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2008 Olympic Games Beijing - Men's 100 m

 

 

Host City: Beijing, China Format: Top four in each heat advanced to the final.
Date Started: August 15, 2008 Format: Top three in each heat and next fastest advanced to the semi-finals.
Date Finished: August 16, 2008 Format: Top three in each heat and next ten fastest advanced to the quarter-finals.
(Competitors: 80; Countries: 63; Finalists: 8)  
    Venue(s): Beijing National Stadium, Beijing
Overview by IAAF    2008_olympic_stadium.jpg
The prospective gold medalists were Bolt, Powell and Tyson Gay (USA), with Bolt, the new world record holder (9.72) the only uninjured athlete of the three in 2008. The quarter-finals saw the first heated action, with Martina setting a national record 9.99 in the first race. The other heat winners Thompson (9.99), Burns (10.05), a coasting Bolt (9.92), and Powell (10.05). Gay, who had injured himself after winning the US Trials (in 9.68w) ran a straining 10.09 behind Thompson. Bolt won the first semi-final in 9.85, still not showing full speed for the whole race, while Dix emerged as a possible medallist with his 9.95, which featured good mid-race acceleration. Kim Collins (SKN) missed the final despite running 10.05. Powell (9.91) held off Thompson (9.93) and Martina (9.94, another record) in the second race, while Patton (10.03) beat the under-raced Gay (10.05) for the final qualifying spot. For the first time in Olympic history a nation other than the USA had three finalists in the 100. Thompson, Frater and Bolt were the first to separate from the field, with a half-metre advantage by 40m. Bolt then showed acceleration of a type previously unseen for such a tall man, as he surged to a one-metre lead by the 60m mark, then doubled that advantage by 80m. At this point he lowered his arms and eased across the line celebrating, yet still set a new world record of 9.69 (actually 9.683). Behind this extraordinary display, Thompson just held off the fast-charging Dix for the silver medal, while Martina closed from last at halfway to fourth. Five of the first six all ran lifetime bests, with only Powell – fifth as he was in Athens – unable to do so.
       
Summary by Sports-reference.com      
Going into the 2008 season, the favorites for the title of World’s Fastest Man were Tyson Gay (USA) and Asafa Powell (JAM). Gay had won the 100 and 200 at the 2007 World Championships and Powell was a two-time world record setter. But in May 2008 Jamaica’s Usain Bolt broke Powell’s world record when he ran 9.72 at a meet in New York. Formerly considered primarily a 200 runner, he made the 100 a highly anticipated showdown between the big three sprinters. Gay won the American Olympic Trials in 9.68, but it was wind-aided and could not count for record purposes. Unfortunately, in the 200 at the Trials, he pulled up with a hamstring problem, would not be at his best in Beijing, and did not get past the semi-finals.
But that almost certainly had no effect on the outcome of the final. Usain Bolt was not known as the fastest starter but at 30 metres he was about equal to Richard Thompson (TRI), when he accelerated seemingly into another world. By 80 metres he had a huge lead and he then shut it down, turning around, dropping his arms in celebration, and costing himself some time. But he still broke the world record with 9.69, winning by 0.20 over Thompson. Estimates of his potential time, had he run thru the tape, ranged as low as 9.55 and this was with zero wind assistance. Powell was well-beaten, finishing fifth.

Records

Prior to this competition, the existing world and Olympic records were as follows:

World record  Usain Bolt (JAM) 9.72 s New York, United States 31 May 2008
Olympic record  Donovan Bailey (CAN) 9.84 s Atlanta, United States 27 July 1996

The following new world and Olympic records were set during this competition.

Date Event Athlete Time OR WR
16 August Final  Usain Bolt (JAM) 9.69 s OR WR
 
        Results        

The men's 100 metres sprint event at the 2008 Olympic Games took place on 15 and 16 August at the Beijing National Stadium. The final was won by Jamaican Usain Bolt in a world record time of 9.69 seconds.

Holding a considerable lead 70 metres into the race, Bolt opened his arms in celebration before slapping his chest. Kriss Akabusi criticized Usain Bolt's chest slapping before the finish line as showboating, shortly before Bolt captured the gold in the 100 meter sprint, noting that the actions cost Bolt an even faster record time. IOC president Jacques Rogge also condemned the Jamaican's actions as disrespectful. Bolt denied that this was the purpose of his mid-race celebration by saying "I wasn't bragging. When I saw I wasn't covered, I was just happy

Men's 100m - FINAL

Unbelievable!

Beijing was struck by a 'Bolt of lightning' as the World record tumbled with a simply staggering performance inside an awestruck Bird's Nest Stadium tonight.

Usain Bolt had promised us something very special after shattering the world record in New York earlier this year and we were not disappointed here in China as he stopped the clock in 9.69 in what is already regarded as one of the most exhilarating moments in Olympic track and field history.

He even had the temerity to slow down over the final 15 arms outstretched befor pumping his fist to his chest as he secured Jamaica's first ever Olympic 100m gold medal.
 
What made the performance even more amazing was his first competitve 100m race came only last year when he clocked 10.03 and the Olympic final was only his 13th race (and only eighth final) in his career over the distance.

Bolt himself was struggling to come to terms with what he achieved and said: "It was crazy, phenomenal. I wasn't even looking at the time I just came here to win. I am the Olympic champion. I'm just happy with that."

He also insisted his actions over the final 15m were not boastfulness.

"I wasn't bragging. When I saw I wasn't covered, I was just happy."

With World champion Tyson Gay not even making the final and Bolt recording 9.85 at a canter in the semi-finals, few would have backed against Bolt taking gold even with the presence of former world record holder and his countryman Asafa Powell also in the final.

The giant Jamaican looked relaxed at the start allowing himself a little smile and pulled back an imaginary bow to salute the crowd when his name was announced.

The final got away at the first time of asking amid a blizzard of flash lights from inside an electric Bird's Nest Stadium.

Trinidad's Richard Thompson in lane five, running alongside Bolt, made the best start with American Walter Dix, the US Trials runner-up, also prominent.

Bolt took a while to get his giant 6ft 5ins frame moving and Thompson still held a marginal lead at 50m but when the Jamaican's huge stride reached top speed he swept into the lead in what appeared a blink of an eye, and opening up an unassailable winning margin.

He then could allow himself the luxury of showboating across the final 15m to the astonishment of the crowd. The time - 9.69 - bettered his previous world record mark by 0.03.

Behind him mere mortals ran for the minor places on the podium.

Thompson, 23, the US Collegiate champion, backed up his superlative start to take silver in a new personal best of 9.89 and Dix snatched bronze with 9.91. Just 0.02 further adridft was Churandy Martina of Netherlands Antilles who set a national record of 9.93.

A stunned Powell was almost a forgotten figure. He was totally outclassed, recording 9.95 which was only good enough for fifth.

Michael Frater, the third string Jamaican, set a PB of 9.97 for sixth. Trindad's Marc Burns registered 10.01 for seventh with Darvis Patton eight and last in 10.03 - a time which would have been good enough for bronze at the 1992 Barcelona Games!

An elated Thompson described winning silver as 'a dream come true' and said of the gold medallist: "Usain Bolt is a great athlete to run a world record in the Olympic final. I tip my hat to him."

Dix, the bronze medallist, said: "I'm quite proud of the result. I'm glad to be on the podium for America."

A magnanimous Powell said of Bolt: "He's the best. There's no stopping him. I'm happy for Usain. He was definitely untouchable tonight. He's definitely the greatest."  

Bolt, still aged just 21, has long been a precocious talent. At the age of just 15 he became 2002 World Junior 200m champion in his native Jamaica and he also displayed great versatility as a 400m runner.

Injury ruined his hopes at the Athens Olympics four years ago and although he has since shown flashes of his jaw-dropping ability - last season he won a 200m silver medal behind Tyson Gay at the World Championships in Osaka - he has finally managed to realise that potential.

He has cut down on the partying, taken a more disciplined approach and reaped the rewards under the coaching of Glen Mills.

The exciting prospect for all fans of track and field is that we have not seen the last of Bolt in Beijing.

Up until this season he was seen more of a 200m specialist and his performances over the half lap this season have also been sensational. He has a 200m best of 19.67 what price he can now threaten Johnson's 200m iconic world record of 19.32 in Wednesday's final.

The whole world waits with huge expectation.  

Steve Landells for the IAAF

100 m Men     Final 16 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 9.69 0   Usain Bolt Jamaica JAM 21 Aug 86 WR
2 9.89 0   Richard Thompson Trinidad and Tobago TTO 7 Jun 85  
3 9.91 0   Walter Dix United States USA 31 Jan 86  
4 9.93 0   Churandy Martina Netherlands Antilles AHO 3 Jul 84 NR
5 9.95 0   Asafa Powell Jamaica JAM 23 Nov 82  
6 9.97 0   Michael Frater Jamaica JAM 6 Oct 82  
7 10.01 0   Marc Burns Trinidad and Tobago TTO 7 Jan 83  
8 10.03 0   Darvis Patton United States USA 4 Dec 77  

Men's 100m - Semi-finals

We thought it might happen and it actually did.

Tyson Gay, the World 100m champion, had looked far from full fitness during yesterday's heats and quarter-finals and he tamely crashed out the Olympic Games by finishing fifth in the second semi-final.

Gay has, of course, been sidelined since he pulled up injured in the 200m with a hamstring injury at the US Olympic Trials and went into the championships perilously short of fitness.

Running in the outside lane nine in the second semi-final he was never at the races.

Gay made a sluggish start and always struggled to impose his presence on the race, clocking 10.05, his Olympic dream over.

At the front it was former World record holder Asafa Powell who clinched the semi with an efficient victory in 9.91.

Just 0.02 behind the Jamaican was Trinidad's Richard Thompson, who equalled his personal best and continues to quietly impress in the competition.

Churandy Martina of the Netherlands' Antilles set a national record of 9.94 for third and he, too, will fancy his medal chances in the final.

Fourth and 0.02 ahead of a despondent Gay was Darvis Patton in 10.03 who will take his place in the final later tonight.

Francis Obikwelu, the 2004 Olympic 100m silver medallist, had to settle for sixth in 10.10 and the man from Portugal will play no further part in the 100m.

Has 9.85 ever looked easier? World record holder Usain Bolt gave yet more fuel to the belief that later tonight the Jamaican sensation will become Olympic champion by cantering to an emphatic victory in the first semi-final.

The eight-strong field chasing four automatic places for the final got away at the first time of asking and Trindad's Marc Burns was a slight leader at 30m.

However, from the halfway mark the mighty Bolt ambled into the lead his giant stride devoring the ground to stop the clock in 9.85 - within 0.13 of the World record mark he set in May.

Behind Bolt US trials runner-up Walter Dix kept his head, not easy when you have Bolt ahead of you, to cross the line second in 9.95, a possible hint at his medal potential.

Burns also produced a fluent piece of sprinting to book his final spot in 9.97 for third.

Michael Frater, the 2005 World 100m silver medallist, secured the fourth position for the final in 10.01 and guaranteed a full complement of three Jamaicans in the final.

There was disappointment, however, for former World champion Kim Collins (10.05) of St Kitts and Nevis who was run out of a place in the final for fifth. The 2007 World silver medallist Derrick Atkins of the Bahamas also missed out. He was sixth in 10.13.

Gay spoke of his disappointment at not making the final and said: "Toward the finish line I couldn't tell if I made it to the finals or not. I looked up there and realized I didn't. It was kind of devastating. I may have needed more races, but I don't really have any excuses. I just didn't make it. My hamstring feels good, it's not bothering me."

Steve Landells for the IAAF

100 m Men     Semifinal 1 16 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 9.85 -0.1 Q Usain Bolt Jamaica JAM 21 Aug 86  
2 9.95 -0.1 Q Walter Dix United States USA 31 Jan 86  
3 9.97 -0.1 Q Marc Burns Trinidad and Tobago TTO 7 Jan 83  
4 10.01 -0.1 Q Michael Frater Jamaica JAM 6 Oct 82  
5 10.05 -0.1   Kim Collins Saint Kitts and Nevis SKN 5 Apr 76  
6 10.13 -0.1   Derrick Atkins Bahamas BAH 5 Jan 84  
7 10.18 -0.1   Tyrone Edgar Great Britain GBR 29 Mar 82  
8 10.20 -0.1   Samuel Francis Qatar QAT 27 Mar 87  
100 m Men     Semifinal 2 16 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 9.91 0.3 Q Asafa Powell Jamaica JAM 23 Nov 82  
2 9.93 0.3 Q Richard Thompson Trinidad and Tobago TTO 7 Jun 85  
3 9.94 0.3 Q Churandy Martina Netherlands Antilles AHO 3 Jul 84 NR
4 10.03 0.3 Q Darvis Patton United States USA 4 Dec 77  
5 10.05 0.3   Tyson Gay United States USA 9 Aug 82  
6 10.10 0.3   Francis Obikwelu Portugal POR 22 Nov 78  
7 10.16 0.3   Naoki Tsukahara Japan JPN 10 May 85  
8 10.18 0.3   Martial Mbandjock France FRA 14 Oct 85  

Men's 100m quarter-finals

Has an expected three way battle for gold now become a two man fight?

While Jamaican duo Usain Bolt and Asafa Powell serenely progressed through to the tomorrow night's semi-finals the third pre-event big name contender, Tyson Gay, looked far from convincing.

Gay, who before his appearance in the first round this morning had not competed for six weeks since pulling up lame with a hamstring injury at the US Trials, was blown away by Trinidad's Richard Thompson in the second heat of round two.

The high-stepping Thompson sped to 9.99 but Gay always struggled to keep pace and finished second in 10.09. Gay did look better than his morning heat, which he won in 10.22, but few would now bet the 26-year-old American will add the Olympic title to his world crown tomorrow.

World record holder Usain Bolt firmly established himself as gold medal favourite by cantering to what appeared an effortless heat four victory in a Chinese All-comers record of 9.92.

Glancing to either side throughout the race he casually eased to yet another a sub-10 second clocking and scarily - at least for his oppositon - looked as if he had a tonne more left in the tank for tomorrow's semi-finals and, very probably, final.

Behind Bolt was US Trials third place finisher Darvis Patton (10.04) with 2004 Olympic silver medallist Francis Obikwelu third in 10.09.

Powell, meanwhile appeared to show no ill-effects from a reported stomach muscle injury, to sprint to a 10.02 heat four victory.

At no stage did Powell appear to hit top gear as he took victory easing down from US Trials runner-up Walter Dix (10.08).

Nonetheless, even Powell must be fearful of the hugely impressive form shown by his countryman, Bolt. 

The overall quality of the competition rose two notches from this morning's heats in front of a packed Bird's Nest Stadium and the joint second fastest qualifier behind Bolt was Churandy Martina of the Netherlands' Antilles, who produced a blistering performance in heat one to post a lifetime best of 9.99.

Martina, the man who finished fifth at last year's World Championships, has been in the top echelon of world sprinters this year and his performance reminded many of his medal credentials. The 2005 World Championships silver medallist Michael Frater of Jamaica finished second to advance to tomorrow night's semi-finals.

There was disappointment, however, for former World Junior champion Darrel Brown. The Trinidadian sprinter pulled up in the latter stages to trail home last in 10.93 and exit the competition.

Caribbean sprinting again impressed in heat three. Marc Burns of Trinidad edged a close race in 10.05 from former World champion Kim Collins of St Kitts and Nevis (10.07). Great Britain's Tyrone Edgar, the fastest qualifier from the first round, finished third in 10.10.

Steve Landells for the IAAF

100 m Men     Heat 1 15 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 9.99 -0.1 Q Churandy Martina Netherlands Antilles AHO 3 Jul 84 NR
2 10.09 -0.1 Q Michael Frater Jamaica JAM 6 Oct 82  
3 10.23 -0.1 Q Naoki Tsukahara Japan JPN 10 May 85  
4 10.32 -0.1   Simeon Williamson Great Britain GBR 16 Jan 86  
5 10.33 -0.1   Henry Vizcaíno Cuba CUB 16 May 80  
6 10.36 -0.1   Pierre Browne Canada CAN 14 Jan 80  
7 10.46 -0.1   Dariusz Kuć Poland POL 24 Apr 86  
8 10.93 -0.1   Darrel Brown Trinidad and Tobago TTO 11 Oct 84  
100 m Men     Heat 2 15 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 9.99 0 Q Richard Thompson Trinidad and Tobago TTO 7 Jun 85  
2 10.09 0 Q Tyson Gay United States USA 9 Aug 82  
3 10.16 0 Q Martial Mbandjock France FRA 14 Oct 85  
4 10.21 0   Olusoji Fasuba Nigeria NGR 9 Jul 84  
5 10.25 0   Andrew Hinds Barbados BAR 25 Apr 84  
6 10.32 0   José Carlos Moreira Brazil BRA 28 Sep 83  
7 10.33 0   Simone Collio Italy ITA 27 Dec 79  
8 10.37 0   Daniel Grueso Colombia COL 30 Jul 85  
100 m Men     Heat 3 15 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 10.05 -0.2 Q Marc Burns Trinidad and Tobago TTO 7 Jan 83  
2 10.07 -0.2 Q Kim Collins Saint Kitts and Nevis SKN 5 Apr 76  
3 10.10 -0.2 Q Tyrone Edgar Great Britain GBR 29 Mar 82  
4 10.11 -0.2   Samuel Francis Qatar QAT 27 Mar 87  
5 10.21 -0.2   Ronald Pognon France FRA 16 Nov 82  
6 10.24 -0.2   Matic Osovnikar Slovenia SLO 19 Jan 80  
7 10.36 -0.2   Tobias Unger Germany GER 10 Jul 79  
8 10.37 -0.2   Nobuharu Asahara Japan JPN 21 Jun 72  
100 m Men     Heat 4 15 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 9.92 0.1 Q Usain Bolt Jamaica JAM 21 Aug 86  
2 10.04 0.1 Q Darvis Patton United States USA 4 Dec 77  
3 10.09 0.1 Q Francis Obikwelu Portugal POR 22 Nov 78  
4 10.14 0.1   Jaysuma Saidy Ndure Norway NOR 1 Jan 84  
5 10.18 0.1   Craig Pickering Great Britain GBR 16 Oct 86  
6 10.27 0.1   Obinna Metu Nigeria NGR 12 Jul 88  
7 10.33 0.1   Anson Henry Canada CAN 9 Mar 79  
8 10.35 0.1   Ángel David Rodríguez Spain ESP 25 Apr 80  
100 m Men     Heat 5 15 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 10.02 -0.1 Q Asafa Powell Jamaica JAM 23 Nov 82  
2 10.08 -0.1 Q Walter Dix United States USA 31 Jan 86  
3 10.14 -0.1 Q Derrick Atkins Bahamas BAH 5 Jan 84  
4 10.23 -0.1   Daniel Bailey Antigua and Barbuda ANT 9 Sep 86  
5 10.24 -0.1   Aziz Zakari Ghana GHA 2 Sep 76  
6 10.25 -0.1   Andrey Yepishin Russia RUS 10 Jun 81  
7 10.31 -0.1   Vicente de Lima Brazil BRA 4 Jun 77  
8 10.40 -0.1   Hu Kai China CHN 4 Aug 82  

Men's 100m Round 1

After weeks of speculation, hot gossip and preevent posturing the battle to be crowned world's fastest man finally got underway inside a stifling Bird's Nest Stadium.

First up of the 'big three' - in one of the most eagerly anticipated 100m in Olympic history - was Jamaica's World record holder Usain Bolt who cruised through heat one in 10.20 with the minimum of fuss.

The languid Bolt barely got out of second gear during an eye-catching first 80m before easing down and striding out to victory from Antigua's Daniel Bailey (10.24).

Second up of the 'chief contenders' was former World record holder Asafa Powell. The Jamaican made a blistering  start and looked similarly easy, stopping the clock in 10.16 from former World 100m champion Kim Collins of St Kitts and Nevis (10.17).

Scrutiny on the physical shape of reigning World champion Tyson Gay, the last of the 'big three' to settle into his blocks, was intense after six weeks on the sidelines with a hamstring injury.

The US athlete, predictably, took victory in heat five, although after making sluggish start he appeared to work much harder than his two Jamaican rivals to record 10.22 - 0.09 ahead of world indoor 60m champion Olusoji Fasuba of Nigeria.

We will perhaps know more of the true state of his Gay's fitness after tonight's second round.

The fastest qualifier from the opening round was Great Britain's Tyrone Edgar, who looked impressive winning heat six in 10.13 - 0.12 ahead of Darvis Patton of the USA.

Trinidad's US Collegiate champion Richard Thompson (10.24) took victory in heat three and 2005 World Championship 100m silver medallist Michael Frater prevailed in 10.15 in heat four.

The 2004 Olympic silver medallist Francis Obikwelu crossed the line first in heat seven (10.24). Heat eight winner was 2007 World 100m silver medallist Derrick Atkins (10.28) while in the nine heat Qatar's Samuel Francis took top spot in 10.40.

The final heat winner was Churandy Martina of the Netherlands Antilles in 10.34.

Steve Landells for the IAAF

100 m Men     Heat 1 15 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 10.20 -0.2 Q Usain Bolt Jamaica JAM 21 Aug 86  
2 10.24 -0.2 Q Daniel Bailey Antigua and Barbuda ANT 9 Sep 86  
3 10.26 -0.2 Q Vicente de Lima Brazil BRA 4 Jun 77  
4 10.28 -0.2 Q Henry Vizcaíno Cuba CUB 16 May 80  
5 10.49 -0.2   Fabio Cerutti Italy ITA 26 Sep 85  
6 10.61 -0.2   Jurgen Themen Suriname SUR 26 Oct 85  
7 10.81 -0.2   Moses Kamut Vanuatu VAN 7 Jul 82  
8 11.09 -0.2   Francis Manioru Solomon Islands SOL 17 Sep 81  
100 m Men     Heat 2 15 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 10.16 0 Q Asafa Powell Jamaica JAM 23 Nov 82  
2 10.17 0 Q Kim Collins Saint Kitts and Nevis SKN 5 Apr 76  
3 10.21 0 Q Craig Pickering Great Britain GBR 16 Oct 86  
4 10.35 0 Q Daniel Grueso Colombia COL 30 Jul 85  
5 10.44 0   Dariusz Kuć Poland POL 24 Apr 86  
6 10.51 0   Béranger Bossé Central African Republic CAF 9 Mar 85  
7 11.17 0   Aisea Tohi Tonga TGA 15 Apr 87  
8 11.18 0   Roman Cress Marshall Islands MHL 2 Aug 77  
100 m Men     Heat 3 15 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 10.24 0 Q Richard Thompson Trinidad and Tobago TTO 7 Jun 85  
2 10.26 0 Q Martial Mbandjock France FRA 14 Oct 85  
3 10.32 0 Q Simone Collio Italy ITA 27 Dec 79  
4 10.34 0 Q Aziz Zakari Ghana GHA 2 Sep 76  
5 10.35 0 Q Andrew Hinds Barbados BAR 25 Apr 84  
6 10.46 0   Suryo Agung Wibowo Indonesia INA 8 Oct 83  
7 11.00 0   Jared Lewis Saint Vincent and the Grenadines VIN 8 Mar 82  
8 11.29 0   Rabangaki Nawai Kiribati KIR 6 Sep 85  
100 m Men     Heat 4 15 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 10.15 0.2 Q Michael Frater Jamaica JAM 6 Oct 82  
2 10.22 0.2 Q Pierre Browne Canada CAN 14 Jan 80  
3 10.22 0.2 Q Darrel Brown Trinidad and Tobago TTO 11 Oct 84  
4 10.25 0.2 Q Nobuharu Asahara Japan JPN 21 Jun 72  
5 10.58 0.2   Holder da Silva Guinea-Bissau GBS 22 Jan 88  
6 10.63 0.2   Idrissa Sanou Burkina Faso BUR 12 Jun 77  
7 11.01 0.2   Ghyd-Kermeliss Olonghot Congo CGO 15 Mar 86  
8 11.45 0.2   Massoud Azizi Afghanistan AFG 2 Feb 85  
100 m Men     Heat 5 15 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 10.22 0.7 Q Tyson Gay United States USA 9 Aug 82  
2 10.29 0.7 Q Olusoji Fasuba Nigeria NGR 9 Jul 84  
3 10.29 0.7 Q José Carlos Moreira Brazil BRA 28 Sep 83  
4 10.34 0.7 Q Ángel David Rodríguez Spain ESP 25 Apr 80  
5 10.52 0.7   Lukáš Milo Czech Republic CZE 19 Oct 83  
6 10.62 0.7   Youssouf Mhadjoub Comoros COM 5 Jun 90 NJR
7 11.00 0.7   Danny D'Souza Seychelles SEY 14 Nov 87  
8 12.60 0.7   Shanahan Sanitoa American Samoa ASA 26 Jun 89  
100 m Men     Heat 6 15 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 10.13 0.9 Q Tyrone Edgar Great Britain GBR 29 Mar 82  
2 10.25 0.9 Q Darvis Patton United States USA 4 Dec 77  
3 10.26 0.9 Q Ronald Pognon France FRA 16 Nov 82  
4 10.39 0.9 Q Hu Kai China CHN 4 Aug 82  
5 10.53 0.9   Abdullah Al-Sooli Oman OMA 20 Jan 88  
6 10.66 0.9   Desislav Gunev Bulgaria BUL 21 Jan 86  
7 11.11 0.9   Ali Shareef Maldives MDV 1 Jul 79 NR
8 11.51 0.9   Souksavanh Tonsacktheva Laos LAO 12 Aug 88  
100 m Men     Heat 7 15 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 10.25 -1.4 Q Francis Obikwelu Portugal POR 22 Nov 78  
2 10.34 -1.4 Q Obinna Metu Nigeria NGR 12 Jul 88  
3 10.35 -1.4 Q Walter Dix United States USA 31 Jan 86  
4 10.37 -1.4 Q Anson Henry Canada CAN 9 Mar 79  
5 10.57 -1.4   Dmitriy Barskiy Ukraine UKR 17 Feb 81  
6 10.73 -1.4   Calvin Kang Li Loong Singapore SIN 16 Apr 90  
7 11.38 -1.4   Jesse Tamangrow Palau PLW 16 Mar 82  
8 11.61 -1.4   Reginaldo Micha Ndong Equatorial Guinea GEQ 14 Oct 86  
100 m Men     Heat 8 15 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 10.28 -0.1 Q Derrick Atkins Bahamas BAH 5 Jan 84  
2 10.34 -0.1 Q Andrey Yepishin Russia RUS 10 Jun 81  
3 10.37 -0.1 Q Jaysuma Saidy Ndure Norway NOR 1 Jan 84  
4 10.46 -0.1   Uchenna Emedolu Nigeria NGR 17 Sep 76  
5 10.52 -0.1   Su Wai'bou Sanneh Gambia GAM 30 Oct 90  
6 10.60 -0.1   Sandro Viana Brazil BRA 26 Mar 77  
7 10.63 -0.1   Lai Chun Ho Hong Kong HKG 5 Feb 89  
8 11.07 -0.1   Mohamed Abu Abdallah Bahamas BAN 3 Jan 81  
100 m Men     Heat 9 15 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 10.40 -1.7 Q Samuel Francis Qatar QAT 27 Mar 87  
2 10.46 -1.7 Q Marc Burns Trinidad and Tobago TTO 7 Jan 83  
3 10.46 -1.7 Q Matic Osovnikar Slovenia SLO 19 Jan 80  
4 10.49 -1.7   Rolando Palacios Honduras HON 3 May 87  
5 10.58 -1.7   Ruslan Abbasov Azerbaijan AZE 24 Jun 86  
6 10.70 -1.7   Sébastien Gattuso Monaco MON 28 Jun 71  
7 11.03 -1.7   Jack Howard Federated States of Micronesia FSM 21 Jul 81  
8 11.41 -1.7   Gordon Teokotai Heather Cook Islands COK 14 May 90  
100 m Men     Heat 10 15 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 10.35 -1.3 Q Churandy Martina Netherlands Antilles AHO 3 Jul 84  
2 10.39 -1.3 Q Naoki Tsukahara Japan JPN 10 May 85  
3 10.42 -1.3 Q Simeon Williamson Great Britain GBR 16 Jan 86  
4 10.46 -1.3   Tobias Unger Germany GER 10 Jul 79  
5 10.60 -1.3   Franklin Nazareno Ecuador ECU 24 Apr 87  
6 10.87 -1.3   Wilfried Bingangoye Gabon GAB 25 Mar 85  
7 11.14 -1.3   Moumi Sèbergue Chad CHA 7 Dec 77  
8 11.48 -1.3   Okilani Tinilau Tuvalu TUV 2 Jan 89 NR NJR
 
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Heats

The first round was held on 15 August. The first three runners of each heat plus the next ten overall fastest runners qualified for the second round.

Heat 1

Rank Lane Name Nationality Reaction Time Result Notes Qual.
1 3 Usain Bolt Jamaica 0.186 10.20   Q
2 9 Daniel Bailey Antigua and Barbuda 0.198 10.24   Q
3 6 Vicente de Lima Brazil 0.168 10.26 =SB Q
4 2 Henry Vizcaíno Cuba 0.157 10.28   q
5 4 Fabio Cerutti Italy 0.136 10.49    
6 5 Jurgen Themen Suriname 0.179 10.61 PB  
7 8 Moses Kamut Vanuatu 0.181 10.81    
8 7 Francis Manioru Solomon Islands 0.197 11.09    
  Wind: -0.2 m/s

Heat 2

Rank Lane Name Nationality Reaction Time Result Notes Qual.
1 5 Asafa Powell Jamaica 0.142 10.16   Q
2 3 Kim Collins Saint Kitts and Nevis 0.162 10.17   Q
3 7 Craig Pickering Great Britain 0.174 10.21   Q
4 2 Daniel Grueso Colombia 0.178 10.35   q
5 9 Dariusz Kuć Poland 0.144 10.44   q
6 8 Béranger Bosse Central African Republic 0.144 10.51 SB  
7 6 Aisea Tohi Tonga 0.159 11.17    
8 4 Roman William Cress Marshall Islands 0.190 11.18    
  Wind: 0.0 m/s

Heat 3

Rank Lane Name Nationality Reaction Time Result Notes Qual.
1 8 Richard Thompson Trinidad and Tobago 0.188 10.24   Q
2 5 Martial Mbandjock France 0.162 10.26   Q
3 4 Simone Collio Italy 0.140 10.32   Q
4 2 Aziz Zakari Ghana 0.177 10.34   q
5 6 Andrew Hinds Barbados 0.140 10.35   q
6 3 Suryo Agung Wibowo Indonesia 0.175 10.46    
7 7 Jared Lewis Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 0.123 11.00    
8 9 Rabangaki Nawai Kiribati 0.152 11.29 SB  
  Wind: 0.0 m/s

Heat 4

Rank Lane Name Nationality Reaction Time Result Notes Qual.
1 3 Michael Frater Jamaica 0.156 10.15   Q
2 4 Pierre Browne Canada 0.141 10.22   Q
3 6 Darrel Brown Trinidad and Tobago 0.139 10.22   Q
4 7 Nobuharu Asahara Japan 0.160 10.25   q
5 9 Holder da Silva Guinea-Bissau 0.184 10.58    
6 2 Idrissa Sanou Burkina Faso 0.171 10.63    
7 8 Ghyd-Kermeliss-Holly Olonghot Congo 0.172 11.01    
8 5 Massoud Azizi Afghanistan 0.160 11.45    
  Wind: 0.2 m/s

Heat 5

Rank Lane Name Nationality Reaction Time Result Notes Qual.
1 2 Tyson Gay United States 0.148 10.22   Q
2 5 Olusoji A. Fasuba Nigeria 0.156 10.29   Q
3 4 José Carlos Moreira Brazil 0.192 10.29   Q
4 7 Ángel David Rodríguez Spain 0.145 10.34   q
5 9 Lukas Milo Czech Republic 0.145 10.52    
6 8 Mhadjou Youssouf Comoros 0.170 10.62 PB  
7 3 Danny D'Souza Seychelles 0.180 11.00    
8 6 Shanahan Sanitoa American Samoa 0.158 12.60    
  Wind: 0.7 m/s

Heat 6

Rank Lane Name Nationality Reaction Time Result Notes Qual.
1 5 Tyrone Edgar Great Britain 0.138 10.13   Q
2 6 Darvis Patton United States 0.149 10.25   Q
3 7 Ronald Pognon France 0.167 10.26   Q
4 2 Hu Kai China 0.152 10.39   q
5 4 Abdullah Al-Sooli Oman 0.153 10.53 PB  
6 8 Desislav Gunev Bulgaria 0.152 10.66    
7 3 Ali Shareef Maldives 0.171 11.11 NR  
8 9 Souksavanh Tonsacktheva Laos 0.183 11.51    
  Wind: 0.9 m/s

Heat 7

Rank Lane Name Nationality Reaction Time Result Notes Qual.
1 4 Francis Obikwelu Portugal 0.190 10.25   Q
2 2 Obinna Metu Nigeria 0.176 10.34   Q
3 5 Walter Dix United States 0.167 10.35   Q
4 6 Anson Henry Canada 0.138 10.37   q
5 8 Dmytro Hlushchenko Ukraine 0.200 10.57    
6 3 Calvin Kang Li Loong Singapore 0.140 10.73    
7 9 Jesse Tamangrow Palau 0.146 11.38 PB  
8 7 Reginaldo Micha Ndong Equatorial Guinea 0.242 11.61    
  Wind: -1.4 m/s

Heat 8

Rank Lane Name Nationality Reaction Time Result Notes Qual.
1 3 Derrick Atkins Bahamas 0.162 10.28   Q
2 4 Andrey Yepishin Russia 0.172 10.34   Q
3 9 Jaysuma Saidy Ndure Norway 0.164 10.37   Q
4 6 Uchenna Emedolu Nigeria 0.192 10.46    
5 2 Suwaibou Sanneh The Gambia 0.157 10.52    
6 5 Sandro Viana Brazil 0.160 10.60    
7 7 Lai Chun Ho Hong Kong 0.199 10.63    
8 8 Mohamed Abu Abdullah Bangladesh 0.174 11.07    
  Wind: -0.1 m/s

Heat 9

Rank Lane Name Nationality Reaction Time Result Notes Qual.
1 6 Samuel Francis Qatar 0.153 10.40   Q
2 5 Marc Burns Trinidad and Tobago 0.160 10.46   Q
3 9 Matic Osovnikar Slovenia 0.187 10.46   Q
4 7 Rolando Palacios Honduras 0.189 10.49    
5 2 Ruslan Abbasov Azerbaijan 0.154 10.58    
6 4 Sébastien Gattuso Monaco 0.164 10.70    
7 8 Jack Howard Federated States of Micronesia 0.204 11.03    
8 3 Gordon Heather Cook Islands 0.214 11.41 PB  
  Wind: -1.7 m/s

Heat 10

Rank Lane Name Nationality Reaction Time Result Notes Qual.
1 4 Churandy Martina Netherlands Antilles 0.164 10.35   Q
2 5 Naoki Tsukahara Japan 0.169 10.39   Q
3 6 Simeon Williamson Great Britain 0.183 10.42   Q
4 9 Tobias Unger Germany 0.161 10.46   q
5 8 Franklin Nazareno Ecuador 0.178 10.60    
6 7 Wilfried Bingangoye Gabon 0.171 10.87    
7 2 Moumi Sebergue Chad 0.210 11.14    
8 3 Okilani Tinilau Tuvalu 0.174 11.48 NR  
  Wind: -1.3 m/s
Q - Qualified as one of first 3 in heat
q - Qualified as one of the next 10 fastest

Quarterfinals

The quarterfinals was held on 15 August. The first three runners of each heat plus the next overall fastest runner qualified for the semifinals.

Quarterfinal 1

Rank Lane Name Nationality Reaction Time Result Notes Qual.
1 4 Churandy Martina Netherlands Antilles 0.142 9.99 NR Q
2 7 Michael Frater Jamaica 0.154 10.09   Q
3 6 Naoki Tsukahara Japan 0.156 10.23 SB Q
4 9 Simeon Williamson Great Britain 0.127 10.32    
5 3 Henry Vizcaíno Cuba 0.167 10.33    
6 5 Pierre Browne Canada 0.144 10.36    
7 2 Dariusz Kuć Poland 0.176 10.46    
8 8 Darrel Brown Trinidad and Tobago 0.119 10.93    
  Wind: -0.1 m/s

Quarterfinal 2

Rank Lane Name Nationality Reaction Time Result Notes Qual.
1 6 Richard Thompson Trinidad and Tobago 0.170 9.99   Q
2 4 Tyson Gay United States 0.146 10.09   Q
3 7 Martial Mbandjock France 0.160 10.16   Q
4 5 Olusoji A. Fasuba Nigeria 0.147 10.21    
5 2 Andrew Hinds Barbados 0.148 10.25    
6 8 José Carlos Moreira Brazil 0.193 10.32    
7 9 Simone Collio Italy 0.138 10.33    
8 3 Daniel Grueso Colombia 0.193 10.37    
  Wind: 0.0 m/s

Quarterfinal 3

Rank Lane Name Nationality Reaction Time Result Notes Qual.
1 6 Marc Burns Trinidad and Tobago 0.174 10.05   Q
2 4 Kim Collins Saint Kitts and Nevis 0.150 10.07 =SB Q
3 5 Tyrone Edgar Great Britain 0.130 10.10   Q
4 7 Samuel Francis Qatar 0.164 10.11   q
5 9 Ronald Pognon France 0.167 10.21    
6 8 Matic Osovnikar Slovenia 0.171 10.24    
7 2 Tobias Unger Germany 0.136 10.36    
8 3 Nobuharu Asahara Japan 0.145 10.37    
  Wind: -0.2 m/s

Quarterfinal 4

Rank Lane Name Nationality Reaction Time Result Notes Qual.
1 7 Usain Bolt Jamaica 0.165 9.92   Q
2 5 Darvis Patton United States 0.159 10.04   Q
3 4 Francis Obikwelu Portugal 0.168 10.09   Q
4 8 Jaysuma Saidy Ndure Norway 0.133 10.14    
5 9 Craig Pickering Great Britain 0.144 10.18    
6 6 Obinna Metu Nigeria 0.174 10.27    
7 3 Anson Henry Canada 0.142 10.33    
8 2 Ángel David Rodríguez Spain 0.154 10.35    
  Wind: 0.1 m/s

Quarterfinal 5

Rank Lane Name Nationality Reaction Time Result Notes Qual.
1 7 Asafa Powell Jamaica 0.149 10.02   Q
2 9 Walter Dix United States 0.163 10.08   Q
3 5 Derrick Atkins Bahamas 0.179 10.14   Q
4 4 Daniel Bailey Antigua and Barbuda 0.149 10.23    
5 3 Aziz Zakari Ghana 0.167 10.24    
6 6 Andrey Yepishin Russia 0.158 10.25    
7 8 Vicente de Lima Brazil 0.157 10.31    
8 2 Hu Kai China 0.165 10.40    
  Wind: -0.1 m/s

Semifinals

The semifinals were held on 16 August. The first four runners from each semifinal qualified for the final.

Semifinal 1

Rank Lane Name Nationality Reaction Time Result Notes Qual.
1 7 Usain Bolt Jamaica 0.161 9.85   Q
2 6 Walter Dix United States 0.143 9.95 SB Q
3 4 Marc Burns Trinidad and Tobago 0.124 9.97 =SB Q
4 9 Michael Frater Jamaica 0.163 10.01   Q
5 5 Kim Collins Saint Kitts and Nevis 0.163 10.05 SB  
6 2 Derrick Atkins Bahamas 0.159 10.13    
7 8 Tyrone Edgar Great Britain 0.143 10.18    
8 3 Samuel Francis Qatar 0.146 10.20    
  Wind: -0.1 m/s

Semifinal 2

Rank Lane Name Nationality Reaction Time Result Notes Qual.
1 6 Asafa Powell Jamaica 0.161 9.91   Q
2 7 Richard Thompson Trinidad and Tobago 0.175 9.93 =PB Q
3 5 Churandy Martina Netherlands Antilles 0.138 9.94 NR Q
4 4 Darvis Patton United States 0.149 10.03   Q
5 9 Tyson Gay United States 0.145 10.05    
6 8 Francis Obikwelu Portugal 0.157 10.10    
7 3 Naoki Tsukahara Japan 0.143 10.16 SB  
8 2 Martial Mbandjock France 0.148 10.18    
  Wind: 0.3 m/s

Final

 
Bolt held a considerable lead over his rivals in the closing stages of the 100 m final.

The final was held on 16 August.

Rank Lane Name Nationality Reaction Time Result Notes
1st 4 Usain Bolt Jamaica 0.165 9.69 WR
2nd 5 Richard Thompson Trinidad and Tobago 0.133 9.89 PB
3rd 6 Walter Dix United States 0.133 9.91 PB
4 9 Churandy Martina Netherlands Antilles 0.169 9.93 NR
5 7 Asafa Powell Jamaica 0.134 9.95  
6 2 Michael Frater Jamaica 0.147 9.97 PB
7 8 Marc Burns Trinidad and Tobago 0.145 10.01  
8 3 Darvis Patton United States 0.142 10.03  
  Wind: 0.0 m/s
 
 

 

 

 

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