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2008 Olympic Games Beijing - Men's 400 m

 

 

Host City: Beijing, China Format: Top two in each heat and next two fastest advanced to the final.
Date Started: August 18, 2008 Format: Top three in each heat and next three fastest advanced to the semi-finals.
Date Finished: August 21, 2008  
(Competitors: 55; Countries: 41; Finalists: 8)  
    Venue(s): Beijing National Stadium, Beijing
Overview by IAAF   2008_olympic_stadium.jpg 
Brown was the fastest in the heats, leading four men to sub 45 clockings with his 44.79. The Bahamanian improved to 44.59 in the semis, but was outclassed by reigning champion Wariner, who coasted to a 44.15 win. The co-favourite, Merritt, ran 44.12 in the second semifinal, easily holding off Britain’s tall (1.98) Rooney. Debate was torn between Wariner and Merritt, 2-2 in head-to-head competition during the season, as to which athlete might win. Until the 300m point, the race was close, with Wariner holding a slight advantage over Merritt and Neville, but Meritt held form while Wariner surprisingly wilted. Merritt won by eight metres, with Wariner trotting in ahead of Neville, who dived for the line to edge out Brown for the bronze.
       
Summary by Sports-reference.com      
Since 2004 the world's best one-lap runner was Jeremy Wariner. He was the defending gold medalist and had won the World Championships in 2005 and 2007. But his 2008 season had shown some chinks in his armor. Early in the year he split from his long-time coach, Clyde Hart, and track experts thought this might hurt him. Whether it had an effect or not could not be known for sure, but LaShawn Merritt, who Wariner had defeated 11 straight times over the past 3 years, moved up to challenge his title as the best 400 runner. Early in the year, Merritt finally defeated Wariner in Berlin, and he repeated that at the US Olympic Trials. They were the two heavy favorites. In the final, they were close coming to the final straight, but Merritt had far more left, pulling away to win easily by almost a full second, the largest margin of victory at the Olympics in this event since 1896. Wariner did shut down some in the straight but held on for the silver medal. The bronze medal looked like it would go to Bahamian Chris Brown. But America's David Neville closed quickly down the stretch and dove at the line, edging Brown and completing an American sweep of the medals.
 

Records

Prior to this competition, the existing world and Olympic records were as follows:

World record United States Michael Johnson (United States) 43.18 s Seville, Spain 26 August 1999
Olympic record  Michael Johnson (USA) 43.49 s Atlanta, United States 29 July 1996

No new world or Olympic records were set for this event.

Qualification

Each National Olympic Committee (NOC) was able to enter up to three entrants providing they had met the A qualifying standard (45.55) in the qualifying period (1 January 2007 to 23 July 2008). NOCs were also permitted to enter one athlete providing he had met the B standard (45.95) in the same qualifying period
 
        Results        

The men's 400 metres at the 2008 Summer Olympics took place on 18–21 August at the Beijing National Stadium.

The defending champion was Jeremy Wariner, who also won World Championship titles in 2005 and 2007. At the US Olympic Trials he was runner up to LaShawn Merritt, the World Championship silver medalist. Merritt won with a personal best 43.75, Wariner came second and David Neville third. The race was an American sweep of the event

Men's 400m - FINAL

 

head clash of these Games and in the end it wasn’t even close.

Powering to a one-step lead off the final bend, LaShawn Merritt forged onwards to overwhelming victory to dethrone defending 400m champion Jeremy Wariner clocking 43.75.

In fact, Merritt’s margin of victory, at 0.99 just under a full second, was the greatest in Olympic history.

“You don’t become a champion without being mentally and physically tough,” said Merritt, who at 22 is two year’s Wariner’s junior. “And you know what, I showed up and got it done.”

After watching Merritt romp down the homestretch, there was simply no debating that assessment.

“I actually focused on running on that back stretch,” said Merritt, who improved significantly on his 43.96 career best set it Osaka last year when he finished second to Wariner. “I ran it like I wanted the gold medal. Like my roommate, Angelo Taylor. He ran it like he wanted to win.”

Wariner, lined up in Lane 7, got out the fastest, building a marginal lead midway through the back straight. But in the meantime, Merritt, running in Lane 4, opened with a slightly more controlled tempo, running relaxed down the back straight and began to draw even midway through the final turn to enter the straight with a half step lead.

That was usually the point where Wariner begins to pull away. But this time, as was the case in his two other defeats to Merritt this year – in both occasions lined up to Merritt’s outside, incidentally - he didn’t. 

Instead, it was Merritt who turned that narrow edge at the top of the straight into an insurmountable lead which he extended with each long powerful stride. Behind him Wariner was a shadow of his former self. Unable to respond, he began to fade gradually, but held on for second in 44.74.

Closing markedly faster as well was David Neville, whose finishing lean evolved into a dive. He nearly caught Wariner, but fell – literally – just a bit short in 44.80, to clinch the second consecutive U.S. Olympic sweep of the event.

“I felt good off the first 200, when I tried to move it just wasn’t there,” said Wariner, whose only slower performance in a final this year was his 44.82 in Melbourne in February. “If I could have had the race I had in the semi-finals, it would have been a closer race.”

“I had to go in head first,” Neville said. “It was a tough race at the end, but sometimes you have to dive in and give it your all.”

Bahamian record holder Chris Brown was a close fourth in 44.84, with Frenchman Leslie Djhone edging Briton Martyn Rooney by a scant 0.01 in 45.11.

Since his victory in Athens four years ago, Wariner was the event’s dominant force until Merritt’s rise this year as his first significant challenge. Merritt has spent those same four years waiting for his moment to arrive.

“Four years ago I got gold at the World Juniors in Grosseto, and I said that four years later I wanted to do it on the Olympic level. And I got here and got it done.”

Bob Ramsak for the IAAF

400 m Men     Final 21 August      
                 
Rank Mark     Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 43.75     LaShawn Merritt United States USA 27 Jun 86  
2 44.74     Jeremy Wariner United States USA 31 Jan 84  
3 44.80     David Neville United States USA 1 Jun 84  
4 44.84     Chris Brown Bahamas BAH 15 Oct 78  
5 45.11     Leslie Djhone France FRA 18 Mar 81  
6 45.12     Martyn Rooney Great Britain GBR 3 Apr 87  
7 45.22     Rennie Quow Trinidad and Tobago TTO 25 Aug 87  
8 45.39     Johan Wissman Sweden SWE 2 Dec 82  

Men's 400m - Semi-finals

 

Even before events took a dramatic turn in the men’s 100 metres, the Jeremy Wariner – LaShawn Merritt clash over the full lap was billed as the showdown of the Games. And both look extremely well prepared after their convincing and dominating victories in the semi-finals tonight.

In the first of three semis, defending Olympic and two-time World champion Wariner wasted little time to stamp his authority. On fire out of the blocks, the 24-year-old Texan made up the stagger on the field by midway, and once through the turn, gradually shut it down, looking to his outside some 40 metres from the finish before cruising through the line in 44.15. This season, only he and Merritt have run faster.

And Merritt was even faster tonight. Out quickly but more patiently than Wariner, the 22-year-old U.S. champion gradually built a comfortable lead with what appeared to be a very evenly run race. He was unchallenged over the final 100 metres, stopping the clock in 44.12.

“I’m excited for the finals,” said Wariner, who leads the world this year at 43.86. “I knew where I was at. I did everything I wanted to.”

Said Merritt, who’s run 44.00 this year: “Anything can happen on any day. I’m in the best shape of my life. I’m ready to show the world what I can do.”

In 2008, the two have split their four meetings. The lane draw may be critical; both of Wariner’s victories came when Merritt ran to his outside. In Thursday’s final, Merritt will line up in lane four, and Wariner in seven.

Behind him, Briton Martyn Rooney improved yet again, making up two spots over the final 50 metres to finish second in a personal best 44.60, just ahead of Swedish record holder Johan Wissman, who advanced easily on time. Renny Quow of Trinidad, moved on as well after his 44.82, also a career best.

“The last 100 metres were hard,” said Rooney, who as each race passes, looks more and more a medal contender. “I had to run a personal best to get through.”

Meanwhile, Bahamian Chris Brown, this season’s third fastest, was the only other runner remotely close to Wariner and advanced easily with his runner-up finish in 44.59. Although they failed to advance from Heat 1, Belgian Kevin Borlee (44.88) in third, Costa Rica’s Nery Brenes (44.94) in fourth and Tabarie Henry (45.19) from the U.S. Virgin Islands in seventh each produced national records.

Godday James of Nigeria took the early lead in heat 2, followed by Frenchman Leslie Djhone and Australian champion Joel Milburn. But as James began to fade heading off the final bend, it was U.S. indoor champion David Neville who began his surge towards the finish. As Milburn slowed, Neville gained but neither would catch Djhone who won with a season’s best 44.79. Neville stopped the clock in 44.91 to take move on as well.

Bob Ramsak for the IAAF

400 m Men     Semifinal 1 19 August      
                 
Rank Mark     Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 44.15   Q Jeremy Wariner United States USA 31 Jan 84  
2 44.59   Q Chris Brown Bahamas BAH 15 Oct 78  
3 44.88     Kevin Borlée Belgium BEL 22 Feb 88 NR
4 44.94     Nery Brenes Costa Rica CRC 25 Sep 85 NR
5 45.02     Saul Welgopwa Nigeria NGR 14 Jun 84  
6 45.06     William Collazo Cuba CUB 31 Aug 86  
7 45.19     Tabarie Henry United States Virgin Islands ISV 1 Dec 87 NR
8 45.64     Claudio Licciardello Italy ITA 11 Jan 86  
400 m Men     Semifinal 2 19 August      
                 
Rank Mark     Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 44.79   Q Leslie Djhone France FRA 18 Mar 81  
2 44.91   Q David Neville United States USA 1 Jun 84  
3 45.06     Joel Milburn Australia AUS 17 Mar 86  
4 45.09     Ricardo Chambers Jamaica JAM 7 Oct 84  
5 45.11     Jonathan Borlée Belgium BEL 22 Feb 88  
6 45.24     Godday James Nigeria NGR 9 Jan 84  
7 45.52     Andretti Bain Bahamas BAH 1 Dec 85  
8 45.59     Andrew Steele Great Britain GBR 19 Sep 84  
400 m Men     Semifinal 3 19 August      
                 
Rank Mark     Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 44.12   Q LaShawn Merritt United States USA 27 Jun 86  
2 44.60   Q Martyn Rooney Great Britain GBR 3 Apr 87  
3 44.64   Q Johan Wissman Sweden SWE 2 Dec 82  
4 44.82   Q Rennie Quow Trinidad and Tobago TTO 25 Aug 87  
5 44.94     Gary Kikaya DR Congo COD 4 Feb 80  
6 45.56     Michael Mathieu Bahamas BAH 24 Jun 84  
7 45.56     Sean Wroe Australia AUS 18 Mar 85  
8 45.81     Cédric Van Branteghem Belgium BEL 13 Mar 79  

Men's 400m - Round 1

 

Jeremy Wariner’s quest to become only the second two-time Olympic 400m champion began this morning without a hitch.

Running in the outside lane, the two-time World champion cruised to a 45.23 victory in the last of seven heats to easily advance to romorrow’s (19) semi-finals.

Two races earlier his chief challenger for Olympic gold, fellow American LaShawn Merritt, shook out the early morning cobwebs with a 44.96 victory, more than 0.20 seconds ahead of the chase pack led by Nigerian Saul Weigopwa (45.19).

“I ran a smart, easy race,” said Merritt, who defeated Wariner twice this season, including at the U.S. Trials.

The fastest heat was the second, with a blanket finish producing four sub-44.90 clockings. Underscoring his solid podium potential was Chris Brown of The Bahamas who cruised to a 44.79 victory, just a tick ahead of Australian Joel Milburn, who impressed with a 44.80 career best, a 0.19 second improvement for the 22-year-old.

“It seems that every time I’m here to race these guys in the first round, they bring their best,” said Brown, who lowered his career best and national record to 44.40 this year.

Swede Johan Wissman, a World championships finalist a year ago, was next in 44.81, also a season’s best, with African record holder Gary Kikaya fourth in 44.89, also a season’s best.

Britons Martyn Rooney and Andrew Steele, who are sharing a room here in Beijing, won the fourth and sixth heats respectively. Particularly impressive was the run by the 23-year-old Steele, whose 44.94 was his first jaunt into sub-45 territory, and a huge improvement from his previous 45.31 career best. Rooney, already a sub-45 man at 44.72, won handily in 45.00 ahead of Australian Sean Wroe, who lowered his personal best to 45.17 to finish second.

Behind Steele, Trinidad’s Renny Quow (45.13) and Bahamian Michael Mathieu (45.17) also advanced.

Frenchman Leslie Djhone got Day 4 rolling in the first race of the morning, crossing the line in 45.12 ahead of American David Neville (45.22). Dhjone took the win despite not being particularly fond of mornings. Said the Frenchman: “The race was too early. I didn’t get a good night’s sleep. I almost fell asleep during the warm-up.”

Heat 3 went to Costa Rican national record holder Nery Brenes in 45.39, ahead of Nigerian James Godday (45.49) and Bahamian Andretti Bain (45.96), the NCAA champion.

The morning’s major casualty was Canadian Tyler Christopher, who captured the World Indoor title five months ago. Well back midway through the final bend, he continued to lose ground down the homestretch and finished a well-beaten fourth in Heat 6, clocking 45.67. Ahead of him was Jamaican Michael Blackwood, a 2004 finalist, whose 45.56 was the second fastest among non-qualifiers.

Alleyne Francique of Grenada, a two-time World Indoor champion, also exited early after a sixth place showing in the opening round, clocking just 46.15.

Bob Ramsak for the IAAF

400 m Men     Heat 1 18 August      
                 
Rank Mark     Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 45.12   Q Leslie Djhone France FRA 18 Mar 81  
2 45.22   Q David Neville United States USA 1 Jun 84  
3 45.37   Q William Collazo Cuba CUB 31 Aug 86  
4 45.43     Kevin Borlée Belgium BEL 22 Feb 88  
5 45.52     Denis Alekseyev Russia RUS 26 Dec 87  
6 45.89     Young Talkmore Nyongani Zimbabwe ZIM 2 Sep 83  
7 46.06     Éric Milazar Mauritius MRI 1 Jun 75  
8 46.29     Garologelwane Masheto Botswana BOT 1 Nov 84  
400 m Men     Heat 2 18 August      
                 
Rank Mark     Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 44.79   Q Chris Brown Bahamas BAH 15 Oct 78  
2 44.80   Q Joel Milburn Australia AUS 17 Mar 86  
3 44.81   Q Johan Wissman Sweden SWE 2 Dec 82  
4 44.89     Gary Kikaya DR Congo COD 4 Feb 80  
5 45.66     Sanjay Ayre Jamaica JAM 19 Jun 80  
6 46.28     Arismendy Peguero Dominican Republic DOM 7 Aug 80  
7 48.54     Ivano Bucci San Marino SMR 1 Dec 86  
8 53.11     Liu Xiaosheng China CHN 5 Jan 88  
400 m Men     Heat 3 18 August      
                 
Rank Mark     Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 45.36   Q Nery Brenes Costa Rica CRC 25 Sep 85  
2 45.49   Q Godday James Nigeria NGR 9 Jan 84  
3 45.96   Q Andretti Bain Bahamas BAH 1 Dec 85  
4 46.32     Niko Verekauta Fiji FIJ 16 Feb 87  
5 46.60     Fernando de Almeida Brazil BRA 3 Aug 85  
6 46.76     Lewis Banda Zimbabwe ZIM 16 Sep 82  
7 46.79     Vincent Mumo Kenya KEN 3 Aug 82  
8 47.12     Ali Babiker Nagmeldin Sudan SUD 22 Feb 86  
400 m Men     Heat 4 18 August      
                 
Rank Mark     Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 45.00   Q Martyn Rooney Great Britain GBR 3 Apr 87  
2 45.17   Q Sean Wroe Australia AUS 18 Mar 85  
3 45.22   Q Ricardo Chambers Jamaica JAM 7 Oct 84  
4 46.10     Erison Hurtault Dominica DMA 29 Dec 84  
5 46.34     Andrés Silva Uruguay URU 27 Mar 86  
6 46.38     Rudolf Götz Czech Republic CZE 10 Apr 83  
7 46.39     Yuzo Kanemaru Japan JPN 18 Sep 87  
400 m Men     Heat 5 18 August      
                 
Rank Mark     Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 44.96   Q LaShawn Merritt United States USA 27 Jun 86  
2 45.19   Q Saul Welgopwa Nigeria NGR 14 Jun 84  
3 45.25   Q Claudio Licciardello Italy ITA 11 Jan 86 NUR
4 45.25     Jonathan Borlée Belgium BEL 22 Feb 88  
5 45.63     Ato Stephens Trinidad and Tobago TTO 19 Jun 79  
6 46.15     Alleyne Francique Grenada GRN 6 Jun 76  
7 46.59     Yeimer Mosquera Colombia COL 8 Jan 84  
8 47.89     Siraj Williams Liberia LBR 5 Mar 84  
400 m Men     Heat 6 18 August      
                 
Rank Mark     Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 44.94   Q Andrew Steele Great Britain GBR 19 Sep 84  
2 45.13   Q Rennie Quow Trinidad and Tobago TTO 25 Aug 87  
3 45.17   Q Michael Mathieu Bahamas BAH 24 Jun 84  
4 45.56     Michael Blackwood Jamaica JAM 29 Aug 76  
5 45.67     Tyler Christopher Canada CAN 3 Oct 83  
6 46.30     Joel Phillip Grenada GRN 12 Sep 87  
7 46.46     Félix Martínez Puerto Rico PUR 4 Feb 85  
8 47.83     Daniel Dąbrowski Poland POL 23 Sep 83  
400 m Men     Heat 7 18 August      
                 
Rank Mark     Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 45.23   Q Jeremy Wariner United States USA 31 Jan 84  
2 45.36   Q Tabarie Henry United States Virgin Islands ISV 1 Dec 87 NR
3 45.54   Q Cédric Van Branteghem Belgium BEL 13 Mar 79  
4 45.83     David Gillick Ireland IRL 9 Jul 83  
5 46.03     Maksim Dyldin Russia RUS 15 May 87  
6 46.28     Myhaylo Knysh Ukraine UKR 22 Nov 83  
7 47.10     Mathieu Gnaligo Benin BEN 13 Dec 86  
8 49.08     Naiel Santiago d'Almeida São Tomé and Príncipe STP 20 Oct 86  
 
Detailed View
 

Round 1

The first round was held on 18 August. The first three runners of each heat (Q) plus the next three overall fastest runners (q) qualified for the semifinals.

Heat 1

Rank Lane Athlete Nationality Time Notes React
1 4 Leslie Djhone France 45.12 Q 0.190
2 5 David Neville United States 45.22 Q 0.189
3 6 William Collazo Cuba 45.37 Q, SB 0.180
4 8 Kévin Borlée Belgium 45.43 q 0.149
5 9 Denis Alekseyev Russia 45.52   0.299
6 3 Young Talkmore Nyongani Zimbabwe 45.89   0.249
7 7 Eric Milazar Mauritius 46.06   0.209
8 2 Gakologelwang Masheto Botswana 46.29 SB 0.183

Heat 2

Rank Lane Athlete Nationality Time Notes React
1 6 Chris Brown Bahamas 44.79 Q 0.205
2 7 Joel Milburn Australia 44.80 Q, PB 0.155
3 4 Johan Wissman Sweden 44.81 Q, SB 0.229
4 5 Gary Kikaya DR Congo 44.89 q, SB 0.184
5 8 Sanjay Ayre Jamaica 45.66   0.177
6 9 Arismendy Peguero Dominican Republic 46.28   0.236
7 3 Ivano Bucci San Marino 48.54 SB 0.209
8 2 Liu Xiaosheng China 53.11   0.245

Heat 3

Rank Lane Athlete Nationality Time Notes React
1 8 Nery Brenes Costa Rica 45.36 Q 0.196
2 3 James Godday Nigeria 45.49 Q 0.200
3 9 Andretti Bain Bahamas 45.96 Q 0.225
4 7 Niko Verekauta Fiji 46.32 SB 0.161
5 6 Fernando de Almeida Brazil 46.60   0.158
6 2 Lewis Banda Zimbabwe 46.76   0.244
7 4 Vincent Mumo Kiilu Kenya 46.79   0.212
8 5 Nagmeldin Ali Abubakr Sudan 47.12   0.247

Heat 4

Rank Lane Athlete Nationality Time Notes React
1 7 Martyn Rooney Great Britain 45.00 Q 0.207
2 8 Sean Wroe Australia 45.17 Q, PB 0.182
3 5 Ricardo Chambers Jamaica 45.22 Q 0.211
4 3 Erison Hurtault Dominica 46.10   0.246
5 9 Andrés Silva Uruguay 46.34   0.265
6 2 Rudolf Götz Czech Republic 46.38   0.157
7 6 Yuzo Kanemaru Japan 46.39   0.225
  4 California Molefe Botswana DNS    

Heat 5

Rank Lane Athlete Nationality Time Notes React
1 2 LaShawn Merritt United States 44.96 Q 0.214
2 7 Saul Weigopwa Nigeria 45.19 Q 0.172
3 8 Claudio Licciardello Italy 45.25 Q, PB 0.186
4 3 Jonathan Borlée Belgium 45.25 q, PB 0.225
5 6 Ato Modibo Trinidad and Tobago 45.63   0.195
6 9 Alleyne Francique Grenada 46.15   0.215
7 5 Geiner Mosquera Colombia 46.59   0.268
8 4 Siraj Williams Liberia 47.89   0.288

Heat 6

Rank Lane Athlete Nationality Time Notes React
1 7 Andrew Steele Great Britain 44.94 Q, PB 0.248
2 5 Renny Quow Trinidad and Tobago 45.13 Q 0.266
3 6 Michael Mathieu Bahamas 45.17 Q, PB 0.193
4 8 Michael Blackwood Jamaica 45.56   0.204
5 2 Tyler Christopher Canada 45.67   0.172
6 3 Joel Phillip Grenada 46.30   0.198
7 9 Félix Martínez Puerto Rico 46.46   0.347
8 4 Daniel Dąbrowski Poland 47.83   0.260

Heat 7

Rank Lane Athlete Nationality Time Notes React
1 9 Jeremy Wariner United States 45.23 Q 0.253
2 6 Tabarie Henry Virgin Islands 45.36 Q, NR 0.165
3 2 Cedric van Branteghem Belgium 45.54 Q 0.203
4 4 David Gillick Ireland 45.83   0.275
5 5 Maksim Dyldin Russia 46.03   0.194
6 3 Myhaylo Knysh Ukraine 46.28   0.260
7 7 Mathieu Gnanligo Benin 47.10   0.207
8 8 Naiel Santiago d'Almeida São Tomé and Príncipe 49.08   0.178

Semifinals

Semifinal 1

19 August 2008 - 21:45
Rank Lane Athlete Nationality Time Notes React
1 6 Jeremy Wariner United States 44.15 Q 0.224
2 5 Chris Brown Bahamas 44.59 Q 0.244
3 6 Kévin Borlée Belgium 44.88 NR 0.162
4 7 Nery Brenes Costa Rica 44.94 NR 0.169
5 4 Saul Weigopwa Nigeria 45.02 SB 0.168
6 2 William Collazo Cuba 45.06 PB 0.191
7 8 Tabarie Henry Virgin Islands 45.19 NR 0.165
8 2 Claudio Licciardello Italy 45.64   0.259

Semifinal 2

19 August 2008 - 21:52
Rank Lane Athlete Nationality Time Notes React
1 6 Leslie Djhone France 44.79 Q, SB 0.159
2 4 David Neville United States 44.91 Q 0.190
3 5 Joel Milburn Australia 45.06   0.187
4 9 Ricardo Chambers Jamaica 45.09   0.220
5 3 Jonathan Borlée Belgium 45.11 PB 0.191
6 8 James Godday Nigeria 45.24   0.185
7 2 Andretti Bain Bahamas 45.52   0.196
8 7 Andrew Steele Great Britain 45.59   0.216

Semifinal 3

19 August 2008 - 21:59
Rank Lane Athlete Nationality Time Notes React
1 7 LaShawn Merritt United States 44.12 Q 0.187
2 6 Martyn Rooney Great Britain 44.60 Q, PB 0.126
3 8 Johan Wissman Sweden 44.64 q, SB 0.211
4 5 Renny Quow Trinidad and Tobago 44.82 q, PB 0.204
5 2 Gary Kikaya DR Congo 44.94   0.187
6 9 Michael Mathieu Bahamas 45.56   0.203
7 4 Sean Wroe Australia 45.56   0.205
8 3 Cedric van Branteghem Belgium 45.81   0.199

Final

 
LaShawn Merritt won by a margin of almost a second.
Rank Lane Athlete Nationality Time Reaction
time
Notes
1st 4 LaShawn Merritt United States 43.75 0.318 PB
2nd 7 Jeremy Wariner United States 44.74 0.209  
3rd 9 David Neville United States 44.80 0.293  
4 5 Chris Brown Bahamas 44.84 0.231  
5 6 Leslie Djhone France 45.11 0.164  
6 8 Martyn Rooney Great Britain 45.12 0.208  
7 2 Renny Quow Trinidad and Tobago 45.22 0.201  
8 3 Johan Wissman Sweden 45.39 0.218  

 

 

 

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