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2008 Olympic Games Beijing - Men's Shot Put

 

 

Host City: Beijing, China Format: Top 12 and ties and all those reaching 20.40 metres advanced to the final.
Date Started: August 15, 2008  
Date Finished: August 15, 2008  
(Competitors: 44; Countries: 33; Finalists: 12)  
    Venue(s): Beijing National Stadium, Beijing
Overview by IAAF    2008_olympic_stadium.jpg
The favourites were the Americans, led by World Champion Hoffa, and Athens fifth-placer Mikhnevich, who had thrown 22.00 two weeks prior to the Games. The qualifiers were led by Majewski, who threw a lifetime best of 21.04, with Adam Nelson next best at 20.56. Majewski (20.80) led from Cantwell (20.73) at the end of the first round of the final, but Mikhnevich took the lead at the start of the second round with 21.05, to be threatened shortly after by the surprising Armstrong’s 21.04. Majewski eased into the lead in round three with 21.21, and then set his third lifetime best of the day with 21.51. The only other 21m throw came in the final round, when big (1.98/145Kg) Cantwell reached 21.09. The other American throwers disappointed, with Hoffa reaching only 20.53, and Nelson fouling out. Majewski showed himself to be a fine big-time competitor as well as being the tallest-ever (2.04) Olympic Shot Put Champion.
       
Summary by Sports-reference.com      
The American threesome of Adam Nelson, Christian Cantwell, and Reese Hoffa was considered dominant and an American sweep seemed to be a real possibility. In the end they were left gasping just to get any medal. All three qualified easily but the problems were highlighted by Nelson, silver medalist in 2000 and 2004, who fouled three times and did not advance, with no fair mark in the final. The leader in round one was Pole Tomasz Majewski with 20.80 (68-3), but Belarussian Andrey Mikhnevich moved ahead in round two with 21.05 (69-0¾). Canada’s Dylan Armstrong moved into second with 21.04 (69-0½) and Cantwell moved into third with 20.98 (68-10). Majewski came back in the third stanza, taking the lead with 21.21 (69-7) which would eventually be good enough for the gold medal. Cantwell, Armstrong, and Mikhnevich could not improve in rounds four or five, but Majewski did, tossing 21.51 (70-7), the only 70-footer and the best mark of the competition. Going into the final round, no American was in a podium position, with Cantwell in fourth, and Hoffa standing seventh with 20.53 (67-4¼). Cantwell then came thru for the silver medal with a final round effort of 21.09 (69-2½), preventing the vaunted American threesome from being shut out. Majewski’s previous best finish at a major competition had been fifth at the 2007 World Championships.
This result would stand for five years but in 2013 it was announced that a retest of a urine sample given by Mikhnevich at the 2005 IAAF World Athletics Championships had, with the use of updated testing techniques, revealed the presence of no less than three banned substances. Since the Belarussian had previously served a doping ban between 2001 and 2003, this second offence was punishable by a lifetime suspension and all of his performances since the 2005 World Championships were automatically voided by the IAAF. In 2014 the Canadian Olympic Committee announced that the IOC had confirmed that Armstrong was promoted to the bronze medal position in place of Mikhnevich. Armstrong received his bronze medal on 15 February 2015, in his hometown of Kamloops, British Columbia, almost 7 years after the event had ended.
 

Records

Prior to this competition, the existing world and Olympic records were as follows.

World record  Randy Barnes (USA) 23.12 m Westwood, United States 20 May 1990
Olympic record  Ulf Timmermann (GDR) 22.47 m Seoul, South Korea 23 September 1988

No new world or Olympic records were set for this event.

 
        Results        

The men's shot put event at the 2008 Olympic Games took place on 15 August at the Beijing Olympic Stadium.

The qualifying standards were 20.30 m (66.6 ft) (A standard) and 19.80 m (64.96 ft) (B standard).

Andrei Mikhnevich was initially awarded the bronze medal but he was later disqualified for doping and the medal was awarded to 4th-place finisher Dylan Armstrong.

Men's Shot Put - FINAL

 

In Sydney 2000 a bearded, bandana wearing Finn, who bore a striking resemblance to an archetypal Hollywood film pirate, upstaged the American favourites with a PB show in qualification and then took gold in the final.

Today a similarly looking bearded, bandana wearing Pole followed a similar script this time with a PB in both qualification and final to hijack US hopes for gold as the stadium sound system appropriately played the theme from Pirates of the Caribbean to accompany his plunder of the Olympic title.

Tomasz Majewski who had come into these Olympics with a newly struck PB of 20.97m in London (25 July), had improved this morning in qualification to 21.04m.

The 26-year-old who had taken the World Indoor bronze this winter in Valencia, with a national record of 20.93, made his intentions very plain when his 20.80 opener this evening held top spot at the end of that first salvo.

He was to lose that position briefly in the next round, thanks to the 21m+ puts of Belarussia’s 2003 World champion Andrei Mikhnevich (21.05) and Dylan Armstrong, whose 21.04m, was a Canadian record. Also, going ahead of Majewski at that point was World Indoor champion Christian Cantwell (20.98).

The Pole, who was putting second last of the 12 man final, then unleashed a 21.21m PB third round broadside of such ferocity that the hopes of the three men flotillas of both the USA and Belarussia were ultimately sunk. Majewski compounded their misery with a 21.51m battering on his next attempt.

Notably, the third round saw the sad sight of 2005 World champion and two-time silver medallist Adam Nelson of the USA grounded by a third and final foul. Another of the USA favourites World champion Reese Hoffa didn’t do much better, an overall best in the competition of 20.58m secured only seventh place.

Though Russia’s Pavel Lyzhyn accomplished a PB of 20.98 in the third and repeated it in the fourth round none of those who qualified for their final three throws came close to offering any meaningful response to Majewski. Well, that was until Cantwell with in the last round hopped from fourth to silver with a 21.09 release.

Neither Mikhnevich nor Armstrong could respond well enough to the American with their last puts – 20.93 and a foul respectively – and so had to be satisfied with bronze and fourth places on the basis of their second round efforts.

Once Mikhnevich’s last shot landed in the sector, Majewski’s celebrations began, and he really didn’t have his heart in his and the competition’s last effort, but it still landed creditably at 20.44.

What a phenomenal day for Majewski. PBs in qualification and final, and a series about which he could only have dreamt about yesterday – 20.80; 20.47; 21.21; 21.51; x ; 20.44.

In 2004, he didn’t make it out of qualification (19.55), now he is Olympic champion and richly deserves the golden treasure he hauled in today.

The last and only Polish medal in Olympic Shot Put history had been taken in 1972 by Wladyslaw Komar who in a similar scenario to tonight’s expected USA vs Belarussia battle had surprised the more fancied USA and GDR squads to take gold in Munich’s Olympic stadium.

Appropriately given our theme, Komar later became an actor, starring in Roman Polanski's 1986 film ‘Pirates’. Komar died in a car crash in 1998.

Chris Turner for the IAAF

A Polish ‘pirate’ steals Shot Put booty in Beijing

 

In Sydney 2000 a bearded, bandana wearing Finn, who bore a striking resemblance to an archetypal Hollywood film pirate, upstaged the American favourites with a PB show in qualification and then took gold in the final.

Today a similarly looking bearded, bandana wearing Pole followed a similar script this time with a PB in both qualification and final to hijack US hopes for gold as the stadium sound system appropriately played the theme from Pirates of the Caribbean to accompany his plunder of the Olympic title.

Tomasz Majewski who had come into these Olympics with a newly struck PB of 20.97m in London (25 July), had improved this morning in qualification to 21.04m.

The 26-year-old who had taken the World Indoor bronze this winter in Valencia, with a national record of 20.93, made his intentions very plain when his 20.80 opener this evening held top spot at the end of that first salvo.

He was to lose that position briefly in the next round, thanks to the 21m+ puts of Belarussia’s 2003 World champion Andrei Mikhnevich (21.05) and Dylan Armstrong, whose 21.04m, was a Canadian record. Also, going ahead of Majewski at that point was World Indoor champion Christian Cantwell (20.98).

The Pole, who was putting second last of the 12 man final, then unleashed a 21.21m PB third round broadside of such ferocity that the hopes of the three men flotillas of both the USA and Belarussia were ultimately sunk. Majewski compounded their misery with a 21.51m battering on his next attempt.

Notably, the third round saw the sad sight of 2005 World champion and two-time silver medallist Adam Nelson of the USA grounded by a third and final foul. Another of the USA favourites World champion Reese Hoffa didn’t do much better, an overall best in the competition of 20.58m secured only seventh place.

Though Russia’s Pavel Lyzhyn accomplished a PB of 20.98 in the third and repeated it in the fourth round none of those who qualified for their final three throws came close to offering any meaningful response to Majewski. Well, that was until Cantwell with in the last round hopped from fourth to silver with a 21.09 release.

Neither Mikhnevich nor Armstrong could respond well enough to the American with their last puts – 20.93 and a foul respectively – and so had to be satisfied with bronze and fourth places on the basis of their second round efforts.

Once Mikhnevich’s last shot landed in the sector, Majewski’s celebrations began, and he really didn’t have his heart in his and the competition’s last effort, but it still landed creditably at 20.44.

What a phenomenal day for Majewski. PBs in qualification and final, and a series about which he could only have dreamt about yesterday – 20.80; 20.47; 21.21; 21.51; x ; 20.44.

In 2004, he didn’t make it out of qualification (19.55), now he is Olympic champion and richly deserves the golden treasure he hauled in today.

The last and only Polish medal in Olympic Shot Put history had been taken in 1972 by Wladyslaw Komar who in a similar scenario to tonight’s expected USA vs Belarussia battle had surprised the more fancied USA and GDR squads to take gold in Munich’s Olympic stadium.

Appropriately given our theme, Komar later became an actor, starring in Roman Polanski's 1986 film ‘Pirates’. Komar died in a car crash in 1998.

Chris Turner for the IAAF

Shot Put Men     Final 15 August      
                 
Rank Mark     Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 21.51     Tomasz Majewski Poland POL 30 Aug 81  
2 21.09     Christian Cantwell United States USA 30 Sep 80  
3 21.04     Dylan Armstrong Canada CAN 15 Jan 81 NR
4 20.98     Pavel Lyzhyn Belarus BLR 24 Mar 81  
5 20.63     Yuriy Bilonoh Ukraine UKR 9 Mar 74  
6 20.53     Reese Hoffa United States USA 8 Oct 77  
7 20.42     Pavel Sofyin Russia RUS 4 Sep 81  
8 20.41     Rutger Smith Netherlands NED 9 Jul 81  
9 20.06     Yury Bialou Belarus BLR 20 Mar 81  
10 19.67     Ivan Yushkov Russia RUS 15 Jan 81  
  DQ     Andrei Mikhnevich        
  NM     Adam Nelson United States USA 7 Jul 75  

Men's Shot Put Qualification

 

We previewed the men’s Shot Put indicating that he could be a surprise threat to the US favourites, and Poland’s Tomasz Majewski certainly delivered that promise in the qualification round this morning.

The 26-year-old Pole has been coming closer and closer to 21m this year, with a 20.93 national record indoors this winter, and a 20.97m PB outdoors in London at the end of July. That performance very nearly upstaged the Americans on that occasion, two of whom were putting here too. Today Majewski’s result in Group A was definitively in a class of its own. A 21.04m opening heave was a new personal best and led the next best overall qualifier for tonight’s final by an impressive 48cm.

We are reminded of a similar result in Sydney 2000, when Finn Arsi Harju blasted out a 21.39m PB in qualifying and went on to take a surprise gold in the final ahead of the US favourites.

The question now is can Majewski compose himself for the final with the weight of his newly found status on his shoulders?

With 20.40m as the automatic qualifying mark for the final, two-time Olympic silver medallist and current season world leader Adam Nelson, led the three Americans through to tonight’s final with 20.56m (topped Group B).

The other two thirds of the US trio progressed well too. World Indoor champion Christian Cantwell put 20.48 (though he needed two attempts) for second place behind the Pole in Group A, while World outdoor champion Reese Hoffa was fourth in that same group with 20.41.

The only other automatic qualifiers were 2003 World champion Andrei Mikhnevich of Belarussia - who recently improved his PB to 22m - who showed again he will be a threat in the final with second round put of 20.48 to take second place in Group B behind Nelson.

Canada’s Dylan Armstrong with a first round put of 20.43m was the other ‘automatic’ in fifth place overall ahead of Hoffa in Group A.

Of the remaining six qualifiers who make the final, defending Olympic champion Yuriy Bilonog of Ukraine had a best of 20.16m, while Rutger Smith of the Netherlands, fourth at last year’s World champs, had 20.13m.

There will be three Belarussians and two Russians in the final, to challenge the USA, Pavel Lyzhyn (20.36) and Yury Bialou (20.12) joining Mikhnevich, while Pavel Sofin (20.29) and Ivan Yushkov (20.02) are the Russian pair.

Germany will be disappointed that Peter Sack who has put 21.19 this season failed to make the final (13th overall) only managing 20.01m.

Denmark’s Joachim Olsen, bronze medallist in Athens continues to be a shadow of his former greatness, 19.74m, was his best. That it registered the Dane’s furthest put of 2008 says it all!

QUOTE of the day - Adam Nelson: On being in Beijing - "it still hasn't hit me yet. But when it does it will be euphoric. I might crawl out of my skin."

Chris Turner for the IAAF

Shot Put Men     Qualification 15 August      
                 
Rank Mark     Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 21.04   Q Tomasz Majewski Poland POL 30 Aug 81  
2 20.56   Q Adam Nelson United States USA 7 Jul 75  
3 20.48   Q Christian Cantwell United States USA 30 Sep 80  
4 20.43   Q Dylan Armstrong Canada CAN 15 Jan 81  
5 20.41   Q Reese Hoffa United States USA 8 Oct 77  
6 20.36   Q Pavel Lyzhyn Belarus BLR 24 Mar 81  
7 20.29   Q Pavel Sofyin Russia RUS 4 Sep 81  
8 20.16   Q Yuriy Bilonoh Ukraine UKR 9 Mar 74  
9 20.13   Q Rutger Smith Netherlands NED 9 Jul 81  
10 20.12   Q Yury Bialou Belarus BLR 20 Mar 81  
11 20.02   Q Ivan Yushkov Russia RUS 15 Jan 81  
12 20.01     Peter Sack Germany GER 27 Jul 79  
13 20.01     Andriy Semenov Ukraine UKR 4 Jul 84  
14 19.94     Dorian Scott Jamaica JAM 1 Feb 82  
15 19.91     Justin Anlezark Australia AUS 14 Aug 77  
16 19.87     Hamza Alić Bosnia and Herzegovina BIH 20 Jan 79  
17 19.87     Anton Lyuboslavskiy Russia RUS 26 Jun 84  
18 19.81     Manuel Martínez Spain ESP 7 Dec 74  
19 19.81     Miran Vodovnik Slovenia SLO 11 Sep 77  
20 19.75     Scott Martin Australia AUS 12 Oct 82  
21 19.74     Joachim Olsen Denmark DEN 31 May 77  
22 19.73     Yves Niaré France FRA 20 Jul 77  
23 19.58     Carlos Véliz Cuba CUB 12 Aug 87  
24 19.57     Māris Urtāns Latvia LAT 9 Feb 81  
25 19.57     Taavi Peetre Estonia EST 5 Jul 83  
26 19.51     Sultan Abdulmajeed Al-Hebshi Saudi Arabia KSA 23 Feb 83  
27 19.41     Petr Stehlík Czech Republic CZE 15 Apr 77  
28 19.35     Nedžad Mulabegović Croatia CRO 4 Feb 81  
29 19.32     Milan Haborák Slovakia SVK 11 Jan 73  
30 19.20     Reynaldo Proenza Cuba CUB 20 Nov 84  
31 19.07     Germán Lauro Argentina ARG 2 Apr 84  
32 19.01     Asmir Kolašinac Serbia SRB 15 Oct 84  
33 18.74     Lajos Kürthy Hungary HUN 22 Oct 86  
34 18.64     Ivan Emilianov Moldova MDA 19 Feb 77  
35 18.45     Mihaíl Stamatóyiannis Greece GRE 20 May 82  
36 18.42     Yasser Ibrahim Egypt EGY 2 May 84  
37 18.05     Marco Fortes Portugal POR 26 Sep 82  
38 17.96     Marco Verni Chile CHI 27 Feb 76  
39 17.43     Chang Ming-Huang Chinese Taipei TPE 7 Aug 82  
  DQ     Andrei Mikhnevich        
  NM     Robert Häggblom Finland FIN 9 Aug 82  
  NM     Georgi Ivanov Bulgaria BUL 13 Mar 85  
  NM     Amin Nikfar Iran IRI 2 Jan 81  
  NM     Alexis Paumier Cuba CUB 21 Jan 75  
 
Detailed View
 

Qualifying round

Qualification: 20.40 (Q) or at least 12 best performers (q) advance to the final.

Rank Group Name Nationality 1 2 3 Result Notes
1 A Tomasz Majewski Poland 21.04     21.04 Q, PB
2 B Adam Nelson United States 20.56     20.56 Q
3 A Christian Cantwell United States 20.11 20.48   20.48 Q
4 A Dylan Armstrong Canada 20.43     20.43 Q
5 A Reese Hoffa United States 20.41     20.41 Q
6 B Pavel Lyzhyn Belarus 20.36 x x 20.36 q
7 A Pavel Sofin Russia 20.29 x x 20.29 q
8 B Yuriy Bilonog Ukraine 19.93 20.16 19.57 20.16 q
9 B Rutger Smith Netherlands 20.13 x 19.97 20.13 q
10 A Yury Bialou Belarus x 20.12 19.87 20.12 q
11 B Ivan Yushkov Russia 20.02 19.83 20.00 20.02 q
12 B Peter Sack Germany 19.76 x 20.01 20.01  
13 A Andriy Semenov Ukraine 18.95 19.59 20.01 20.01  
14 B Dorian Scott Jamaica 19.54 19.94 19.71 19.94  
15 B Justin Anlezark Australia 19.91 19.75 x 19.91  
16 A Hamza Alic Bosnia and Herzegovina 19.33 19.48 19.87 19.87  
17 A Anton Lyuboslavskiy Russia 19.14 x 19.87 19.87  
18 B Manuel Martínez Spain 19.62 19.45 19.81 19.81  
19 B Miran Vodovnik Slovenia 18.72 x 19.81 19.81  
20 A Scott Martin Australia 19.75 x x 19.75  
21 A Joachim Olsen Denmark 19.62 19.69 19.74 19.74 SB
22 B Yves Niare France x x 19.73 19.73  
23 A Carlos Véliz Cuba 19.58 19.25 19.16 19.58  
24 A Māris Urtāns Latvia 18.78 19.57 19.34 19.57  
25 B Taavi Peetre Estonia x x 19.57 19.57  
26 B Sultan Abdulmajeed Al-Hebshi Saudi Arabia x 18.67 19.51 19.51  
27 B Petr Stehlik Czech Republic x 19.41 x 19.41  
28 B Nedzad Mulabegovic Croatia 19.11 19.35 18.88 19.35  
29 A Milan Haborák Slovakia x 19.32 x 19.32  
30 B Reinaldo Proenza Cuba 19.15 19.06 19.20 19.20  
31 A Germán Lauro Argentina 19.07 x 18.96 19.07  
32 A Asmir Kolašinac Serbia 18.32 x 19.01 19.01  
33 A Lajos Kürthy Hungary 18.38 x 18.74 18.74  
34 B Ivan Emilianov Moldova 18.64 18.27 x 18.64  
35 A Mihail Stamatoyiannis Greece x 18.45 18.30 18.45  
36 B Yasser Farag Egypt 18.37 x 18.42 18.42  
37 B Marco Fortes Portugal x x 18.05 18.05  
38 A Marco Antonio Verni Chile x 17.96 x 17.96  
39 B Chang Ming-Huang Chinese Taipei 16.13 16.98 17.43 17.43  
  A Robert Häggblom Finland x x x NM  
  A Georgi Ivanov Bulgaria x x x NM  
  B Alexis Paumier Cuba x x x NM  
  B Amin Nikfar Iran x x x NM  
  B Andrei Mikhnevich Belarus 20.38 20.48   20.48 DSQ
  A Ralf Bartels Germany       DNS  
 

Final

Rank Athlete Nationality 1 2 3 4 5 6 Result Notes
1st Tomasz Majewski Poland 20.80 20.47 21.21 21.51 x 20.44 21.51 PB
2nd Christian Cantwell United States 20.39 20.98 20.88 20.86 20.69 21.09 21.09  
3rd Dylan Armstrong Canada 20.62 21.04 x x 20.47 x 21.04 NR
4 Pavel Lyzhyn Belarus 20.33 20.15 20.98 20.98 20.40 x 20.98 PB
5 Yuriy Bilonog Ukraine 20.63 x 20.53 20.46 20.31 x 20.63 SB
6 Reese Hoffa United States x 19.81 20.53 20.38 x x 20.53  
7 Pavel Sofin Russia 20.42 x x x x x 20.42  
 
8 Rutger Smith Netherlands 20.41 x 20.30       20.41  
9 Yury Bialou Belarus 20.06 x x       20.06  
10 Ivan Yushkov Russia 19.67 19.55 x       19.67  
  Adam Nelson United States x x x       NM  
  Andrei Mikhnevich Belarus 20.73 21.05 x 20.78 20.57 20.93 21.05 DSQ (doping)

 

 

 

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