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2004 Olympic Games Athens - Women's 200 m

 

 

Host City: Athina, Greece Format: Top four in each heat advanced to the final.
Date Started: August 23, 2004 Format: Top three in each heat and next four fastest advanced to the semi-finals.
Date Finished: August 25, 2004 Format: Top four in each heat and next four fastest advanced to the quarter-finals.
(Competitors: 42; Countries: 32; Finalists: 8)  
    Venue(s): Olympic Stadium, Athens Olympic Sports Complex Spiros Loues, Maroussi
Overview by IAAF    2004-athens-stadium.jpg
The fewest competitors for 20 years did not detract from a close competition. Felix (22.39 in round 1) and Campbell (22.49 in round 2) were the only athletes to dip below 22.50 before the semi-finals. These two shaped up as the likely protagonists for the gold. Felix won the first race in 22.36, and Campbell set herself up as the favourite with her lifetime best of 22.13, ahead of Bailey’s 22.33 in the other semi-final. Merlene Ottey, who won her first 200m Olympic medal before five of the finalists were born, pulled up injured in the semi-final, which was her 53rd Olympic race. Campbell, aware of Felix’s strength in the last 50m, bolted out of the blocks and was nearly two metres clear coming off the curve. Felix finished more than a metre clear of Ferguson and Bailey, setting an official world junior record of 22.18 in the process, but could not close to within a metre of Campbell, as all of the top four ran their second 100 in 11.0.
       
Summary by Sports-reference.com      
Jamaica's Veronica Campbell had not lost in this event in four years, but her competition had mostly been at the collegiate level in the United States, and she had not been world ranked in the 200 prior to 2000. She was considered a slight favorite over American Allyson Felix, an 18-year-old who had quickly become the top 200 metre runner in the US. The final held form as Campbell took the lead with a strong curve and was never caught. Felix closed quickly to get the silver medal but was over a metre back at the line. Her 22.18 was a world junior record. The bronze medal went to the 2002 Commonwealth champion, Debbie Ferguson of the Bahamas.
 

Records

Prior to the competition, the existing World and Olympic records were as follows.

World record  Florence Griffith-Joyner (USA) 21.34 s Seoul, South Korea 29 September 1988
Olympic record  Florence Griffith-Joyner (USA) 21.34 s Seoul, South Korea 29 September 1988

No new records were set during the competition.

Qualification

The qualification period for athletics took place from 1 January 2003 to 9 August 2004. For the women's 200 metres, each National Olympic Committee was permitted to enter up to three athletes that had run the race in 22.97 seconds or faster during the qualification period. If an NOC had no athletes that qualified under that standard, one athlete that had run the race in 23.12 seconds or faster could be entered.
 
        Results        

The women's 200 metres at the 2004 Summer Olympics as part of the athletics program were held at the Athens Olympic Stadium from August 24 to 26.

The top four runners in each of the initial seven heats automatically qualified for the second round. The next four fastest runners from across the heats also qualified. Those 32 runners competed in four heats in the second round, with the top three from each heat and the four next fastest overall advancing to the semifinals. In two semifinal heats, only the top four runners from each heat moved on to the final.

Leading up to the Olympic final, Jamaica's Veronica Campbell was considered a pre-race favorite of this event, as she had previously managed to beat her own world leading time in the semifinals. She was also expected to challenge the youngster Allyson Felix, who had quickly become the top medal contender for the Americans. From the blocks, Campbell took a commanding lead with a strong curve and kept her form in the last few strides of the track to hold off a charge from Felix for the Olympic title at 22.05 seconds. Felix closed the race quickly to get the silver medal and set the world junior record. On the outside, Bahamian sprinter Debbie Ferguson was immediately chased by Campbell's teammate Aleen Bailey, but the places were clearly decided.
25 AUG 2004 General News Athens, Greece

Women's 200m Final

At age 22, Veronica Campbell tonight did what her former compatriot Merlene Ottey tried and failed to do at six Olympic Games – win Jamaica’s first ever individual sprint gold medal. Campbell, a double World junior sprint champion from 2000, won the Olympic 200m title this evening in commanding style.

“I’ve been dreaming all my life to get an individual Olympic medal and today I did it,” she said. “I’m very proud.”

Her winning time, 22.06, was a personal best by seven hundredths. Twelve hundredths behind her was USA’s 18 year-old sensation Allyson Felix whose time is a new World Junior record, one hundredth inside the previous mark which has stood to Russia’s Natalya Bochina for 24 years.

Commonwealth Games champion Debbie Ferguson of the Bahamas made a late dash for third, and took the bronze in 22.30, just edging out Campbell’s compatriot Aleen Bailey.

Campbell was one of Ottey’s teammates in the Jamaican 4x100m relay squad that won a silver medal in Sydney four years ago. Then, just 18, she ran the second leg of a final remembered most for the fact that the USA, with Marion Jones on anchor, didn’t win. Indeed, it was Ferguson who crossed the line first, with Ottey holding off Jones desperate efforts for the silver.

Campbell’s double triumph in Chile the following month suggested she would be one to watch in future years. At 23.20 this evening she turned that potential into gold.

Campbell had a pre-race plan and executed it too perfection. Running in lane four, one outside of Felix, she knew she would have to get out fast. Bailey, who spent her last moments before being called to the blocks shadow boxing like a female Mohammed Ali, was two lanes outside her, with Ferguson running blind in lane eight.

Campbell blasted out of the blocks and ran a storming bend. But Felix was chasing her hard. Bailey also got away quickly, making ground on Ferguson. As they swung into the straight Campbell had two metres on Felix but the American began to make ground. With 50m to go Bailey began to falter as Ferguson finished strongly on the outside.

Felix was hunting Campbell down but the Jamaican had enough strength to come home ahead. She threw her arms wide as she broke the line before turning to embrace Bailey. The two gathered a Jamaica flag for a joint lap of honour.

“I studied the others’ races, especially to beat Allyson,” said Campbell afterwards. “That’s why I took off at the start and ran a hard curve. I knew the perfect race would win for sure.”

Felix will have seen the initials WJR light up on the stadium’s giant scoreboard with a mixture of delight and amusement. Aged 17, she had burst onto the international senior scene back in May 2003 by running 22.11 in Mexico City, but the time couldn’t be ratified as a reocrd because no drugs test was carried out.

“Running such a fast race was very exciting,” said Felix, who was gracious in defeat. “She [Campbell] got out well and ran a great curve and I couldn’t make it up. I can’t wait for the future. Running fast is a long process, I’ll just have ot be patient. I’m gradually accepting the fact that I’m the future of USA women’s sprinting.”

Ferguson, the bronze medallist commented- "I felt really inspired by Tonique Williams victory yesterday. I had to fight really hard because I was the oldest of the young ladies out there. Per capita the Bahamas have already won the Olympic Games."

200 m Women     Final 25 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 22.05 0,8   Veronica Campbell-Brown Jamaica JAM 15 May 82  
2 22.18 0,8   Allyson Felix United States USA 18 Nov 85 WJR
3 22.30 0,8   Debbie Ferguson McKenzie Bahamas BAH 16 Jan 76  
4 22.42 0,8   Aleen Bailey Jamaica JAM 25 Nov 80  
5 22.57 0,8   Ivet Lalova-Collio Bulgaria BUL 18 May 84  
6 22.84 0,8   Kim Gevaert Belgium BEL 5 Aug 78  
7 22.87 0,8   Abi Oyepitan Great Britain GBR 30 Dec 79  
7 22.87 0,8   Muna Lee United States USA 30 Oct 81  
24 AUG 2004 General News

Women's 200m - Semi-Finals

When the Olympic Games in Sydney finished late in the 2000 season, most athletes headed home for a well-earned rest. Not Veronica Campbell. She’d been part of the Jamaican sprint relay team that won a silver medal. Then aged 18, she went on to Chile, where she won a blistering sprint double at the IAAF World Junior championships. She was earmarked from that moment as one to watch, a potential champion of the future.

But it’s only been this year that she’s really started to challenge the best in the senior world and arrived in Athens with the best 200m time in the world this year, 22.18. After taking a 100m bronze on Saturday, she tonight made herself an even firmer favourite for the longer sprint by clocking 22.13, a personal best and the fastest in the world in 2004.

She and her teammate Aleen Bailey, finishing second, two tenths of a second behind her, then danced a jig of joy at the side of the track in celebration at making their second final. Bailey also ran a personal best, while Kim Gevaert, in third, broke her own Belgian record with 22.48, running in lane two.

The double Commonwealth Games champion Debbie Ferguson was the fourth qualifier from the group, running 22.49. While Cydonie Mothersill of the Cayman Islands, who’d looked impressive in the earlier rounds, missed out.

Allyson Felix is another of the new generation who has come to the fore this year. Her best, 22.28, is second to Campbell on the world list. And it was she who won the first semi in similarly commanding fashion.

Felix ran a powerful bend in lane three and pulled clear of France’s relay golden girl Christine Arron, struggling to make up the ground a lane inside her. Felix led a strong field home in 22.36, winning by two tenths from the surprise finallist Abe Oyepitan. The Briton came within six hundredths of her best of 22.50, recording the same time as Bulgaria’s Ivet Lalova. Felix’s teammate Muna Lee was fourth with Arron a disappointing seventh.

This race may also have been a sad climax to one of the greatest Olympic careers. Merlene Ottey, the former Jamaican who now runs for Slovenia, started in lane seven but the holder of a record eight Olympic medals never made it into the home straight of what could be her final Olympic race.

The 44 year-old pulled up hobbling after 70 metres, apparently injured. Is this the last time we’ll see her? Well, perhaps on an Olympic stage, but in a press conference last week the veteran said she intends to run at the European Championships in 2006.

When asked if this would be her final Olympics she laughed and said: “I have been asked that every time since Barcelona. I have said ‘yes’, sometimes, and ‘maybe’. This time I’m saying I just don’t know.”

200 m Women     Semifinal 1 24 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 22.36 0,5 Q Allyson Felix United States USA 18 Nov 85  
2 22.56 0,5 Q Abi Oyepitan Great Britain GBR 30 Dec 79  
3 22.56 0,5 Q Ivet Lalova-Collio Bulgaria BUL 18 May 84  
4 22.69 0,5 Q Muna Lee United States USA 30 Oct 81  
5 22.75 0,5   Maryna Mindareva Ukraine UKR 22 Aug 82  
6 23.02 0,5   Beverly McDonald Jamaica JAM 15 Feb 70  
7 23.05 0,5   Christine Arron France FRA 13 Sep 73  
  DNF 0,5   Merlene Ottey Slovenia SLO 10 May 60  
200 m Women     Semifinal 2 24 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 22.13 1,1 Q Veronica Campbell-Brown Jamaica JAM 15 May 82  
2 22.33 1,1 Q Aleen Bailey Jamaica JAM 25 Nov 80  
3 22.48 1,1 Q Kim Gevaert Belgium BEL 5 Aug 78 NR
4 22.49 1,1 Q Debbie Ferguson McKenzie Bahamas BAH 16 Jan 76  
5 22.76 1,1   Cydonie Mothersill Cayman Islands CAY 19 Mar 78  
6 22.93 1,1   Lashauntea Moore United States USA 31 Jul 83  
7 22.99 1,1   Sylviane Félix France FRA 31 Oct 77  
8 23.30 1,1   Ólga Kaidantzí Greece GRE 18 Jul 79  
23 AUG 2004 General News

Women's 200m - Quarter Finals

Veronica Campbell’s name has been mentioned for some time as a potential 200m champion, ever since she won the sprint double at the 2000 World Junior championships in Chile. But only this season has she really threatened the very best on the senior world stage.

She has been running faster than ever this year, pushing her best time down to 22.18, and winning the sprint double at the Jamaican championships in June. Two nights ago she took a bronze medal in the 100m final and she looks like a good bet for a 200m medal too.

She topped the list of qualifiers from tonight’s second round, wininng the first heat ion 22.49 from double Commonwealth Games champion Debbie Ferguson of the Bahamas, who ran a season’s best of 22.53. Kim Gevaert of Belgium took the other automatic qualifying spot for tomorrow night’s semi-finals, in 22.69.

The second heat was slower, but USA’s Muna Lee still looked impressive, running a strong bend and pulling away in the first half of the straight to record 22.74. Aleen Baily of Jamaica, in 22.97, and Olga Kaidantzi of Greece sneaked into the semis with a third place 23.15.

Another of the new breed of young Americans won the third heat. Like Campbell, Allyson Felix has been touted as a potential world beater since May 2003 when the 18 year-old ran faster than the 23 year-old World Junior 200m record in Mexico City. She clocked 22.11 that day, but unfortunately no drug test was carried out so the record couldn’t be ratified.

That promise appears to be coming to fruition here in Athens as Felix was a dominant winner of the third heat, her 22.69 a full tenth ahead of her nearest challenger. That was Britain’s fast-improving Abi Oyepitan. The third spot went to Ukraine’s Maryna Maydanova, 22.86. France’s European record holder Christine Arron never looked likely to challenge but her 22.90 was good enough to claim a fastest losers’ spot.

All eyes focused on Slovenia’s Merlene Ottey at the start of the fourth and final heat. Was this to be her last ever Olympic race? How often have we said that before? How often have we been wrong? Cydonie Mothersill of the Cayman Islands won the race, in 22.76, with the much-fancied Ivet Lalova of Bulgaria second. Ottey was edged into fourth by Jamaica’s Beverley McDonald, 22.99 to 23.07, but she’s through. We haven’t seen the last of her yet.

200 m Women     Heat 1 23 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 22.49 0,3 Q Veronica Campbell-Brown Jamaica JAM 15 May 82  
2 22.53 0,3 Q Debbie Ferguson McKenzie Bahamas BAH 16 Jan 76  
3 22.68 0,3 Q Kim Gevaert Belgium BEL 5 Aug 78  
4 22.96 0,3 Q Lashauntea Moore United States USA 31 Jul 83  
5 23.08 0,3 Q Sylviane Félix France FRA 31 Oct 77  
6 23.09 0,3   Laverne Jones-Ferrette United States Virgin Islands ISV 16 Sep 81  
7 23.19 0,3   Karin Mayr-Krifka Austria AUT 4 Jun 71  
8 23.44 0,3   Lucimar de Moura Brazil BRA 22 Mar 74  
200 m Women     Heat 2 23 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 22.74 -0,3 Q Muna Lee United States USA 30 Oct 81  
2 22.97 -0,3 Q Aleen Bailey Jamaica JAM 25 Nov 80  
3 23.15 -0,3 Q Ólga Kaidantzí Greece GRE 18 Jul 79  
4 23.19 -0,3   Digna Luz Murillo Colombia COL 22 May 81  
5 23.23 -0,3   Tatyana Levina Russia RUS 28 Feb 77  
6 23.33 -0,3   Muriel Hurtis France FRA 25 Mar 79  
7 23.38 -0,3   Alenka Bikar Slovenia SLO 7 Jan 74  
8 23.63 -0,3   Natallia Safronnikava Belarus BLR 28 Feb 73  
200 m Women     Heat 3 23 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 22.69 0,2 Q Allyson Felix United States USA 18 Nov 85  
2 22.79 0,2 Q Abi Oyepitan Great Britain GBR 30 Dec 79  
3 22.86 0,2 Q Maryna Mindareva Ukraine UKR 22 Aug 82  
4 22.90 0,2 Q Christine Arron France FRA 13 Sep 73  
5 23.24 0,2   Fabienne Féraez Benin BEN 6 Aug 76  
6 23.26 0,2   Yelena Bolsun Russia RUS 25 Jun 82  
7 23.65 0,2   Marilia Gregoriou Cyprus CYP 13 Feb 80  
8 23.75 0,2   Mary Onyali Nigeria NGR 3 Feb 68  
200 m Women     Heat 4 23 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 22.76 0,1 Q Cydonie Mothersill Cayman Islands CAY 19 Mar 78  
2 22.81 0,1 Q Ivet Lalova-Collio Bulgaria BUL 18 May 84  
3 22.99 0,1 Q Beverly McDonald Jamaica JAM 15 Feb 70  
4 23.07 0,1 Q Merlene Ottey Slovenia SLO 10 May 60  
5 23.30 0,1   Joice Maduaka Great Britain GBR 30 Sep 73  
6 23.35 0,1   Anna Guzowska Poland POL 15 Jan 80  
7 23.37 0,1   Yekaterina Kondratyeva Russia RUS 8 Apr 82  
8 23.44 0,1   Lauren Hewitt Australia AUS 25 Nov 78  
23 AUG 2004 General News

Women's 200m - Heats

Just over 36 hours after winning a bronze medal in the women’s 100m, Jamaica’s Veronica Campbell led out the first race of the women’s 200m heats in the coolest conditions so far (26 degrees). Running in the outside lane, the Jamaican confirmed her pre-Games status as favourite for this event with a comfortable win. Her time, 22.59, was the only the sixth fastest of the round, 0.41 slower than the best time in the world this year, a mark she set at the Jamaican championships at the end of June.

But, unlike those who ran in later heats, Campbell had only a slight tailwind, +0.4, to help her. She also had to run virtually solo from lane seven, and still finished a full half second ahead of the second finisher, Slovenia’s Alenka Bikar.

Campbell’s wasn’t the only impressive performance, however. Inspired by carrying her nation’s flag at the Opening Ceremony, Cydonie Mothersill, blasted to a new Cayman Island’s record. The Central American champion clocked 22.40 (wind +1.6), five hundredths inside the record she set in 2003. Jamaica’s Beverley McDonald followed her home and also dipped under 23, recording 22.90.

The quickest race of the morning was heat four, in which five women ran under 23 seconds, led by US champion Allyson Felix. The 18 year-old confirmed her huge potential, and took advantage of a +2.00m/s wind, to produce an assured run in the fastest time of the round, 22.39. Running in lane 2, the inside lane for these races, Felix ran a powerful bend and held her form down the straight, dragging four athletes to personal and season’s bests.

Britain’s Abi Oyepitan was second in 22.50, breaking her personal best by 0.19, with Ukraine’s Maryna Maydanova, France’s golden girl Muriel Hurtis, and Austria’s World Indoor medallist Karin Mayr-Krifka all running their best times of the year. Mayr-Krifka’s time, 22.81, was easily quick enough to guarantee her a place in the next round as one of the four fastest losers.

Another of USA’s new generation also looked impressive. Muna Lee clocked 22.57 in heat five, benefiting from a +2.1 wind, while four 100m finallists, Bulgaria’s Ivet Lalova, Jamaica’s Aleen Bailey, Belgium’s Kim Geveart, and the Bahamas’ Debbie Ferguson, were among the 18 runners who dipped under 23 seconds. Lalova recorded 22.88 in heat two, Bailey dipped in front of Gevaert, 22.73 to 22.76, in heat six, and Ferguson sneaked in front of France’s Christine Arron in heat seven, 22.57 to 22.60, season’s best times for both.

With the wind reading +1.4, that final heat also saw a strong performance from 44 year-old Merlene Ottey. The veteran of seven Olympic Games finished third in 22.72, her best of the year by 0.17.

200 m Women     Heat 1 23 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 22.59 0,4 Q Veronica Campbell-Brown Jamaica JAM 15 May 82  
2 23.09 0,4 Q Alenka Bikar Slovenia SLO 7 Jan 74  
3 23.10 0,4 Q Lashauntea Moore United States USA 31 Jul 83  
4 23.40 0,4 Q Lucimar de Moura Brazil BRA 22 Mar 74  
5 23.66 0,4   Heide Seyerling South Africa RSA 19 Aug 76  
6 23.71 0,4   Monika Gachevska Bulgaria BUL 30 Jan 74  
200 m Women     Heat 2 23 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 22.88 1,7 Q Ivet Lalova-Collio Bulgaria BUL 18 May 84  
2 22.94 1,7 Q Sylviane Félix France FRA 31 Oct 77  
3 23.03 1,7 Q Yekaterina Kondratyeva Russia RUS 8 Apr 82  
4 23.28 1,7 Q Natallia Safronnikava Belarus BLR 28 Feb 73  
5 24.10 1,7   Lyubov Perepelova Uzbekistan UZB 26 Feb 79  
6 24.30 1,7   Greta Taslakian Lebanon LIB 16 Aug 85 NJR
200 m Women     Heat 3 23 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 22.40 1,6 Q Cydonie Mothersill Cayman Islands CAY 19 Mar 78 NR
2 22.90 1,6 Q Beverly McDonald Jamaica JAM 15 Feb 70  
3 23.00 1,6 Q Yelena Bolsun Russia RUS 25 Jun 82  
4 23.15 1,6 Q Joice Maduaka Great Britain GBR 30 Sep 73  
5 23.43 1,6   Saraswati Saha India IND 23 Nov 79  
6 25.62 1,6   Geinile Moyang Swaziland SWZ 12 May 80 NR
200 m Women     Heat 4 23 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 22.39 2 Q Allyson Felix United States USA 18 Nov 85  
2 22.50 2 Q Abi Oyepitan Great Britain GBR 30 Dec 79  
3 22.76 2 Q Maryna Mindareva Ukraine UKR 22 Aug 82  
4 22.77 2 Q Muriel Hurtis France FRA 25 Mar 79  
5 22.81 2 Q Karin Mayr-Krifka Austria AUT 4 Jun 71  
6 23.37 2 Q Mary Onyali Nigeria NGR 3 Feb 68  
7 27.51 2   Gladys Thompson Liberia LBR 8 Jun 83  
200 m Women     Heat 5 23 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 22.57w 2,1 Q Muna Lee United States USA 30 Oct 81  
2 23.05w 2,1 Q Tatyana Levina Russia RUS 28 Feb 77  
3 23.20w 2,1 Q Laverne Jones-Ferrette United States Virgin Islands ISV 16 Sep 81  
4 23.23w 2,1 Q Marilia Gregoriou Cyprus CYP 13 Feb 80  
5 23.43w 2,1   Emma Wade Belize BIZ 19 Dec 80  
6 24.37w 2,1   Michelle Banga Mondzoula Congo CGO 30 Nov 87  
200 m Women     Heat 6 23 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 22.73 -0,2 Q Aleen Bailey Jamaica JAM 25 Nov 80  
2 22.76 -0,2 Q Kim Gevaert Belgium BEL 5 Aug 78  
3 23.11 -0,2 Q Ólga Kaidantzí Greece GRE 18 Jul 79  
4 23.12 -0,2 Q Fabienne Féraez Benin BEN 6 Aug 76 NR
5 23.45 -0,2   Johanna Manninen Finland FIN 4 Apr 80  
6 23.56 -0,2   Kadiatou Camara Mali MLI 4 May 81  
200 m Women     Heat 7 23 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 22.57 1,4 Q Debbie Ferguson McKenzie Bahamas BAH 16 Jan 76  
2 22.60 1,4 Q Christine Arron France FRA 13 Sep 73  
3 22.72 1,4 Q Merlene Ottey Slovenia SLO 10 May 60 NR
4 22.87 1,4 Q Lauren Hewitt Australia AUS 25 Nov 78  
5 22.98 1,4 Q Digna Luz Murillo Colombia COL 22 May 81  
6 23.00 1,4 Q Anna Guzowska Poland POL 15 Jan 80  
 
Detailed View
 

Results

Round 1

Qualification rule: The first four finishers in each heat (Q) plus the next four fastest overall runners (q) qualified.

Heat 1

Wind: +0.4 m/s

Rank Lane Name Nationality Reaction Result Notes
1 7 Veronica Campbell Jamaica 0.252 22.59 Q
2 6 Alenka Bikar Slovenia 0.217 23.09 Q
3 3 La Shauntea Moore United States 0.253 23.10 Q
4 4 Lucimar de Moura Brazil 0.211 23.40 Q
5 2 Heide Seyerling South Africa 0.187 23.66  
6 5 Monika Gachevska Bulgaria 0.175 23.71  

Heat 2

Wind: +1.7 m/s

Rank Lane Name Nationality Reaction Result Notes
1 3 Ivet Lalova Bulgaria 0.168 22.88 Q
2 5 Sylviane Félix France 0.295 22.94 Q
3 6 Yekaterina Kondratyeva Russia 0.225 23.03 Q
4 2 Natallia Safronnikava Belarus 0.167 23.28 Q
5 4 Lyubov Perepelova Uzbekistan 0.306 24.10  
6 7 Gretta Taslakian Lebanon 0.260 24.30 NR

Heat 3

Wind: +1.6 m/s

Rank Lane Name Nationality Reaction Result Notes
1 5 Cydonie Mothersille Cayman Islands 0.266 22.40 Q, NR
2 6 Beverly McDonald Jamaica 0.191 22.90 Q
3 7 Yelena Bolsun Russia 0.262 23.00 Q
4 3 Joice Maduaka Great Britain 0.172 23.15 Q
5 4 Saraswati Saha India 0.275 23.43  
6 2 Gcinile Moyane Swaziland 0.230 25.62 NR

Heat 4

Wind: +2.0 m/s

Rank Lane Name Nationality Reaction Result Notes
1 2 Allyson Felix United States 0.212 22.39 Q
2 5 Abi Oyepitan Great Britain 0.180 22.50 Q, PB
3 7 Maryna Maydanova Ukraine 0.265 22.76 Q, SB
4 3 Muriel Hurtis France 0.217 22.77 Q, SB
5 4 Karin Mayr-Krifka Austria 0.189 22.81 q, SB
6 6 Mary Onyali-Omagbemi Nigeria 0.237 23.37 q
7 8 Gladys Thompson Liberia 0.281 27.51  

Heat 5

Wind: +2.1 m/s

Rank Lane Name Nationality Reaction Result Notes
1 4 Muna Lee United States 0.197 22.57 Q
2 2 Tatyana Levina Russia 0.187 23.05 Q
3 5 La Verne Jones Virgin Islands 0.239 23.20 Q
4 3 Marilia Gregoriou Cyprus 0.192 23.23 Q
5 6 Emma Wade Belize 0.206 23.43  
6 7 Michelle Banga Moudzoula Congo 0.247 24.37  

Heat 6

Wind: −0.2 m/s

Rank Lane Name Nationality Reaction Result Notes
1 2 Aleen Bailey Jamaica 0.218 22.73 Q
2 7 Kim Gevaert Belgium 0.187 22.76 Q
3 6 Olga Kaidantzi Greece 0.284 23.11 Q
4 3 Fabienne Feraez Benin 0.181 23.12 Q, =NR
5 4 Johanna Manninen Finland 0.166 23.45 SB
6 5 Kadiatou Camara Mali 0.287 23.56  

Heat 7

Wind: +1.4 m/s

Rank Lane Name Nationality Reaction Result Notes
1 2 Debbie Ferguson Bahamas 0.171 22.57 Q, SB
2 7 Christine Arron France 0.252 22.60 Q, SB
3 6 Merlene Ottey Slovenia 0.254 22.72 Q, NR
4 4 Lauren Hewitt Australia 0.165 22.87 Q, SB
5 3 Digna Murillo Colombia 0.149 22.98 q, PB
6 5 Anna Pacholak Poland 0.283 23.00 q, SB

Round 2

Qualification rule: The first three finishers in each heat (Q) plus the next four fastest overall runners (q) advanced to the semifinals.

Heat 1

Wind: +0.4 m/s

Rank Lane Name Nationality Reaction Result Notes
1 6 Veronica Campbell Jamaica 0.182 22.49 Q
2 4 Debbie Ferguson Bahamas 0.175 22.53 Q, SB
3 3 Kim Gevaert Belgium 0.169 22.68 Q
4 8 La Shauntea Moore United States 0.306 22.96 q
5 5 Sylviane Félix France 0.217 23.08 q
6 1 La Verne Jones Virgin Islands 0.188 23.09  
7 7 Karin Mayr-Krifka Austria 0.239 23.19  
8 2 Lucimar de Moura Brazil 0.165 23.44  

Heat 2

Wind: +0.4 m/s

Rank Lane Name Nationality Reaction Result Notes
1 4 Muna Lee United States 0.239 22.74 Q
2 3 Aleen Bailey Jamaica 0.227 22.97 Q
3 8 Olga Kaidantzi Greece 0.235 23.15 Q
4 1 Digna Murillo Colombia 0.189 23.19  
5 5 Tatyana Levina Russia 0.177 23.23  
6 7 Muriel Hurtis France 0.224 23.33  
7 6 Alenka Bikar Slovenia 0.163 23.38  
8 2 Natallia Safronnikava Belarus 0.184 23.63  

Heat 3

Wind: +0.2 m/s

Rank Lane Name Nationality Reaction Result Notes
1 4 Allyson Felix United States 0.196 22.69 Q
2 3 Abi Oyepitan Great Britain 0.168 22.79 Q
3 6 Maryna Maydanova Ukraine 0.225 22.86 Q
4 5 Christine Arron France 0.278 22.90 q
5 2 Fabienne Feraez Benin 0.213 23.24  
6 1 Yelena Bolsun Russia 0.158 23.26  
7 8 Marilia Gregoriou Cyprus 0.228 23.65  
8 7 Mary Onyali-Omagbemi Nigeria 0.245 23.75  

Heat 4

Wind: −0.1 m/s

Rank Lane Name Nationality Reaction Result Notes
1 4 Cydonie Mothersille Cayman Islands 0.212 22.76 Q
2 3 Ivet Lalova Bulgaria 0.128 22.81 Q
3 5 Beverly McDonald Jamaica 0.201 22.99 Q
4 6 Merlene Ottey Slovenia 0.292 23.07 q
5 8 Joice Maduaka Great Britain 0.219 23.30  
6 7 Anna Pacholak Poland 0.247 23.35  
7 1 Yekaterina Kondratyeva Russia 0.188 23.37  
8 2 Lauren Hewitt Australia 0.149 23.44  

Semifinals

Qualification rule: The first four finishers in each heat (Q) moved on to the final.

Semifinal 1

Wind: +0.5 m/s

Rank Lane Name Nationality Reaction Result Notes
1 3 Allyson Felix United States 0.198 22.36 Q
2 5 Abi Oyepitan Great Britain 0.125 22.56 Q
3 4 Ivet Lalova Bulgaria 0.160 22.56 Q, SB
4 6 Muna Lee United States 0.173 22.69 Q
5 8 Maryna Maydanova Ukraine 0.219 22.75  
6 1 Beverly McDonald Jamaica 0.172 23.02  
7 2 Christine Arron France 0.184 23.05  
  7 Merlene Ottey Slovenia 0.247 DNF  

Semifinal 2

Wind: +1.1 m/s

Rank Lane Name Nationality Reaction Result Notes
1 5 Veronica Campbell Jamaica 0.160 22.13 Q, PB
2 6 Aleen Bailey Jamaica 0.283 22.33 Q, PB
3 2 Kim Gevaert Belgium 0.154 22.48 Q, NR
4 4 Debbie Ferguson Bahamas 0.177 22.49 Q, SB
5 3 Cydonie Mothersille Cayman Islands 0.297 22.76  
6 8 La Shauntea Moore United States 0.346 22.93  
7 1 Sylviane Félix France 0.222 22.99  
8 7 Olga Kaidantzi Greece 0.225 23.30  

Final

Wind: +0.8 m/s

Rank Lane Name Nationality Reaction Result Notes
1st 4 Veronica Campbell Jamaica 0.216 22.05 PB
2nd 3 Allyson Felix United States 0.207 22.18 WJR
3rd 8 Debbie Ferguson Bahamas 0.193 22.30 SB
4 6 Aleen Bailey Jamaica 0.208 22.42  
5 2 Ivet Lalova Bulgaria 0.162 22.57  
6 1 Kim Gevaert Belgium 0.172 22.84  
7 7 Muna Lee United States 0.178 22.87  
7 5 Abi Oyepitan Great Britain 0.259 22.87  

 

 

 

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