS 5 Semifinal 2 Athens 23 August 2004
148 12.76 0 Tiffany Porter 13 Nov 1987   GBR 7 Final Rio de Janeiro 17 August 2016
149 12.76 -0,2 Nia Ali 23 Oct 1988   USA 1 Heat 2 Rio de Janeiro 16 August 2016
150 12.76 0 Pedrya Seymour 29 May 1995   BAH 6 Final Rio de Janeiro 17 August 2016
151 12.77 -1,2 Delloreen Ennis 5 Mar 1975 Jamaica JAM 2 Heat 1 Athens 22 August 2004
152 12.77 0 Johanna Schaller 13 Sep 1952 East Germany GDR 1 Final Montreal 29 July 1976
153 12.77 0,6 Gail Devers 19 Nov 1966 United States USA 1 Heat 3 Sydney 25 September 2000
154 12.77 0,7 Lynda Goode 3 Oct 1967 United States USA 4 Semifinal 1 Atlanta 31 July 1996
155 12.77 0,9 Nicole Ramalalanirina 5 Mar 1972 France FRA 1 Semifinal 1 Sydney 27 September 2000
156 12.77 1,2 Johanna Klier 13 Sep 1952 East Germany GDR 2 Semifinal 2 Moscow 28 July 1980
157 12.77 1,2 Kerstin Knabe 7 Jul 1959 East Germany GDR 3 Heat 1 Moscow 27 July 1980
158 12.77 1,5 Yuliya Graudyn 13 Nov 1970 Russia RUS 3 Heat 1 Atlanta 29 July 1996
159 12.77 -0,1 Phylicia George 16 Nov 1987   CAN 2 Semifinal 2 Rio de Janeiro 17 August 2016
160 12.78 0 Vera Komisova 11 Jun 1953 Soviet Union URS 1 Semifinal 1 Moscow 28 July 1980
161 12.78 0 Tatyana Anisimova 19 Oct 1949 Soviet Union URS 2 Final Montreal 29 July 1976
162 12.78 1,4 Lynda Goode 3 Oct 1967 United States USA 4 Heat 2 Atlanta 29 July 1996
163 12.78 1,4 Gillian Russell 28 Sep 1973 Jamaica JAM 5 Heat 2 Atlanta 29 July 1996
164 12.78 1,5 Sharon Couch 13 Sep 1967 United States USA 2 Heat 2 Sydney 25 September 2000
165 12.79 0,2 Natalya Grigoryeva 3 Dec 1962 Soviet Union URS 4 Final Seoul 30 September 1988
166 12.79 0,6 Tiffany Porter 13 Nov 1987 Great Britain GBR 3 Heat 1 London 6 August 2012
167 12.79 1,3 Tiffany Porter 13 Nov 1987 Great Britain GBR 4 Semifinal 2 London 7 August 2012
168 12.79 1,5 Nicole Ramalalanirina 5 Mar 1972 France FRA 3 Heat 2 Sydney 25 September 2000
169 12.80 0 Natalya Lebedeva 24 Aug 1949 Soviet Union URS 3 Final Montreal 29 July 1976
170 12.80 0 Delloreen Ennis 5 Mar 1975 Jamaica JAM 4 Final Sydney 27 September 2000
171 12.80 0,7 Angie Thorp 7 Dec 1972 Great Britain GBR 5 Semifinal 1 Atlanta 31 July 1996
172 12.80 1,5 Delloreen Ennis 5 Mar 1975 Jamaica JAM 4 Heat 2 Sydney 25 September 2000
173 12.81 -0,9 Reina-Flor Okori 2 May 1980 France FRA 1 Heat 5 Athens 22 August 2004
174 12.81 -0,8 Olga Shishigina 23 Dec 1968 Kazakhstan KAZ 1 Heat 3 Sydney 25 September 2000
175 12.81 0 LaVonna Martin-Floréal 18 Nov 1966 United States USA 1 Semifinal 2 Barcelona 6 August 1992
176 12.81 0,2 Dionne Rose-Henley 7 Nov 1969 Jamaica JAM 2 Heat 5 Atlanta 29 July 1996
177 12.81 0,4 Natalya Grigoryeva 3 Dec 1962 Soviet Union URS 3 Semifinal 2 Seoul 30 September 1988
178 12.81 0,6 Lucie Škrobáková 4 Jan 1982 Czech Republic CZE 4 Semifinal 3 London 7 August 2012
179 12.81 1,3 Kerstin Knabe 7 Jul 1959 East Germany GDR 3 Heat 1 Seoul 29 September 1988
180 12.81 1,5 Angela Whyte 22 May 1980 Canada CAN 6 Final Athens 24 August 2004
181 12.81 1,9 Reina-Flor Okori 2 May 1980 France FRA 6 Semifinal 2 Athens 23 August 2004
182 12.81 0,4 Megan Simmonds 18 Mar 1994   JAM 2 Heat 6 Rio de Janeiro 16 August 2016
183 12.82 -1,5 LaVonna Martin-Floréal 18 Nov 1966 United States USA 1 Heat 1 Barcelona 5 August 1992
184 12.82 -0,9 Irina Shevchenko 2 Sep 1975 Russia RUS 2 Heat 5 Athens 22 August 2004
185 12.82 -0,1 Delloreen Ennis 5 Mar 1975 Jamaica JAM 1 Heat 3 Beijing 17 August 2008
186 12.82 0 LaVonna Martin-Floréal 18 Nov 1966 United States USA 1 Heat 4 Barcelona 5 August 1992
187 12.82 0 Gudrun Berend 27 Apr 1955 East Germany GDR 4 Final Montreal 29 July 1976
188 12.82 0,2 Katie Anderson 9 Jan 1968 Canada CAN 1 Heat 2 Sydney 25 September 2000
189 12.82 0,2 Tiffany Porter 13 Nov 1987   GBR 4 Semifinal 1 Rio de Janeiro 17 August 2016
190 12.83 -0,9 Brigitte Foster-Hylton 7 Nov 1974 Jamaica JAM 1 Heat 2 Athens 22 August 2004
191 12.83 -0,8 Gail Devers 19 Nov 1966 United States USA 1 Heat 4 Atlanta 29 July 1996
192 12.83 -0,1 Sally Pearson 19 Sep 1986 Australia AUS 2 Heat 3 Beijing 17 August 2008
193 12.83 0 Aliuska López 29 Aug 1969 Cuba CUB 5 Final Sydney 27 September 2000
194 12.83 0,4 Phylicia George 16 Nov 1987 Canada CAN 2 Heat 6 London 6 August 2012
195 12.83 0,9 Beate Schrott 15 Apr 1988 Austria AUT 2 Semifinal 1 London 7 August 2012
196 12.83 0,9 Shermaine Williams 4 Feb 1990 Jamaica JAM 3 Semifinal 1 London 7 August 2012
197 12.83 -0,2 Phylicia George 16 Nov 1987   CAN 2 Heat 2 Rio de Janeiro 16 August 2016
198 12.84 -1,6 Glory Alozie 30 Dec 1977 Nigeria NGR 2 Heat 1 Sydney 25 September 2000
199 12.84 -0,9 Olena Krasovska 17 Jun 1976 Ukraine UKR 3 Heat 5 Athens 22 August 2004
200 12.84 -0,7 Benita Fitzgerald-Brown 6 Jul 1961 United States USA 1 Final Los Angeles 10 August 1984
201 12.84 -0,6 Anay Tejeda 3 Apr 1983 Cuba CUB 2 Heat 4 Beijing 17 August 2008
202 12.84 0 Valeria Stefanescu 7 Oct 1946 Romania ROU 1 Semifinal 1 Munich 7 September 1972
203 12.84 0,2 Sarah Claxton 23 Sep 1979 Great Britain GBR 4 Semifinal 2 Beijing 18 August 2008
204 12.84 0,8 Valeria Stefanescu 7 Oct 1946 Romania ROU 2 Final Munich 8 September 1972
205 12.84 0,9 Melissa Morrison-Howard 9 Jul 1971 United States USA 2 Semifinal 1 Sydney 27 September 2000
206 12.84 0,9 Alina Talay 14 May 1989 Belarus BLR 4 Semifinal 1 London 7 August 2012
207 12.84 0,9 Irina Litovchenko 29 May 1950 Soviet Union URS 6 Final Moscow 28 July 1980
208 12.84 1,1 Glory Alozie 30 Dec 1977 Nigeria NGR 1 Heat 4 Sydney 25 September 2000
209 12.84 1,2 Irina Litovchenko 29 May 1950 Soviet Union URS 3 Semifinal 2 Moscow 28 July 1980
210 12.84 1,4 Yordanka Donkova 28 Sep 1961 Bulgaria BUL 1 Heat 2 Barcelona 5 August 1992
211 12.84 1,5 Svetla Pishtikova 27 Jan 1970 Bulgaria BUL 4 Heat 1 Atlanta 29 July 1996
212 12.84 1,7 Patricia Girard 8 Apr 1968 France FRA 2 Heat 2 Atlanta 29 July 1996
213 12.84 0,9 Nadine Hildebrand 20 Sep 1987   GER 2 Heat 3 Rio de Janeiro 16 August 2016
 
  Pefomances annulled cause of doping
  12.58   Nevin Yanit 16 Feb 1986 Turkey TUR 5 Final London 7 August 2012
  12.58   Nevin Yanit 16 Feb 1986 Turkey TUR 2 Semifinal 3 London 7 August 2012
  12.67   Nataliya Shekhodanova 29 Dec 1971 Russia RUS 3 Semifinal 3 Atlanta 31 July 1996
  12.68   Nataliya Shekhodanova 29 Dec 1971 Russia RUS 2 Quarter-Finals Heat Two Atlanta 29 July 1996
  12.70   Nevin Yanit 16 Feb 1986 Turkey TUR 1 Heat 4 London 6 August 2012
  12.80   Nataliya Shekhodanova 29 Dec 1971 Russia RUS 7 Final Atlanta 31 July 1996