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2008 Olympic Games Beijing - Men's Long jump

 

 

Host City: Beijing, China Format: Top 12 and ties and all those reaching 8.15 metres advanced to the final.
Date Started: August 16, 2008  
Date Finished: August 18, 2008  
(Competitors: 39; Countries: 32; Finalists: 12)  
    Venue(s): Beijing National Stadium, Beijing
Overview by IAAF    2008_olympic_stadium.jpg
Just three men reached the automatic qualifying standard of 8.15. Saladino, who had jumped 8.73 earlier in the year and was recovering from injury, managed 8.01 to advance in ninth place of the qualifiers. Leading the way was Louis Tsátoumas who jumped 8.27. The Greek had spanned 8.44 a month earlier, but then had three fouls in the final. Saladino appeared to be favouring his injury, reaching 8.17 in round 2, behind Makusha’s 8.19. He then took the lead with 8.21 and ensured gold with 8.34 in the fourth. A tight battle for the other medals was won by Mokoena’s 8.24, with Camejo (8.20), edging Makusha and Martinez (8.19) for the bronze. The winning jump was the shortest in 36 years.
       
Summary by Sports-reference.com      
The qualifying round saw the long jumpers struggle with the runway and their steps, and many jumpers had difficulty getting fair marks, with 45 fouls of the 107 attempts. Shockingly, no American long jumper qualified for the final. Previously, save for the 1980 boycott, no Olympic long jump had been contested without an American on the medal stand, much less in the final. The favorite in the event was Panama’s Irving Saladino and although he struggled in the qualifying, barely getting through, he did not disappoint in the final. The first round lead was taken by Zimbabwe’s Ngoni Makusha with 8.19 (26-10½), but Saladino took the lead in round three with 8.21 (26-11¼). South Africa’s Geoffrey Mokoena jumped 8.24 (27-0½) early in round three to take the lead, but Saladino then popped the winning jump of 8.34 (27-4½) later in that round. In the final round, Cuba’s Ibrahim Camejo went 8.20 (26-11) to secure the bronze medal. Saladino’s winning mark of 8.34 was the shortest gold medal winner since the 1972 Olympics (Randy Williams with 8.24 27-0½).
 

Records

Prior to this competition, the existing world and Olympic records were as follows.

World record United States Mike Powell (United States) 8.95 m Tokyo, Japan 30 August 1991
Olympic record  Bob Beamon (USA) 8.90 m Mexico City, Mexico 18 October 1968

No new world or Olympic records were set for this event.

 
        Results        

The men's long jump at the 2008 Olympic Games took place on 16 and 18 August at the Beijing Olympic Stadium.

The qualifying standards were 8.20 m (26.9 ft) (A standard) and 8.05 m (26.41 ft) (B standard).

This event marked the first time that an American did not compete in the final phase in a non-boycotted Olympic competition. On the other hand, Panama achieved its first gold medal in its Olympic history.

Men's Long Jump - Final

 

Panama celebrates its inaugural Olympic gold medal thanks to the 8.34m victory of World champion and world season leader Irving Saladino.

1948 Olympic sprinter Lloyd LaBeach’s two bronze medals are Panama’s only previous athletics success in Games’ history.

Saladino had registered two fouls two days ago before he pulled out a last round qualification to gain entry to the final. He was tentative in his approach, perhaps running at 90% of his normal speed then, and he remained so in his opening attempt tonight, and fouled.

After the sprinting we have seen in Beijing there seems little doubt that the Mondo Super X Performance track is second to none but the speed of the surface has played havoc with the aspirations of the world’s best long jumpers at these Games.

Having already sent an array of global finalists scurrying to alter their runway marks in an effort not to over chute the board in qualification on Saturday, Saladino and his fellow finalists tonight seemed to never come to terms with this super fast flooring.

That Saladino had the best series there is no debate, an 8.17, 8.21 and 8.34 coming in rounds 2, 3 and 4 but that these results were surrounded by fouls summed up a scrappy competition overall. The winning distance is the lowest at which the Olympic crown has been earned since 1972 (8.24m).

We are no longer in the dominant eras of Lewis, Powell, Pedroso, and seem also to be at the tail end of the career of Dwight Phillips, the 2004 Olympic champion whose previous dominance just three years ago took him to his second World title in Helsinki 2005. He did not even make the US team to these Games after finishing fourth in their Trials.

With this historical backdrop of an event in statistical decline, Saladino has taken up the gauntlet, his 8.73 Area record in Hengelo earlier this year the clearest indication of his potential if he can successfully nurse a persistently returning knee injury.

‘Olympic and World champion’ is superlative pairing achieved by few in their careers and while the competition and distances achieved were low key, Saladino prevailed.

World Indoor champion Godfrey Khotso Mokoena of South Africa made it a good fight briefly taking the lead in round four before Saladino, jumping last after the third round cut, recaptured the lead with his winning 8.34m. With both men fouling their last two efforts, anti-climax is a term that comes to mind.

The battle for bronze was exceptionally tight with just four centimetres separating third to six places. Cuba’s Ibrahim Camejo launched his 8.20m effort in the last round which by one centimetre denied Zimbabwe, in the person of Ngonidzashe Makusha, its first ever Olympic track and field medal.

The 21-year-old Makusha has improved dramatically this year from a 7.69m PB (2007) to an 8.30m Area record (12 June), and as this is his first ever senior global championships he should be pleased with his fourth place when the hurt of losing a medal at the last moment subsides.

The last round was very much Cuba’s, as Camejo’s compatriot Wilfredo Martinez launched an 8.19 assault to take fifth place, while Senegal’s Ndiss Kaba Badji who had held fourth place with 8.16 since the end of round four, found himself relegated to sixth by the two Cubans’ last gasps.

Chris Turner for the IAAF

Long jump Men     Final 18 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 8.34 -0.3   Irving Saladino Panama PAN 23 Jan 83  
2 8.24 0.0   Godfrey Mokoena South Africa RSA 6 Mar 85  
3 8.20 0.2   Ibrahim Camejo Cuba CUB 28 Jun 82  
4 8.19 0.6   Ngonidzashe Makusha Zimbabwe ZIM 11 Mar 87  
5 8.19 -0.4   Wilfredo Martínez Cuba CUB 9 Jan 85  
6 8.16 0.2   Ndiss Kaba Badji Senegal SEN 21 Sep 83  
7 8.07 -0.1   Luis Felipe Méliz Spain ESP 11 Aug 79  
8 8.00 -0.3   Roman Novotný Czech Republic CZE 5 Jan 86  
9 7.85 0.1   Gable Garenamotse Botswana BOT 30 Jun 79  
10 7.84 -0.4   Greg Rutherford Great Britain GBR 17 Nov 86  
11 7.80 0.0   Hussein Taher Al-Sabee Saudi Arabia KSA 14 Nov 79  
  NM     Loúis Tsátoumas Greece GRE 12 Feb 82  

Men's Long Jump qualification

 

The Olympic champion Dwight Phillips never even made it on to the plane to Beijing having finished fourth in the US Trials. His compatriots who did touch down in China did so at such a low level this evening that no American will appear in the final of the Olympic Games for the first time in the history of this event, besides the 1980 Moscow boycott year of course.

Flying the furthest of the two qualifying pools which were run-off on two parallel runways on the back straight was Greece’s Louis Tsatoumas (8.27m / +0.7m/s wind). He headed Group A and the only other automatic qualifiers for the final (8.15m or better) also came from here. Next best was Cuban Ibrahim Camejo (8.23 / +0.5) and then Britain’s Greg Rutherford (8.16 / -0.1).

World Indoor champion Godfrey Khotso Mokoena of South Africa was one centimetre below the automatic mark (8.14 / +0.3) on his third having an 8.03 on his first leap.

8.14m (0.0) was also a mark matched by the leader of Group B, Zimbabwe’s Ngonidzashe Makusha.

With Cuban’s Wilfredo Martinez of Cuba (8.07), Senegal’s Ndiss Kaba Badji (8.07) and World champion Irving Saladino of Panama (8.01), in Group B, and Saudi Hussein Taher Al-Sabee (8.04), in Group B, the only others over 8m tonight, this can politely be called a low key qualification round.

Saladino’s approach to the board tonight can be described as tentative at best. He has a persistent knee injury, so perhaps he was protecting himself. Whatever the reason his lack lustre run-up very nearly caused his downfall. Two fouls were his opening gambit before he pulled out his third round leap, and significantly in between he did a lot of chatting with his coach who was sitting in the spectator tribune next to the runway.

Gable Garenamotse of Botswana, the 2008 African champion, jumped 7.95, as did Spain’s Luis Meliz, in Group A, and Czech Roman Novotny was the lowest of the others going through to the final with his best of 7.94.

Not making the grade was European champion and World silver medallist Andrew Howe of Italy, who has obviously not recovered his form after sustaining a leg injury running a 200m at the European Cup in June.

Chris Turner for the IAAF

Long jump Men     Qualification 16 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 8.27 0.1 Q Loúis Tsátoumas Greece GRE 12 Feb 82  
2 8.23 0.5 Q Ibrahim Camejo Cuba CUB 28 Jun 82  
3 8.16 -0.1 Q Greg Rutherford Great Britain GBR 17 Nov 86  
4 8.14 0.3 Q Godfrey Mokoena South Africa RSA 6 Mar 85  
5 8.14 0.0 Q Ngonidzashe Makusha Zimbabwe ZIM 11 Mar 87  
6 8.07 0.1 Q Wilfredo Martínez Cuba CUB 9 Jan 85  
7 8.07 -0.5 Q Ndiss Kaba Badji Senegal SEN 21 Sep 83  
8 8.04 -0.4 Q Hussein Taher Al-Sabee Saudi Arabia KSA 14 Nov 79  
9 8.01 0.2 Q Irving Saladino Panama PAN 23 Jan 83  
10 7.95 0.1 Q Luis Felipe Méliz Spain ESP 11 Aug 79  
11 7.95 0.4 Q Gable Garenamotse Botswana BOT 30 Jun 79  
12 7.94 -0.2 Q Roman Novotný Czech Republic CZE 5 Jan 86  
13 7.93 0.6   Stephan Louw Namibia NAM 26 Feb 75  
14 7.93 0.4   Mohamed Salman Al-Khuwalidi Saudi Arabia KSA 19 Jun 81  
15 7.91 -0.1   Tyrone Smith Bermuda BER 7 Aug 84  
16 7.90 0.1   Fabrice Lapierre Australia AUS 17 Oct 83  
17 7.88 0.1   Yahya Berrabah Morocco MAR 13 Oct 81  
17 7.88 0.2   Tommi Evilä Finland FIN 6 Apr 80  
19 7.87 -0.2   Trevell Quinley United States USA 16 Jan 83  
20 7.81 -0.2   Andrew Howe Italy ITA 12 May 85  
21 7.81 0.3   Salim Sdiri France FRA 26 Oct 78  
22 7.79 -0.1   Brian Johnson United States USA 25 Mar 80  
23 7.77 0.0   Sebastian Bayer Germany GER 11 Jun 86  
24 7.77 0.2   Hugo Chila Ecuador ECU 22 Jul 87  
24 7.77 0.3   Andriy Makarchev Ukraine UKR 15 Nov 85  
26 7.75 -0.1   Mauro da Silva Brazil BRA 26 Dec 86  
27 7.70 0.2   Chris Tomlinson Great Britain GBR 15 Sep 81  
28 7.70 0.2   Li Runrun China CHN 24 Feb 83  
29 7.69 -0.1   Tareq Bougtaïb Morocco MAR 30 Apr 81  
30 7.64 0.0   Herbert McGregor Jamaica JAM 13 Sep 81  
31 7.63 -0.1   Morten Jensen Denmark DEN 2 Dec 82  
32 7.62 0.3   Louis Tristán Peru PER 1 May 84  
33 7.62 -0.2   Marcin Starzak Poland POL 20 Oct 85  
34 7.58 0.0   Henry Dagmil Philippines PHI 7 Dec 81  
35 7.54 -0.5   Nikolai Atanasov Bulgaria BUL 11 Dec 74  
36 7.53 0.0   Julien Fivaz Switzerland SUI 9 Jan 79  
37 7.35 -0.1   Vladimir Malyavin Russia RUS 4 Mar 73  
38 7.34 0.4   Miguel Pate United States USA 13 Jun 79  
  NM     Zhou Can China CHN 20 May 79  
 
Detailed View
 

Qualifying round

Qualifying Performance 8.15 (Q) or at least 12 best performers (q) advance to the Final.

Rank Group Name Nationality 1 2 3 Mark Remarks
1 A Louis Tsatoumas Greece 8.27
(+0.1)
    8.27 Q
2 A Ibrahim Camejo Cuba 8.23
(+0.5)
    8.23 Q
3 A Greg Rutherford Great Britain 8.16
(-0.1)
    8.16 Q
4 A Khotso Mokoena South Africa 8.03
(-0.1)
x 8.14
(-0.1)
8.14 q
5 B Ngonidzashe Makusha Zimbabwe 8.14
(0.0)
7.94
(0.0)
- 8.14 q
6 B Wilfredo Martínez Cuba 7.92
(+0.4)
7.80
(+0.4)
8.07
(+0.1)
8.07 q
7 B Ndiss Kaba Badji Senegal 7.65
(-0.1)
7.79
(-0.1)
8.07
(-0.5)
8.07 q, SB
8 A Hussein Taher Al-Sabee Saudi Arabia 5.47
(+0.3)
8.04
( -0.4)
x 8.04 q
9 B Irving Saladino Panama x x 8.01
(+0.2)
8.01 q
10 A Luis Felipe Méliz Spain x 7.77
(-0.1)
7.95
(+0.1)
7.95 q
11 A Gable Garenamotse Botswana 7.58
(+0.3)
x 7.95
(+0.4)
7.95 q
12 B Roman Novotný Czech Republic 7.75
(+0.3)
7.81
(-0.1)
7.94
(-0.2)
7.94 q
13 A Stephan Louw Namibia 7.73
(+0.1)
x 7.93
(+0.6)
7.93  
14 B Mohamed Salman Al-Khuwalidi Saudi Arabia x x 7.93
(+0.4)
7.93  
15 B Tyrone Smith Bermuda 6.95
(+0.1)
7.63
(-0.6)
7.91
(-0.1)
7.91  
16 B Fabrice Lapierre Australia 7.90
(+0.1)
x x 7.90  
17 A Yahya Berrabah Morocco 7.88
(+0.1)
x x 7.88  
17 A Tommi Evilä Finland x x 7.88
(+0.2)
7.88  
19 B Trevell Quinley United States x x 7.87
(-0.2)
7.87  
20 B Andrew Howe Italy 7.73
(+0.1)
7.81
( -0.2)
x 7.81  
21 A Salim Sdiri France x x 7.81
(+0.3)
7.81  
22 B Brian Johnson United States x 7.79
(-0.1)
x 7.79  
23 A Sebastien Bayer Germany x 7.43
(+0.1)
7.77
(0.0)
7.77  
24 A Hugo Chila Ecuador 7.77
(+0.2)
x x 7.77  
24 B Andriy Makarchev Ukraine 7.77
(+0.3)
x x 7.77  
26 A Mauro da Silva Brazil x 7.75
(-0.1)
x 7.75  
27 B Chris Tomlinson Great Britain 7.52
(+0.4)
7.62
(0.0)
7.70
(+0.2)
7.70  
28 A Li Runrun China 7.70
(+0.2)
x 7.56
(+0.1)
7.70 SB
29 B Tarik Bouguetaib Morocco 7.69
(-0.1)
x x 7.69  
30 B Herbert McGregor Jamaica 7.64
(0.0)
7.46
(+0.3)
7.36
(0.0)
7.64  
31 A Morten Jensen Denmark x 7.58
(+0.3)
7.63
(-0.1)
7.63  
32 B Louis Tristán Peru 7.58
(+0.1)
7.62
(+0.3)
x 7.62  
33 A Marcin Starzak Poland x x 7.62
(-0.2)
7.62  
34 A Henry Dagmil Philippines 7.58
(0.0)
x x 7.58  
35 A Nikolai Atanasov Bulgaria x x 7.54
(-0.5)
7.54  
36 B Julien Fivaz Switzerland 7.53
(0.0)
x x 7.53  
37 A Vladimir Malyavin Russia 7.32
(-0.2)
7.35
(-0.1)
x 7.35  
38 B Miguel Pate United States x 7.34
(+0.4)
x 7.34  
  B Zhou Can China - - - NM  
  B Arnaud Casquette Mauritius       DNS  
  A Issam Nima Algeria       DNS  
 

Final

Rank Athlete Nationality 1 2 3 4 5 6 Result Notes
1st Irving Saladino Panama x
(+0.1)
8.17
(-0.1)
8.21
(+0.1)
8.34
(-0.3)
x
(-0.2)
x
(-0.5)
8.34
(-0.3)
 
2nd Khotso Mokoena South Africa 7.86
(+0.1)
x
(0.0)
8.02
(+0.2)
8.24
(0.0)
x
(-0.2)
x
(-0.4)
8.24
(0.0)
 
3rd Ibrahim Camejo Cuba 7.94 8.09 8.08 7.88 7.93 8.20 8.20  
4 Ngonidzashe Makusha Zimbabwe 8.19 8.06 8.05 8.10 8.05 6.48 8.19  
5 Wilfredo Martínez Cuba 7.60 7.90 x 8.04 x 8.19 8.19  
6 Ndiss Kaba Badji Senegal 8.03 x 8.02 8.16 8.03 7.92 8.16 SB
7 Luis Felipe Méliz Spain x 8.02 x x 7.98 8.07 8.07  
8 Roman Novotný Czech Republic 7.87 7.75 8.00 x 7.82 7.94 8.00  
 
9 Gable Garenamotse Botswana x 7.85 -       7.85  
10 Greg Rutherford Great Britain x 5.20 7.84       7.84  
11 Hussein Taher Al-Sabee Saudi Arabia 7.80 x x       7.80  
  Louis Tsatoumas Greece x x x       NM  

 

 

 

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