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1912  Stockholm Summer Olympics

1912 Summer Olympics - The Results (Rowing)

Rowing at the 1912 Stockholm Summer Games

 

 

Host City: Stockholm, Sweden
Date Started: July 17, 1912
Date Finished: July 19, 1912
Events: 4

Participants: 184 (184 men and 0 women) from 14 countries
Youngest Participant: FRA François Elichagaray (16 years, 318 days)
Oldest Participant: GBR Julius Beresford (44 years, 18 days)
Most Medals (Athlete): 66 athletes with 1 medal
Most Medals (Country): GBR Great Britain (4 medals)

 

Participating nations

A total of 185(*) rowers from 14 nations competed at the Stockholm Games:

  •  Australasia (10)
  •  Austria (6)
  •  Belgium (6)
  •  Bohemia (1)

 

  •  Canada (10)
  •  Denmark (15)
  •  Finland (6)
  •  France (17)

 

  •  Germany (26)(*)
  •  Great Britain (24)
  •  Hungary (11)

 

  •  Norway (24)
  •  Russia (1)
  •  Sweden (28)
(*) NOTE: Both German coxwains from the coxed fours event are counted.
  

Overview

The rowing events at Stockholm were conducted at [Djurgårdsbrunnsviken]. The course allowed two boats to race concurrently with a straighaway of 1,200 metres and then a very slight starboard turn, followed later by a very slight port turn.

The program was decided in early 1910 and approved by the IOC at their Session in Budapest in 1911. After the IOC Session, the Swedish Rowing Committee was approached about including events for coxless fours, double sculls, and coxed pairs. But with the course encompassing two turns, the committee felt that these boats would be too difficult to handle. Each nation could enter two boats per event. The inrigger coxed fours was contested at Stockholm for the only time in Olympic history.

There were no bronze medals awarded in rowing at the 1912 Olympic Games. The rowing course allowed only two boats at a time, so the finals consisted of only two crews, who won the gold and silver medals. The losing semi-finalists were not awarded bronze medals, although we have listed the number of semi-finalists by nation below in the medal statistics. In both the inrigger coxed fours and the coxed eights, there was only one losing semi-finalist.

Amateur definitions

The definition for the rowing competitions was:

An amateur is one:

  • who has never received payment as a trainer;
  • who has never competed for money prizes;
  • who has never competed or given a display for payment;
  • who has never competed, or given a display, against a professional;
  • who has never drawn any pecuniary gain from athletic exercises by selling, exchanging, pawning, or hiring out any prize won in a competition.

An amateur shall be allowed, when taking part in races or displays, to receive his travelling and hotel expenses from the club to which he belongs, or, with the consent of the said club, from the club arranging the competition or display, without forfeiting his amateur status. Payment for such a journey, however, may be made only through the club which he represents in the said competition. No competitor shall be allowed to make any pecuniary gain or profit from such payment.

A professional shall not be allowed to take part in any competitions or displays for amateurs, neither may he officiate as judge or in any other capacity. A professional is one who as a seaman, fisherman, or in any other capacity, has in any way, in the exercise of his calling, engaged in rowing within two years previous to the date of competition.

  

Medal summary

Event Gold Silver Bronze
Single Sculls

 Wally Kinnear (GBR)  Polydore Veirman (BEL)  Everard Butler (CAN)
 Mart Kuusik (RUS)
Coxed four  Germany (GER)
Albert Arnheiter
Hermann Wilker
Rudolf Fickeisen
Otto Fickeisen
Karl Leister
 Great Britain (GBR)
Julius Beresford
Karl Vernon
Charles Rought
Bruce Logan
Geoffrey Carr
 Denmark (DEN)
Erik Bisgaard
Rasmus Frandsen
Mikael Simonsen
Poul Thymann
Ejgil Clemmensen
Coxed four, Inriggers

 Denmark (DEN)
Ejler Allert
Christian Hansen
Carl Møller
Carl Pedersen
Poul Hartmann
 Sweden (SWE)
Ture Rosvall
William Bruhn-Möller
Conrad Brunkman
Herman Dahlbäck
Leo Wilkens
 Norway (NOR)
Claus Høyer
Reidar Holter
Max Herseth
Frithjof Olstad
Olav Bjørnstad
Eights

 Great Britain (GBR)
Leander
Edgar Burgess
Sidney Swann
Leslie Wormald
Ewart Horsfall
James Angus Gillan
Stanley Garton
Alister Kirby
Philip Fleming
Henry Wells
 Great Britain (GBR)
New College, Oxford
William Fison
William Parker
Thomas Gillespie
Beaufort Burdekin
Frederick Pitman
Arthur Wiggins
Charles Littlejohn
Robert Bourne
John Walker
 Germany (GER)
Berlin
Otto Liebing
Max Bröske
Max Vetter
Willi Bartholomae
Fritz Bartholomae
Werner Dehn
Rudolf Reichelt
Hans Matthiae
Kurt Runge
  

Bronze medals

Bronze medals were not awarded to the losing semi finalists in any of the events, they were instead given diplomas of merit. Although the IOC database currently includes bronze medallists for every event, it is not certain if this an oversight on their behalf or if a retrospective change has been made.

  File:1912 Stockholm Rowing Club's Boat House.JPG

The Stockholm rowing club's boat house.

 

Medal table

 
Rank Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1  Great Britain (GBR) 2 2 0 4
2  Denmark (DEN) 1 0 1 2
 Germany (GER) 1 0 1 2
4  Belgium (BEL) 0 1 0 1
 Sweden (SWE) 0 1 0 1
6  Canada (CAN) 0 0 1 1
 Norway (NOR) 0 0 1 1
 Russia (RUS) 0 0 1 1
Totals (8 nations) 4 4 5 13

Men's Single Sculls

Host City: Stockholm, Sweden
Venue(s): Djurgården Bay, Stockholm
Date Started: July 17, 1912
Date Finished: July 19, 1912
Format: 2,000 metres

Competitors 13from 12 nations

Summary

Other than Cecil McVilly of Australia and Everard Butler of Canada, all the scullers were European. Butler was the top North American sculler, being superior to any of the United States’ men of the time. He had won the 1911 and 1912 championship of the National Association of Amateur Oarsmen in the single sculls.

The top European sculler was likely William Kinnear, who had won the Diamond Challenge Sculls at Henley in 1910 and 1911. But Kinnear lost at Henley early in 1912 to A. A. Stuart, who had also won the same event in 1909. The European championships were held later in 1912 and would be won by Belgium’s Polydore Veirman.

Kinnear, Butler, and Veirman made it through to the semi-finals. The biggest early casualty was McVilly, who was disqualified in the first round for colliding with Martin Stahnke’s (GER) boat. In the semi-finals, Veirman defeated Hugo Maximilian Kusick of Russia. The other semi was closely fought with Kinnear holding off Butler by one length. This set up a final between Kinnear and Veirman, probably the two favorites. In the final, Veirman led from the start, and was up by ½ length at 500 metres. But Kinnear pulled even at the halfway mark and pulled away to win by one length.

Final

Final
Place Rower Time
Gold  Wally Kinnear (GBR) 7:47.3
Silver  Polydore Veirman (BEL) 7:56.0

Semifinals

 
Semifinal 1
Place Rower Time Qual.
1  Polydore Veirman (BEL) 7:41.0 QF
Bronze  Mart Kuusik (RUS) (7:43.9)  
Semifinal 2
Place Rower Time Qual.
1  Wally Kinnear (GBR) 7:37.0 QF
Bronze  Everard Butler (CAN) 7:41.0  

Quarterfinals

Mészáros crossed in front of Veirman in the first quarterfinal, resulting in a protest and the contest being held over. The second time, Veirman got an early lead and kept it throughout. Simonsen abandoned the competition, giving Butler a walkover in the second quarterfinal. Kuusic won the final quarterfinal by three lengths, despite having been the only quarterfinalist to have already rowed during the day, in his rematch against Heinrich.
Quarterfinal 1
Place Rower Time Qual.
1  Polydore Veirman (BEL) 7:52.0 QS
2  József Mészáros (HUN) (7:57.9)  
Quarterfinal 2
Place Rower Time Qual.
1  Everard Butler (CAN) 7:39.9 QS
 Mikael Simonsen (DEN) DNS  
Quarterfinal 3
Place Rower Time Qual.
1  Wally Kinnear (GBR) 7:49.9 QS
2  Martin Stahnke (GER) 7:58.8  
Quarterfinal 4
Place Rower Time Qual.
1  Mart Kuusik (RUS) 7:45.2 QS
2  Károly Levitzky (HUN) 7:49.1  

Heats

Kuusic nearly collided with Heinrich in the first heat, leading to a protest that resulted in the heat being re-rowed the next day; Heinrich was disqualified in the second running of the heat. Three of the heats were walkovers.
Heat 1
Place Rower Time Qual.
1  Mart Kuusik (RUS) 7:45.2 QQ
2  Alfred Heinrich (AUT) DQ  
Heat 2
Place Rower Time Qual.
1  Martin Stahnke (GER) 8:28.8 QQ
2  Cecil McVilly (ANZ) DQ  
Heat 3
Place Rower Time Qual.
1  Everard Butler (CAN) 7:55.6 QQ
2  Axel Haglund (FIN) (8:11.8)  
Heat 4
Place Rower Time Qual.
1  Wally Kinnear (GBR) 7:44.0 QQ
2  Kurt Hoffmann (GER) (7:46.9)  
Heat 5
Place Rower Time Qual.
1  József Mészáros (HUN) 8:29.0 QQ
Heat 6
Place Rower Time Qual.
1  Mikael Simonsen (DEN) 8:14.0 QQ
2  Jan Šourek (BOH) DNF  
Heat 7
Place Rower Time Qual.
1  Károly Levitzky (HUN) 8:04.0 QQ
Heat 8
Place Rower Time Qual.
1  Polydore Veirman (BEL) 7:59.2 QQ

Final Standings

Rank Athlete Age Team NOC Medal  
1 Wally Kinnear 31 Great Britain GBR Gold  
2 Polydore Veirman 31 Belgium BEL Silver  
3T Mart Kuusik 34 Russia RUS Bronze  
3T Everard Butler 26 Canada CAN Bronze  
1 h1 r2/4 József Mészáros 27 Hungary HUN    
2 h3 r2/4 Martin Stahnke 23 Germany GER    
2 h4 r2/4 Károly Levitzky 27 Hungary HUN    
DNS h2 r2/4 Mikael Simonsen 29 Denmark DEN    
2 h3 r1/4 Axel Matias Haglund 27 Finland FIN    
2 h4 r1/4 Kurt Hoffmann 21 Germany GER    
AC h6 r1/4 Jan Å ourek 24 Bohemia BOH   DNF
AC h1 r1/4 Alfred Heinrich 32 Austria AUT   DQ
AC h2 r1/4 Cecil McVilly 21 Australasia ANZ   DQ

Men's Coxed Fours, Outriggers

Host City: Stockholm, Sweden
Venue(s): Djurgården Bay, Stockholm
Date Started: July 17, 1912
Date Finished: July 19, 1912
Format: 2,000 metres

Competitors 56from 9 nations

Summary

In the Stewards’ Challenge Cup at the Henley Regatta, the Thames Rowing Club had won in 1909 and 1911. The European Championships had been won in 1909 and 1910 by crews from Italy and in 1911 and 1912 by Switzerland. But neither Italy nor Switzerland entered the Olympic event.

This left the field to the British crew from the Thames Rowing Club and the somewhat unknown German crew from the Ludwigshafener Ruderverein. The Thames crew barely survived the semi-finals. Germany’s Ludwigshafener crew was not pressed in getting to the final where they defeated the British by two lengths.

The men's coxed fours was a rowing event held as part of the Rowing at the 1912 Summer Olympics programme. It was the second appearance of the event, which had been held at the 1900 Summer Olympics but had been replaced by coxless fours at the 1904 and 1908 Games. The standard coxed fours event allowed for outriggers, while another event was held in 1912 for boats with inriggers. The competition was held from Wednesday to Friday, 17 to 19 July 1912.

Fifty six rowers from nine nations competed. Germany replaced their coxswain, maybe the Danish Polyteknisk replaced a rower, but this possible change is not counted.

Starting list

The following boats and/or rowing clubs participated:

  •  Austria Ruderverein Germania, Leibnitz (other sources report Leitmeritz)
  •  Belgium Royal Club Nautique de Grand
  •  Denmark København Roklubb
  •  Denmark Polyteknisk Roklub
  •  Finland Helsingfors R. K.
  •  France Société Nautique de Bayonne
  •  Germany Ludwigshafener Ruderverein
  •  Great Britain Thames R. C.
  •  Norway Christiania Roklub
  •  Norway Studenternes Roklub
  •  Sweden Vaxholm Roddklubb
1912 German coxed fours Ludwigshafen 2.JPG
The gold medal winning team of Germany

Final

The final was held on Friday, 19 July.

Final: 5.30 p.m After a very energetic race up to the 500 metres mark, where the two boats still lay side by side, the Germans began to take the lead and, at the kilometre mark, Ludwigshafen were about one length ahead. Thames R. C. fought pluckily, however, and stroke Bruce Logan deserves every credit for the courageous way in which he challenged the leader. But at the Englishmen's last spurt between the bath-nouse and the bridge, it was clear that the crew was done for, while the Germans, on the other hand, rowed with still greater energy than before. Ludwigshafen won brilliantly by a good two lengths, and passed the post in excellent condition.

The German Ludwigshafen beating the British Thames R. C. (under the bridge) in the final

The silver medal winning team of Great Britain

Final
Place Boat Bow Rower No.2 Rower No.3 Stroke Cox Time
Gold  Ludwigshafen (GER) Albert Arnheiter Hermann Wilker Rudolf Fickeisen Otto Fickeisen Karl Leister 6:59.4
Silver  Thames R. C. (GBR) Julius Beresford Karl Vernon Charles Rought Bruce Logan Geoffrey Carr  

Semifinals

Both semifinals were held on Friday, 19 July.

Semifinal 1: 1.30 p.m. The Danes rowed very energetically from the start and led by about half a length at the 500 metres mark. Here, however, the Germans came on with a short, powerful spurt, which gave them a lead that was afterwards retained, apparently without any great effort, and was gradually increased to about two and a half lengths, the distance separating the boats at the finish. The Germans crew possessed great physical power and was of a comparatively mature average age, features also characteristic of the English four representing the Thames R. C.. Ludwigshafen rowed, it is true, a pretty short stroke forwards, but, backwards, it was of a good length, with a quiet, finished recovery, and a powerful pull through the water. No. 3, with his billowing Germanic beard, reminded one of a Viking, and his appearance contrasted strangely with that of the other oarsmen, most of whom were clean shaven or had only small moustaches.

Semifinal 1
Place Boat Bow Rower No.2 Rower No.3 Stroke Cox Time Qual.
1  Ludwigshafen (GER) Albert Arnheiter Hermann Wilker Rudolf Fickeisen Otto Fickeisen Karl Leister 7:41.0 QF
Bronze  Polyteknisk (DEN) Erik Bisgaard Rasmus Frandsen Mikael Simonsen Poul Thymann Ejgil Clemmensen    

Semifinal 2: 2 p.m. With an energetic spurt, Thames R. C. took the lead from the very start, and 500 metres later the Norwegian boat was nearly a length behind. Thames R. C. kept its same rapid stroke even when the 1,000 metres mark was passed, rowing in good style from 34–36 to the Norwegians' 32–34. The last-named crew, however, pulled itself together for a spurt when close to the bath-house, so that at the bridge there was only a length between the boats. In the finish, the Norwegians showed such energy, and rowed in such fine style, that their effort will be remembered as one of the most noteworthy episodes of the regatta. Inch by inch they crept up the leaders, so that, in spite of the energetic, really desperate strokes of the Thames R. C. crew, the two boats passed the post almost simultaneously. The Norwegians, however, were about three metres behind their opponents.

Semifinal 2
Place Boat Bow Rower No.2 Rower No.3 Stroke Cox Time Qual.
1  Thames R. C. (GBR) Julius Beresford Karl Vernon Charles Rought Bruce Logan Geoffrey Carr 7:04.8 QF
2  Christiania (NOR) Henry Larsen Mathias Torstensen Theodor Klem Håkon Tønsager Ejnar Tønsager 7:05.0  

Quarterfinals

All quarterfinals were held on Thursday, 18 July.

Quarterfinal 1: 12.20 p.m. Half the course was covered with the boats side by side, the Finnish crew rowing 40 to the 32–34 of the Danes. The rapid stroke of the Finns was gained, however, at the expense of length, while the Danes rowed in beautiful style with a pronounced swing of the body and long, powerful strokes. At the bath-house the Danes, who had spurted after the half-distance, had a lead of about one and a half length, which was increased at the finish to nearly three lengths.

Quarterfinal 1
Place Boat Bow Rower No.2 Rower No.3 Stroke Cox Time Qual.
1  Polyteknisk (DEN) Erik Bisgaard Rasmus Frandsen Mikael Simonsen Poul Thymann Ejgil Clemmensen 7:09.0 QS
2  Helsinsfors R. K. (FIN) Johan Nyholm Oskar Forsman Karl Lönnberg Emil Nylund Valdemar Henriksson 7:12.5  

Quarterfinal 2: 12.40 p.m. After rowing 600 metres, the British crew had a lead of about halt a length which, during the remainder of the race, was gradfully increased to some two and a half lengths.

Quarterfinal 2
Place Boat Bow Rower No.2 Rower No.3 Stroke Cox Time Qual.
1  Thames R. C. (GBR) Julius Beresford Karl Vernon Charles Rought Bruce Logan Geoffrey Carr 7:14.5 QS
2  Studenternes (NOR) Øyvin Davidsen Leif Rode Theodor Schjøth Olaf Dahll Einar Eriksen    

Quarterfinal 3: 1 p.m. This was one of the most exciting heats in this round. Both crews rowed well from the start at 40 and 44 respectively, this speed afterwards falling to 32–36. The boats moved along rapidly side by side, but, in spite of the calls made by the strokes, neither crew showed any unevenness. Belgium led by about half a length at the boathouse, but the Norwegians had a lot in reserve and, after a brilliant finish, where the four rowed like one man, the last-named crew passed the post a clear length in front.

Quarterfinal 3
Place Boat Bow Rower No.2 Rower No.3 Stroke Cox Time Qual.
1  Christiania (NOR) Henry Larsen Mathias Torstensen Theodor Klem Håkon Tønsager Ejnar Tønsager 7:05.5 QS
2  Royal Club Nautique de Gand (BEL) Guillaume Visser Georges Van Den Bossche Edmond Van Waes Georges Willems Léonard Nuytens    

Quarterfinal 4: 1.20 p.m. The Germans rowed alone over the course.

Quarterfinal 4
Place Boat Bow Rower No.2 Rower No.3 Stroke Cox Time Qual.
1  Ludwigshafen (GER) Albert Arnheiter Hermann Wilker Rudolf Fickeisen Otto Fickeisen Karl Leister 7:14.4 QS

Heats

All heats were held on Wednesday, 17 July.

Heat 1: 6.20 p.m. The Danish boat raced without opponent.

Heat 1
Place Boat Bow Rower No.2 Rower No.3 Stroke Cox Time Qual.
1  Polyteknisk (DEN) Erik Bisgaard Rasmus Frandsen Mikael Simonsen Poul Thymann Ejgil Clemmensen 7:20.0 QQ

Heat 2: 6.40 p.m. For a long time the two boats kept side by side, both crews rowing in good style, the Frenchman at 38–32, the Finns at 40–32. During the last 500 metres, however, the last named crew went away from its opponents, which seemed unable to make any effective spurt.

Heat 2
Place Boat Bow Rower No.2 Rower No.3 Stroke Cox Time Qual.
1  Helsinsfors R. K. (FIN) Johan Nyholm Oskar Forsman Karl Lönnberg Emil Nylund Valdemar Henriksson 7:18.2 QQ
2  Société Nautique de Bayonne (FRA) André Mirambeau Louis Thomaturgé René Saintongey Pierre Alibert François Elichagaray    

Heat 3: 7 p.m. The Norwegian crew took the lead with much resolution, rowing in excellent style with a well-pronounced swing and a good grip of the water. The Austrians, too, rowed in good style but used the slide too early in the stroke, while their grip of the water was not quite so good as that of their opponents. The Norwegians went right away from their rivals and were the only ones to finish, Austria giving up the fight at the bridge.

Heat 3
Place Boat Bow Rower No.2 Rower No.3 Stroke Cox Time Qual.
1  Christiania (NOR) Henry Larsen Mathias Torstensen Theodor Klem Håkon Tønsager Ejnar Tønsager 7:15.0 QQ
2  Leibnitz (AUT) Richard Mayer Hugo Cužna Georg Kröder Fritz Krombholz Emil Jand DNF  

Heat 4: 7.20 p.m. The Norwegians undergraduates rowed over the course in good style.

Heat 4
Place Boat Bow Rower No.2 Rower No.3 Stroke Cox Time Qual.
1  Studenternes (NOR) Øyvin Davidsen Leif Rode Theodor Schjøth Olaf Dahll Einar Eriksen 7:27.4 QQ
 Donau (AUT)   DNS  

Heat 5: 7.40 p.m. Both boats started well, and kept together at an even speed until the 1,000 metres mark was reached. At this point the Danes delayed their response to the spurt made by the Belgians, and all the endeavours made during the remainder of the race to make up the two clear lengths lost at this point were in vain, the Belgians winning pretty easily.

Heat 5
Place Boat Bow Rower No.2 Rower No.3 Stroke Cox Time Qual.
1  Royal Club Nautique de Gand (BEL) Guillaume Visser Georges Van Den Bossche Edmond Van Waes Georges Willems Léonard Nuytens 7:15.0 QQ
2  Købnhavn (DEN) Hans Jørgensen Knud Gøtke Johan Praem Theodor Eyrich Silva Smedberg    

Heat 6: 8 p.m. Both crews began with a quick stroke and lay side by side for some distance, but after the 1,000 metres mark, the Germans, without any exertion, led by about half a length, the same distance separating the boats when the boathouse was passed. In the finish, the Germans put themselves two lengths in front of their rivals, and won with the greatest ease.

Heat 6
Place Boat Bow Rower No.2 Rower No.3 Stroke Cox Time Qual.
1  Ludwigshafen (GER) Albert Arnheiter Hermann Wilker Rudolf Fickeisen Otto Fickeisen Otto Maier[3] 7:06.6 QQ
2  Vaxholm (SWE) John Lager Axel Eriksson Ernst Wetterstrand Gunnar Lager Karl Sundholm    

Heat 7: 8.20 p.m. The British boat rowed over the course in a resolute but far from beautiful style.

Heat 7
Place Boat Bow Rower No.2 Rower No.3 Stroke Cox Time Qual.
1  Thames R. C. (GBR) Julius Beresford Karl Vernon Charles Rought Bruce Logan Geoffrey Carr 7:27.0 QQ
 Mainz (GER)   DNS  

Men's Coxed Fours, Inriggers

Host City: Stockholm, Sweden
Venue(s): Djurgården Bay, Stockholm
Date Started: July 17, 1912
Date Finished: July 18, 1912
Format: 2,000 metres

Competitors 30from 4 nations

Summary

The inrigger coxed fours event has only been contested once at the Olympics - in 1912. Inriggers is a rowing format only popular in the Nordic countries as is evidenced by the entry list. Two Swedish, two Norwegian, and one Danish crew were joined by a French boat. The French boat was trounced in round one by one of the Norwegian teams.

The men's coxed fours with inriggers, also referred to as the coxed four with jugriggers, was a rowing event held as part of the Rowing at the 1912 Summer Olympics programme. It was the only appearance of the restricted event. The competition was held on Wednesday and Thursday, 17 and 18 July 1912. Thirty rowers from four nations competed.

Starting list

The following boats and/or rowing clubs participated:

  •  Denmark Nykjøbings paa Falster Roklub
  •  France Société Nautique de Bayonne
  •  Norway Christiania Roklub
  •  Norway Ormsund Roklub
  •  Sweden Göteborgs Roddförening
  •  Sweden Roddklubben af 1912
1912 Danish coxed fours inriggers Nykjøbings paa Falster Roklub.JPG
The winning team of the Nykjøbings paa Falster Roklub.

Final

The final was held on Thursday, 18 July.

Final: 7.30 p.m. Both crews rowed nicely and evenly, keeping side by side, until the 1,000 metres mark was reached, when the Danish crew, exhibiting perfect style and great physical power, began to take the lead. The Swedish crew was somewhat handicapped by the circumstance that some of the men had taken part in a punishing race against New College in the men's eight competition the same day, and Carl Møller was not at all in form, owing to a bad boil on one of his legs. Consequently, they had little hope of winning when, before the bridge was reached, the Danes began a final spurt, which gave them the race by a clear length. The Danish crew can be taken as the model of perfect rowing in inriggers, and its well-deserved victory was greeted by everyone – not least by its Swedish opponents – with hearty cheers.

Final
Place Boat Bow Rower No.2 Rower No.3 Stroke Cox Time
Gold  Nykjøbings paa Falster (DEN) Ejler Allert Christian Hansen Carl Møller Carl Pedersen Poul Hartmann 7:44.6
Silver  Roddklubben af 1912 (SWE) Ture Rosvall William Bruhn-Möller Conrad Brunkman Herman Dahlbäck Leo Wilkens 7:56.9

Semifinals

Both semifinals were also held on Wednesday, 17 July.

Semifinal 1: 5.40 p.m. The Norwegians at once took the lead, which they kept for the first of the course, rowing 32–36 to the 34 of the Swedes. Halfway, the Swedish boat crept up to ist rival and, from the bath-house to the post, there was a most desperate struggle for victory, which was decided in favour of the home-crew by an energetic spurt at the last moment.


Semifinal 1
Place Boat Bow Rower No.2 Rower No.3 Stroke Cox Time Qual.
1  Roddklubben af 1912 (SWE) Ture Rosvall William Bruhn-Möller Conrad Brunkman Herman Dahlbäck Leo Wilkens 7:39.2 QF
Bronze  Ormsund (NOR) Claus Høyer Reidar Holter Max Herseth Frithjof Olstad Olav Bjørnstad    

Semifinal 2: 6 p.m. The crew rowed over in beautiful style, but without opponent.

Semifinal 2
Place Boat Bow Rower No.2 Rower No.3 Stroke Cox Time Qual.
1  Nykjøbings paa Falster (DEN) Ejler Allert Christian Hansen Carl Møller Carl Pedersen Poul Hartmann 7:59.5 QF

Quarterfinals

All quarterfinals were held on Wednesday, 17 July 1912.

Quarterfinal 1: 11 a.m. Both boats got well away, the Norwegians leading for the first hundred metres or so. Then the Swedish, who were rowing a somewhat qicker stroke, began to creep up, and soon passed their opponents, obtaining a lead which they retained for the rest of the race. The winning crew pulling from 32–38 a minute, the Norwegian stroke varying between 28 and 38. Both boats were very well rowed, and it was physical strength that gave Sweden the victory.

Quarterfinal 1
Place Boat Bow Rower No.2 Rower No.3 Stroke Cox Time Qual.
1  Roddklubben af 1912 (SWE) Ture Rosvall William Bruhn-Möller Conrad Brunkman Herman Dahlbäck Leo Wilkens 7:51.5 QS
2  Christiania (NOR) Gunnar Grantz Olaf Solberg Gustav Hæhre Hannibal Fegth John Bjørnstad    

Quarterfinal 2: 11.20 a.m. At the start, Sweden led with an energetic stroke of 36, while the Danes rowed a longer but very effective stroke, which they used to perfection. The forward half of the stroke was one of extraordinary length, with a fine finish and excellent carriage of the hands. The way the crew rowed like one man was beyond all praise, and the four showed that it fully deserved its great reputation. The Swedish crew also made a very good impression and was only a little worse than its Danish rival; most noteworthy, perhaps, was the energetic stubbornness with which the Swedes defended the lead they succeeded in gaining at the start. The Danish crew was in better training, however, and the Swedes were not able to maintain their position when the Danes – who had the inner curve at the bath-house – began their spurt. Surely and irresistibly the Danish boat came up to, and passed, the Swedish, which, although at Djurgård Bridge, it had the advantage of the inner curve, could make no use of its position, but was beaten by one and a half length.

Quarterfinal 2
Place Boat Bow Rower No.2 Rower No.3 Stroke Cox Time Qual.
1  Nykjøbings paa Falster (DEN) Ejler Allert Christian Hansen Carl Møller Carl Pedersen Poul Hartmann 7:52.0 QS
2  Göteborgs (SWE) Tage Johnson Axel Johansson Axel Gabrielsson Charles Gabrielsson Wilhelm Brandes    

Quarterfinal 3: 11.40 a.m. The two crews kept side by side for only 100 metres, the Norwegians then taking the lead and keeping it, without once being challenged by their rivals.

Quarterfinal 3
Place Boat Bow Rower No.2 Rower No.3 Stroke Cox Time Qual.
1  Ormsund (NOR) Claus Høyer Reidar Holter Max Herseth Frithjof Olstad Olav Bjørnstad 8:03.0 QS
2  Société Nautique de Bayonne (FRA) Charles Garnier Alphonse Meignant Auguste Richard Gabriel Poix François Elichagaray  

Men's Coxed Eights

Host City: Stockholm, Sweden
Venue(s): Djurgården Bay, Stockholm
Date Started: July 17, 1912
Date Finished: July 19, 1912
Format: 2,000 metres

Competitors 99from 8 nations

Summary

The last four European Championships had been won by France, Belgium, Italy, and Switzerland. The Grand Challenge Cup at the Henley Regatta had been won in 1910 and 1911 by a Magdalen College (Oxford) crew. In 1909 that title had been won by the Belgian crew from the Royal Club Nautique de Gand. Unfortunately the Gand crew was not at Stockholm, nor was Magdalen College. The British were represented by the Leander Club and New College (Oxford). Canada did send a Toronto Argonauts eight, which had won the 1911 championships at the National Association of Amateur Oarsmen.

In a bad draw, Leander and the Argonauts were drawn against each other in round one, with Leander narrowly defeating the Toronto crew. Leander also survived close races against Australasia in the quarters (by less than a boat length) and Germany in the semis. On the other hand, the New College crew had a relatively easy time of it, winning the first two rounds handily against Norway and Sweden, and receiving a bye in the semi-finals.

The final was closely fought. The two boats were even for 1,000 metres, when Leander pulled ahead before the series of turns. They were never caught, eventually winning by about one length. Leander was awarded possession of the Challenge Trophy for the coxed eights event, which had been donated in 1908 by the Italian Count and IOC Member, Eugenio Brunetta d’Usseaux.

The men's eights was a rowing event held as part of the Rowing at the 1912 Summer Olympics programme. It was the fourth appearance of the event. The competition was held from Wednesday to Friday, 17 to 19 July 1912. Ninety-nine rowers from eight nations competed

Starting list

The following boats and/or rowing clubs participated:

  •  Australasia Sydney Rowing Club
  •  Canada Toronto Argonaut
  •  France Société Nautique de Bayonne
  •  Germany Berliner Ruderverein von 1876
  •  Germany Sport Borussia, Berlin
  •  Great Britain Leander
  •  Great Britain New College, Oxford
  •  Hungary Hungária Evezős Egylet
  •  Norway Christiania Roklub
  •  Sweden Göteborgs Roddklubb
  •  Sweden Roddklubben af 1912
File:1912 British eights Leander.JPG
The winning team of the Leander.

Final

The final was held on Friday, 19 July.

Final: 6 p.m. The two boats rowed side by side until the 1,000 metres mark was passed, when Leander spurted in order to neutralize Robert Bourne's efforts at the bath-house, where New College had the inner curve. Then Philip Fleming pressed his men from the bath-house to the bridge, so that Leander led by a clear length at the latter place, all Robert Bourne's efforts being unable to prevent New College from falling behind. Leander won by about a length.

The silver medal winning New College with the wash of the gold medal winning Leander in the foreground.
Final
Place Boat Bow Rowers Rowers Stroke Cox Time
Gold  Leander (GBR) Edgar Burgess Sidney Swann
Leslie Wormald
Ewart Horsfall
James Angus Gillan
Stanley Garton
Alister Kirby
Philip Fleming Henry Wells 6:15.7
Silver  New College (GBR) William Fison William Parker
Thomas Gillespie
Beaufort Burdekin
Frederick Pitman
Arthur Wiggins
Charles Littlejohn
Robert Bourne John Walker 6:19.2

Semifinals

Both semifinals were held on Friday, 19 July.

Semifinal 1: 11.30 p.m. The New College raced without opponent. But Robert Bourne took his men over the course giving the spectators a good opportunity of seeing the pure English style of rowing, with its firm grip of the water and the quiet, almost stealthy recovery.

Semifinal 1
Place Boat Bow Rowers Rowers Stroke Cox Time Qual.
1  New College (GBR) William Fison William Parker
Thomas Gillespie
Beaufort Burdekin
Frederick Pitman
Arthur Wiggins
Charles Littlejohn
Robert Bourne John Walker 7:47.0 QF

Semifinal 2: 12 noon At the very start, Leander managed to get a couple of metres' lead, but the German crew soon recovered itself, and at the 500 metres mark was leading by about half a length. As seen from the shore, the English eight seemed to take the race very quietly, rowing scarcely more than 34 to their opponents' 38, and at the 1,000 metres mark the Germans were leading by nearly a length. Just before reaching the boat-house, Leander, which had the outside curve, spurted and managed to pick up about half a length, while the Germans, committed the fault of not making use of the advantage given by the possession of the inner curve, and making an extra exertion which have certainly increased the distance between them and the English crew, or, in any case, would have kept them at their previous distance in the rear. Philip Fleming put his men to a severe test from the bath-house to the bridge, and the determination and speed by means of which Leander drew level with their opponents after one minute's rapid spurt, were simply unique. The German crew was not rowed out, however, and a desperate struggle took place all the way from the bridge to the finish, the result being that Leander won by about half a length. Once more a British boat won with excellent tactics.

Semifinal 2
Place Boat Bow Rowers Rowers Stroke Cox Time Qual.
1  Leander (GBR) Edgar Burgess Sidney Swann
Leslie Wormald
Ewart Horsfall
James Angus Gillan
Stanley Garton
Alister Kirby
Philip Fleming Henry Wells 6:16.2 QF
Bronze  Berlin (GER) Otto Liebing Max Bröske
Max Vetter
Willi Bartholomae
Fritz Bartholomae
Werner Dehn
Rudolf Reichelt
Hans Matthiae Kurt Runge 6:18.6  

Quarterfinals

All quarterfinals were held on Thursday, 18 July.

Quarterfinal 1: 3.40 p.m. Both boats got off beautifully and kept side by side for the first 400 metres, the Swedish crew rowing a quicker stroke than New College (35 to 32). By degrees, however, Robert Bourne pushed his boat half a length in front and had this lead on reaching the inner curve at the bath-house, where he spurted in order to make use of the advantage afforded by the position, and the Swedish stroke answered too late. The result was, that at Djurgård Bridge Great Britain led by a length and Herman Dahlbäck, when on reaching the inner curve of his side of the course, did begin a spurt, but could not get his men to respond to his efforts. In the finish the Swedes regained a little of their lost ground, but they could not prevent New College from winning by a length. It was chiefly Robert Bourne's cleverness that decided the race, the manner in which he gathered his crew for the final burst being simply masterly.

Quarterfinal 1
Place Boat Bow Rowers Rowers Stroke Cox Time Qual.
1  New College (GBR) William Fison William Parker
Thomas Gillespie
Beaufort Burdekin
Frederick Pitman
Arthur Wiggins
Charles Littlejohn
Robert Bourne John Walker 6:19.0 QS
2  Roddklubben af 1912 (SWE) Gustaf Brunkman Per Mattson
Sebastian Tamm
Ted Wachtmeister
Conrad Brunkman
William Bruhn-Möller
Ture Rosvall
Herman Dahlbäck Leo Wilkens    

Quarterfinal 2: 4 p.m. In the German quarterfinal Berlin rowed in brilliant style with a long stroke, a fine swing and powerful grip of the water, followed by a quiet recovery. The other crew showed the same good qualities but not to an equal degree, and Berlin, which was leading by a length at the halfway, won by nearly two and a half lengths.

Sport Borussia with the winning Berlin in the background.
Quarterfinal 2
Place Boat Bow Rowers Rowers Stroke Cox Time Qual.
1  Berlin (GER) Otto Liebing Max Bröske
Max Vetter
Willi Bartholomae
Fritz Bartholomae
Werner Dehn
Rudolf Reichelt
Hans Matthiae Kurt Runge 6:22.2 QS
2  Sport Borussia (GER) Carl Eichhorn Ludwig Weinacht
Richard Friesicke
Andreas Wegener
Fritz Eggebrecht
Heinrich Landrock
Egbert Reinsfeld
Gottfried Gelfort Otto Charlet    

Quarterfinal 3: 4.20 p.m. Both crews started very well, Australia retaining its speed of about 40 for the whole of the race, while Leander was content with 36-34, the figures sometimes falling to 32. Sydney put all its weight into its stroke and led by a half length at the 1,000 metres mark. The time for half distance was 3:02; these figures showing the speed at which the boats were moving. At the boat-house Australia led and took the inner curve a clear length ahead. At this point, however, Philip Fleming began a terrific spurt, which resulted in his opponents# lead being diminished at the bridge to only half a length. The Australian eight now began to row somewhat raggedly and showed other signs of fatigue; Leander, on the contrary, beginning another magnificent spurt which lasted until the winning post was passed. Roger Fitzhardinge was not sufficiently supported by his men, so that the half length by which Australia led at the bridge was snatched out of its hands. The two boats lay side by side 100 metres from the finish, but Leander stayed better, and the English style allowed of more being got of the spurt, so that the British boat won by about three metres.

Leander Club (on the left) beating the Sydney Rowing Club
Quarterfinal 3
Place Boat Bow Rowers Rowers Stroke Cox Time Qual.
1  Leander (GBR) Edgar Burgess Sidney Swann
Leslie Wormald
Ewart Horsfall
James Angus Gillan
Stanley Garton
Alister Kirby
Philip Fleming Henry Wells 6:10.2 QS
2  Sydney (ANZ) John Ryrie Simon Fraser
Hugh Ward
Thomas Parker
Henry Hauenstein
Sydney Middleton
Harry Ross-Soden
Roger Fitzhardinge Robert Waley    

Heats

The heats were held on Wednesday, 17 July.

Heat 1: 12 noon The boats kept in company as far as to Stenudden, where the Germans began to show in front, their stroke spurting directly afterwards. The Frenchmen made no response and were soon a length behind. Halfway up the course, however, they showed signs of attempting an answering spurt, but went to pieces – in parts. Their opponents rowed as if they meant to win, and as regards style, muscle and training, were quite superior to the Frenchmen, a fact they displayed still more during the last half of the race. The Germans rowed a stroke varying between 32–38 to the minute. The French, rowing from 40–28 per minute, never seriously threatened their opponents, who won by about four lengths.

Heat 1
Place Boat Bow Rowers Rowers Stroke Cox Time Qual.
1  Sport Borussia (GER) Carl Eichhorn Ludwig Weinacht
Richard Friesicke
Andreas Wegener
Fritz Eggebrecht
Heinrich Landrock
Egbert Reinsfeld
Gottfried Gelfort Otto Charlet 6:45.1 QQ
2  Société Nautique de Bayonne (FRA) Jean Arné Gabriel St. Laurent
Marius Lejeune
Louis Lafitte
Jean Elichagaray
Joseph Campot
Etienne Lesbats
Pierre Alvarez François Elichagaray    

Heat 2: 12.20 p.m. Australia started at 44 for the first half minute, the Swedish keeping to 40. The perfectly trained visitors, who rowed like one man, took the lead after 200 metres and never lost it again. When about half the distance was covered, the Swedish boat showed signs of creeping up the Australians, but the latter increased the pace and passed the boat-huse two clear lengths ahead of their opponents, who showed evident signs of fatigue and were beginning to go pieces. The Australians rowed the whole time at a great pace, with only a slight swing, while the style employed by the Swedes bore greater resemblance to English methods. The home-crew was beaten by more than three lengths.

Heat 2
Place Boat Bow Rowers Rowers Stroke Cox Time Qual.
1  Sydney (ANZ) John Ryrie Simon Fraser
Hugh Ward
Thomas Parker
Henry Hauenstein
Sydney Middleton
Harry Ross-Soden
Roger Fitzhardinge Robert Waley 6:57.0 QQ
2  Göteborgs (SWE) Birger Amundin Ragnar Bergstedt
Gustaf Broberg
Simon Ericsson
Ivar Ryberg
Anders Almqvist
Arvid Svendel
Leif Sörvik Gillis Ahlberg    

Heat 3: 12.40 p.m. The German crew, which forced Germany's best eight, was in front all the time. The Hungarians rowed at a slower pace than their opponents during the whole of the race; they had a nice recovery but could get no good grip of the water and used the slide incorrectly, pushing it before the body. The Germans, on the other hand, rowed in clean English style, even if they had not the same extraordinarily rapid grip of the water and the swift, easy recovery possessed by their models. The Germans, too, were physically the superior of their opponents, and, before any long time had elapsed, their energetic efforts gave them such a lead that, at the boat-house, more than two lengths separated the boats. All the efforts of the Hungarians were in vain and the Germans won quite easily.

Heat 3
Place Boat Bow Rowers Rowers Stroke Cox Time Qual.
1  Berlin (GER) Otto Liebing Max Bröske
Max Vetter
Willi Bartholomae
Fritz Bartholomae
Werner Dehn
Rudolf Reichelt
Hans Matthiae Kurt Runge 6:57.0 QQ
2  Hungária (HUN) István Szebeny Artúr Baján
Miltiades Manno
István Jeney
Lajos Gráf
Miklós Szebeny
Antal Szebeny
György Szebeny Kálmán Vaskó    

Heat 4: 1 p.m. The Norwegian eight, who were considerably heavier and more powerfully built than their English rivals, got away first, and kept the lead for about 150 metres rowing as much as 40 while New College kept to 38 for the first minute. Both crews rowed excellently, with a long swing and a powerful grip of the water, but the recovery of the Norwegians was not so quiet as that of the Englishmen, neither was the finish all that could be desired. These two faults, or rather, the fact that the Norwegian crew had not reached the same degree of perfection as the English, probably had been covered, rowing a quiet effective stroke of about 32 per minute. New College won by two lengths.

Heat 4
Place Boat Bow Rowers Rowers Stroke Cox Time Qual.
1  New College (GBR) William Fison William Parker
Thomas Gillespie
Beaufort Burdekin
Frederick Pitman
Arthur Wiggins
Charles Littlejohn
Robert Bourne John Walker 6:42.5 QQ
2  Christiania (NOR) Einar Sommerfeldt Thomas Høie
Harald Herlofson
Olaf Solberg
Gustav Hæhre
Hannibal Fegth
Gunnar Grantz
Otto Krogh John Bjørnstad    

Heat 5: 1.20 p.m. The Canadians started at 46, while Leander kept to 40, this falling after a minute first to 38 and then to 36, the representatives of the Maple rowing 40–42 during the whole of the race. The two boats kept side by side for a long time, and the pace, in consequence of the terrific time kept up by Canada, was a most amazing one. At the boat-house, Leander spurted and succeeded in creeping half a length in front, but Canada answered with an immensely long, desperate effort and the issue was doubtful until Djurgård Bridge was passed, when Philip Fleming gathered Leander for a final effort which gave the victory to Great Britain by about half a length. Leander rowed in orthodox English style, with a long swing, quiet, finished recovery, a powerful grip of the water and a stroke that was drawn out to the last inch. Canada relied more on muscle, and the tremendous rate at which they rowed prevented a proper recovery. The crew, although beaten, fought like heroes, and lost after the pluckiest struggle imaginable.

Heat 5
Place Boat Bow Rowers Rowers Stroke Cox Time Qual.
1  Leander (GBR) Edgar Burgess Sidney Swann
Leslie Wormald
Ewart Horsfall
James Angus Gillan
Stanley Garton
Alister Kirby
Philip Fleming Henry Wells 6:22.2 QQ
2  Argonaut (CAN) Charles Riddy Phil Boyd
Albert Kent
William Murphy
Alex Sinclair
Becher Gale
Richard Gregory
Geoffrey Taylor Winslow McCleary    

Heat 6: 1.40 p.m. The Swedish boat raced without opponent.

Heat 6
Place Boat Bow Rowers Rowers Stroke Cox Time Qual.
1  Roddklubben af 1912 (SWE) Gustaf Brunkman Per Mattson
Sebastian Tamm
Ted Wachtmeister
Conrad Brunkman
William Bruhn-Möller
Ture Rosvall
Herman Dahlbäck Leo Wilkens 7:05.2 QQ
   
   
   

 

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