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2004 Olympic Games Athens - Men's 800 m

 

 

Host City: Athina, Greece Format: Top two in each heat and next two fastest advanced to the final.
Date Started: August 25, 2004 Format: Top two in each heat and next six fastest advanced to the semi-finals.
Date Finished: August 28, 2004  
(Competitors: 72; Countries: 60; Finalists: 8)  
    Venue(s): Olympic Stadium, Athens Olympic Sports Complex Spiros Loues, Maroussi
Overview by IAAF    2004-athens-stadium.jpg
With nine heats, the first round qualification was rigorous; only the first two in each heat were guaranteed a place in the semi-finals. Youssef Saäd Kamel (formerly Gregory Konchellah, son of former World champion Billy) was one of the possible winners picked by prognosticators, but he placed third in his heat in 1:46.94, when 1:45.94 was the slowest losing qualifying time. Winners of the semi-finals were Algeria’s reigning World Champion Saïd-Guerni (1:45.76), Bungei (1:44.18) ahead of Borzakovskiy (1:44.29), and Kipketer (1:44.62). Borzakovskiy, noted for his habit of hanging at the back of the field, was given a let-off in the final when the pace was moderate as Bungei was unwilling to commit himself fully to pacemaking. Instead Saïd- Guerni led at halfway in 51.84. Bungei went into the lead at 500m, and led until 700m, when Kipketer flowed by with Mulaudzi in tow, while Borzakovskiy lagged in fifth place. Then the inevitable surge came from the Russian, and he took the lead with 20m to go and won pulling away. Kipketer added a bronze to his 2000 silver, and Sepeng placed sixth in his third final.
       
Summary by Sports-reference.com      
There were 72 entries and nine heats in round one, making the opening round tough sledding to qualify for the semi-finals. The semis were won by Wilson Kipketer (DEN), Yury Borzakovsky (RUS), 2003 World silver medalist, and Kenya’s Wilfred Bungei. Algeria’s Djabir Saïd-Guerni, 2003 World Champion, led the finalists thru the first lap in 51.84. Bungei went ahead at 500 metres and led until Kipketer passed him at the top of final straight, with Borzakovsky then in fifth place. But he was known for his kick and it did not fail him, Borzakovsky flying by the field down the stretch to win the gold medal. Kipketer faded near the end and was beaten for the silver medal by South African Mbulaeni Mulaudzi.
 

Records

Prior to the competition, the existing World and Olympic records were as follows.

World record  Wilson Kipketer (DEN) 1:41.11 Cologne, Germany 24 August 1997
Olympic record  Vebjørn Rodal (NOR) 1:42.58 Atlanta, United States 29 July 1996

No new records were set during the competition.

Qualification

The qualification period for athletics was 1 January 2003 to 9 August 2004. For the men's 800 metres, each National Olympic Committee was permitted to enter up to three athletes that had run the race in 1:46.00 or faster during the qualification period. If an NOC had no athletes that qualified under that standard, one athlete that had run the race in 1:47.00 or faster could be entered.
 
        Results        

The men's 800 metres at the 2004 Summer Olympics as part of the athletics program were held at the Athens Olympic Stadium from August 25 to 28.

The first round had split a full roster of runners into nine heats with the first two gaining a direct qualification and then the next six fastest across all heats advancing to the semifinals. The top two runners in each of the three semifinal heats moved on directly to the final, and they were immediately joined by the next two fastest from any of the semifinals.

The final was tactical, like the previous several Olympics with most athletes running faster to qualify than they ran in the final. Yuriy Borzakovskiy and Mouhssin Chehibi lagged significantly off the pace. World champion Djabir Saïd-Guerni and 2004 world leader Wilfred Bungei battled for the lead, chased closely by Bungei's second cousin, world record holder Wilson Kipketer, Borzakovskiy and Chehibi joined the back of the pack. It seemed like Borzakovskiy was reluctant to catch the leaders, then realized the pace was not too fast, with 50 metres before the end of the first lap, he noticeably accelerated from dead last to join the fight. Mbulaeni Mulaudzi, who had lucked into the slowest qualifying time in the semi final round, ran comfortably in a box inside of Kipketer through 500 meters. A lead group broke away on the backstretch. Guerni fell back as the cousins battled for the lead through the final turn, with Mulaudzi a step back and Borzakovskiy the final athlete in the breakaway. Coming off the turn, Kipketer pounced and took off for the finish in lane two. But the always fast closing Borzakovskiy came along the outside from 5 meters back to catch Kipketer 30 meters out. Not giving up the fight, Mulaudzi pulled even with Kipketer. Borzakovskiy held his hands up with a meter victory, while Mulaudzi out leaned Kipketer for silver
28 AUG 2004 General News

Men's 800m Final

With a brilliantly executed kick, Yuriy Borzakovskiy silenced the critics that have shadowed his career with his gold medal run in the 800 metres.

Sixth at the bell and fourth heading into the final straight, the 23-year-old reached the line in 1:44.45 to claim the first individual gold medal for the Russian squad.

“I am just very happy to win this medal,” Borzakovskiy said.

Since his win at the 2001 IAAF World Indoor Championships as a 19-year-old, Borzakovskiy was widely hailed as the likely successor to World record holder Wilson Kipketer, who had dominated the event for much of the previous decade. But his inconsistent racing styles and unorthodox tactics led to as many big wins as it did frustrating losses. But on the sport’s biggest stage, the Russian champion’s sit-and-kick strategy worked.

Despite a season shortened by injury and illness, Mbulaeni Mulaudzi of South Africa, this year’s World Indoor champion, held off Kipketer to claim the silver, edging the Dane,1:44.61 to 1:44.65.

“Deep down inside I knew I had the capacity to win a medal,” said Mulaudzi, “but I didn’t expect it to happen. I just had to do it.”

For Kipketer, a three-time World champion and world standard-bearer in the event, his attempt for an Olympic gold medal once again fell short.

“I was too slow in the first 400,” said Kipketer, who took the silver in 2000. “I could have risked it for the gold medal because I was in good condition for a better position.”

Djabir Said-Guerni, the 2003 World Champion, had a hesitant lead at the break, with World leader Wilfred Bungei tailing closely 300 metres into the race. Kipketer and Mulaudzi were following a step behind. When the Algerian reached the half in 51.84, Bungei decided to up the tempo, and jumped to the front.

“When I saw that it was 51.8, I knew it was too slow, so I had to take it,” Bungei said. With 200 to go, Kipketer moved in even with Bungei, briefly making it a two-man race. But Borzakovskiy, timing his finish perfectly, ran wide off the final bend, picking off his competitors one-by-one.

Moroccan Mouhssin Chehibi completed his coming out party in Athens, finishing fourth in 1:45.16, in front of Bungei’s 1:45.31. Running in his third Olympics, Hezekiel Sepeng was sixth, clocking 1:45.53.

“Yes, it was very disappointing,” the South African, who won the silver medal in 1996, said. “But this was Yuriy’s kind of race. And he ran a terrific race.”

Fading down the final stretch, Said Guerni  drifted to seventh, clocking 1:45.61.

800 m Men     Final 28 August
     
                 
Rank Mark     Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 1.44.45     Yuriy Borzakovskiy Russia RUS 12 Apr 81  
2 1.44.61     Mbulaeni Mulaudzi South Africa RSA 8 Sep 80  
3 1.44.65     Wilson Kipketer Denmark DEN 12 Dec 70  
4 1.45.16     Mohcine Chehibi Morocco MAR 28 Jan 78  
5 1.45.31     Wilfred Bungei Kenya KEN 24 Jul 80  
6 1.45.53     Hezekiél Sepeng South Africa RSA 30 Jun 74  
7 1.45.61     Djabir Saïd-Guerni Algeria ALG 29 Mar 77  
8 1.52.49     Ahmad Ismail Sudan SUD 10 Sep 84  
26 AUG 2004 General News

Men's 800m - Semi-Finals

With yet another comfortable win, Wilson Kipketer’s steady march towards elusive Olympic glory continued in the semi-finals of the men’s 800 metres.

Running a confident and relaxed race, the World record holder and three-time World champion ran to a 1:44.63 victory in the second semi-final, nearly a second ahead of surprisingly strong Ismail Ahmed Ismail (1:45.45) of Sudan to advance easily into Saturday evening’s final. As he did in the first round, Brazilian Osmar dos Santos jumped to the early lead, and paced the field though the first half in 50.83, the quickest opening lap of the night. He was closely shadowed by Kipketer, with U.S. champion Jonathan Johnson just a step behind. But with the pack tightening, the young American found himself in trouble, and quickly fell off the pace. The 19-year-old Ismail, last year’s Arab champion, moved up as he headed up the back stretch and firmly held his ground to the finish, well ahead of Kenyan Joseph Mutua (1:45.54) and Italy’s Andrea Longo (1:45.97).

Heat two was considerably faster, with World leader Wilfred Bungei bringing a tight six-man pack through the bell in 51.35. While Dutchman Bram Som was shadowing the Kenyan, Russian Yuriy Borzakovskiy made his first attack, moving from seventh position into fourth, and tucking in behind South African Hezekiel Sepeng, the 1996 silver medallist. Borzakovskiy dropped back briefly as he headed into the final straight, only to shift gears again moments later to charge into second place to secure the automatic spot behind winner Bungei, who clocked 1:44.28. The Russian was just 1/100 of a second behind. With a solid sustained kick over the final 60 metres, Mouhssin Chehibi of Morocco finished third in 1:44.62, a personal best by more than a second. Sepeng held on for fourth in 1:44.75. Chehibi and Sepeng gained the final two non-automatic qualifiers.

In the first heat, Djabir Said Guerni, the last to qualify from yesterday’s first round, avoided a repeat performance and near disaster by jumping to the lead just 300 meters into the race. The reigning World champion stayed there, and reached the line in 1:45.76. But behind him, Mbulaeni Mulaudzi and Antonio Manuel Reina waged a fierce homestretch battle for the second spot, with the South African, this year’s World Indoor champion, ultimately gaining the upper hand. Mulaudzi reached the line in 1:46.09, less than a tenth of a second ahead of the Spaniard. 1500 finalist Ivan Heshko was a distant fourth in 1:46.66.

800 m Men     Semifinal 1 26 August      
                 
Rank Mark     Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 1.45.76   Q Djabir Saïd-Guerni Algeria ALG 29 Mar 77  
2 1.46.09   Q Mbulaeni Mulaudzi South Africa RSA 8 Sep 80  
3 1.46.17     Antonio Manuel Reina Spain ESP 13 Jun 81  
4 1.46.66     Ivan Heshko Ukraine UKR 19 Aug 79  
5 1.47.14     Nicolas Aïssat France FRA 24 Jul 80  
6 1.47.40     Berhanu Alemu Ethiopia ETH 16 Jul 82  
7 1.47.53     Amine Laâlou Morocco MAR 13 May 82  
8 1.47.68     René Herms Germany GER 17 Jul 82  
800 m Men     Semifinal 2 26 August      
                 
Rank Mark     Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 1.44.28   Q Wilfred Bungei Kenya KEN 24 Jul 80  
2 1.44.29   Q Yuriy Borzakovskiy Russia RUS 12 Apr 81  
3 1.44.62   Q Mohcine Chehibi Morocco MAR 28 Jan 78  
4 1.44.75   Q Hezekiél Sepeng South Africa RSA 30 Jun 74  
5 1.45.52     Bram Som Netherlands NED 20 Feb 80  
6 1.46.62     Dmitrijs Miļkevičs Latvia LAT 6 Dec 81  
7 1.47.38     Gary Reed Canada CAN 25 Oct 81  
  DQ     Samuel Mwera Chegere Tanzania TAN 3 Jun 85  
800 m Men     Semifinal 3 26 August      
                 
Rank Mark     Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 1.44.63   Q Wilson Kipketer Denmark DEN 12 Dec 70  
2 1.45.45   Q Ahmad Ismail Sudan SUD 10 Sep 84  
3 1.45.54     Joseph Mutua Kenya KEN 10 Dec 78  
4 1.45.97     Andrea Longo Italy ITA 26 Jun 75  
5 1.46.15     Jean-Patrick Nduwimana Burundi BDI 9 Mar 78  
6 1.46.74     Ricky Soos Great Britain GBR 28 Jun 83  
7 1.48.23     Osmar dos Santos Brazil BRA 20 Oct 68  
8 1.50.10     Jonathan Johnson United States USA 5 Mar 82  
25 AUG 2004 General News

Men's 800m - Heats

With only the top two from each of the nine heats - from a total of 72 entrants! - guaranteed entry into the semi-finals, some quick times and battles for position were in store.

Leading all qualifiers was World record holder Wilson Kipketer, whose 1:44.69 win appeared effortless, boding well for the Dane’s quest to win the only trophy missing from his trophy room -an Olympic gold medal.

Brazilian Osmar dos Santos took the early lead, bringing the field through the midway point in a snappy 50.93. Jonathan Johnson, the U.S. champion and a strong front runner, took over just past the bell with Kipketer just a step behind, composed, and ready to strike. The three-time World champion did with just under 200 metres to go, winning handily. Johnson held on for second (1:45.31), holding off Jean Patrick Nduwimana (1:45:38) of Burundi. Dos Santos, bronze medallist at the IAAF World Indoor Championships in March, was fourth in 1:45.90, and moved on to the semi finals.

South African Mbulaeni Mulaudzi, this year’s World Indoor champion, got things rolling in heat one, making his decisive move heading into the final straight. First passing Kenyan Michael Rotich then catching Rene Herms, the South African reached the line for a 1:45.72 win. The German, who ran a breakthrough race in Munich earlier this month, was second in 1:45.83. Rotich did not advance.

In the second heat, Kenyan Joseph Mutua led the field through the bell and hung on to win in 1:45.65. Briton Ricky Soos, third after 400 metres, snuck by reigning World champion Djabir Said Guerni to finish second and automatically advance. He clocked a personal best 1:45.70, ahead of Said Guerni’s 1:45.94. The Algerian would ultimately become the last to advance on time.

Tanzanian Mwera Samwel fought for the early lead in heat four - after he visibly ran out of his lane in the first 100 meters - before World leader Wilfred Bungei took over for good just before the bell. Sudan’s Ismail Ahmed Ismail tailed closely, and finished second in 1:45.17. Samwel, third in 1:45.30, advanced as well. Frenchman Nicholas Aissat (1:45.31) and Dutchman Bram Som (1:45.72) were also among the qualifiers.

After sitting well back for most of the race, Yuriy Borzakovskiy took the lead heading in to the homestraight to win heat five. The Russian clocked 1:46.20, just ahead of Ethiopian Berhanu Alemu (1:46.26).

In heat six, Iranian Sadjad Moradi lead the field through the bell, with Moroccan Amine Laloou a step behind, and American veteran Khadevis Robinson third. With Moradi dropping back, Laalou and Robinson briefly led heading into the back straight. Ivan Heskho, less than 24 hours after his fifth place finish in the 1500m, made his dash for home, snuck through on the inside to finish second to the Moroccan, 1:45.88 to 1:45.92.

With the advantage of racing in the waning heats, the late races were expected to be strong battles for fast times. But they weren’t.

Fittingly for a race that remained tight until the homestretch, Latvian Dmitrijs Milkevics and Antonio Manuel Reina of Spain tied for the win in heat seven, each credited with a 1:46.66. Florent Lacasse of France, leading until the final 50 metres, dropped back to third in 1:46.91, and did not advance.

2001 World champion Andre Bucher and 1996 Olympic silver medallist Hezekiel Sepeng took command of things in heat eight, with Italian hope Andrea Longo and Spainard Manuel Olmedo trailing single file. The South African assumed the lead at the bell, with Longo moving with him. Olmedo jumped to a brief lead with 220 metres to go, before Longo (1:46.75) and Sepeng (1:46.82) regained control and claimed the top two spots.

In heat nine, Glody Dube of Botswana took the initial lead, followed by Kenyan-born Bahraini Youssef Saad Kamel and Gary Reed, the recently-minted Canadian record holder. When Dube dropped back, Kamel, who ran a short-lived world leading 1:43.11 in the Zurich ‘B’ race, looked strongest. But Reed, and Mouhssin Chehibi of Morocco, ambushed Kamel in the homestretch to become the last two automatic qualifiers, with Reed winning in 1:46.74 to Chehibi’s 1:46.77.

800 m Men     Heat 1 25 August      
                 
Rank Mark     Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 1.45.72   Q Mbulaeni Mulaudzi South Africa RSA 8 Sep 80  
2 1.45.83   Q René Herms Germany GER 17 Jul 82  
3 1.46.24     Lee Jae-Hoon South Korea KOR 28 Nov 76  
4 1.46.35     Arthémon Hatungimana Burundi BDI 21 Jan 74  
5 1.46.42     Michael Rotich Kenya KEN 14 Jul 78  
6 1.49.64     Nazar Begliyev Turkmenistan TKM 27 Apr 80  
7 1.51.11     Alibey Sükürov Azerbaijan AZE 2 May 77  
8 1.51.87     Fadrique Iglesias Bolivia BOL 12 Oct 80  
800 m Men     Heat 2 25 August      
                 
Rank Mark     Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 1.45.65   Q Joseph Mutua Kenya KEN 10 Dec 78  
2 1.45.70   Q Ricky Soos Great Britain GBR 28 Jun 83  
3 1.45.94   Q Djabir Saïd-Guerni Algeria ALG 29 Mar 77  
4 1.46.63     Achraf Tadili Canada CAN 8 Jul 80  
5 1.46.97     David Fiegen Luxembourg LUX 3 Sep 84  
6 1.47.38     Mindaugas Norbutas Lithuania LTU 24 Aug 76  
7 1.47.69     Panayiótis Stroubákos Greece GRE 8 Sep 72  
8 1.49.81     Le Van Duong Vietnam VIE 21 Sep 85 NJR NR
800 m Men     Heat 3 25 August      
                 
Rank Mark     Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 1.44.69   Q Wilson Kipketer Denmark DEN 12 Dec 70  
2 1.45.31   Q Jonathan Johnson United States USA 5 Mar 82  
3 1.45.38   Q Jean-Patrick Nduwimana Burundi BDI 9 Mar 78  
4 1.45.90   Q Osmar dos Santos Brazil BRA 20 Oct 68  
5 1.46.24     Jason Stewart New Zealand NZL 21 Nov 81  
6 1.46.71     João Pires Portugal POR 10 Jun 79  
7 1.49.59     Jasmin Salihović Bosnia and Herzegovina BIH 18 Feb 80  
8 1.54.25     Jean Sekpona Togo TOG 20 Jun 87  
800 m Men     Heat 4 25 August      
                 
Rank Mark     Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 1.44.84   Q Wilfred Bungei Kenya KEN 24 Jul 80  
2 1.45.17   Q Ahmad Ismail Sudan SUD 10 Sep 84  
3 1.45.30   Q Samuel Mwera Chegere Tanzania TAN 3 Jun 85 NJR
4 1.45.31   Q Nicolas Aïssat France FRA 24 Jul 80  
5 1.45.72   Q Bram Som Netherlands NED 20 Feb 80  
6 1.47.36     Mikhail Kolganov Kazakhstan KAZ 9 May 80  
7 1.47.67     Mohamed Mutlak Al-Azimi Kuwait KUW 16 Jun 82  
8 1.48.28     Erkinjon Isakov Uzbekistan UZB 25 Nov 74  
800 m Men     Heat 5 25 August      
                 
Rank Mark     Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 1.46.20   Q Yuriy Borzakovskiy Russia RUS 12 Apr 81  
2 1.46.26   Q Berhanu Alemu Ethiopia ETH 16 Jul 82  
3 1.46.32     Miguel Quesada Spain ESP 18 Sep 79  
4 1.46.66     Joeri Jansen Belgium BEL 28 May 79  
5 1.47.87     Paskar Owor Uganda UGA 22 Dec 80  
6 1.48.15     Moise Joseph Haiti HAI 27 Dec 81  
7 1.49.08     Isireli Naikelekelevesi Fiji FIJ 17 Dec 76  
8 1.49.87     Kondawi Chiwina Malawi MAW 22 Oct 79  
800 m Men     Heat 6 25 August      
                 
Rank Mark     Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 1.45.88   Q Amine Laâlou Morocco MAR 13 May 82  
2 1.45.92   Q Ivan Heshko Ukraine UKR 19 Aug 79  
3 1.46.14     Khadevis Robinson United States USA 19 Jul 76  
4 1.47.03     Dmitriy Bogdanov Russia RUS 11 Apr 79  
5 1.47.52     Nabil Madi Algeria ALG 9 Jun 81  
6 1.47.83     Selahattin Çobanoğlu Turkey TUR 20 Aug 85  
7 1.49.49     Sadjad Moradi Iran IRI 30 Mar 83  
8 1.57.08     Andy Grant Saint Vincent and the Grenadines VIN 7 Jun 84  
800 m Men     Heat 7 25 August      
                 
Rank Mark     Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 1.46.66   Q Dmitrijs Miļkevičs Latvia LAT 6 Dec 81  
1 1.46.66   Q Antonio Manuel Reina Spain ESP 13 Jun 81  
3 1.46.91     Florent Lacasse France FRA 21 Jan 81  
4 1.47.92     Majid Saeed Sultan Qatar QAT 3 Nov 86  
5 1.47.95     Abdoulaye Wagne Senegal SEN 30 Jan 81  
6 1.48.42     Mohammed Al-Salhi Saudi Arabia KSA 11 May 86  
7 1.49.25     Ramil Aritkulov Russia RUS 1 Mar 78  
8 1.51.76     Ali Al-Balooshi United Arab Emirates UAE 4 Aug 87  
800 m Men     Heat 8 25 August      
                 
Rank Mark     Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 1.46.75   Q Andrea Longo Italy ITA 26 Jun 75  
2 1.46.82   Q Hezekiél Sepeng South Africa RSA 30 Jun 74  
3 1.47.34     André Bucher Switzerland SUI 19 Oct 76  
4 1.47.71     Manuel Olmedo Spain ESP 17 May 83  
5 1.47.89     Michal Šneberger Czech Republic CZE 23 Jun 78  
6 1.48.12     Sherridan Kirk Trinidad and Tobago TTO 11 Feb 81  
7 1.49.02     Vanco Stojanov FYRO Macedonia MKD 9 Nov 77  
8 1.53.86     Abdesalam Al-Dabaji Palestine PLE 24 Apr 79  
800 m Men     Heat 9 25 August      
                 
Rank Mark     Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 1.46.74   Q Gary Reed Canada CAN 25 Oct 81  
2 1.46.77   Q Mohcine Chehibi Morocco MAR 28 Jan 78  
3 1.46.94     Youssef Saad Kamel Bahrain BRN 29 Mar 81  
4 1.47.60     Derrick Peterson United States USA 28 Nov 77  
5 1.48.25     Glody Dube Botswana BOT 2 Jul 78  
6 1.48.36     Prince Mumba Zambia ZAM 28 Aug 84  
7 1.48.42     Byron Piedra Ecuador ECU 9 Aug 82  
8 2.00.06     Cornelis Sibe Suriname SUR 22 Apr 83  

 

 

 

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