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1984  Los Angeles Summer Olympics

1984 Summer Olympics - The Results (Swimming - Women)

Swimming at the 1984 Los Angeles Summer Games

 

Host City: Los Angeles, United States
Date Started: July 29, 1984
Date Finished: August 4, 1984
Events: 29

Participants: 494 (308 men and 185 women) from 67 countries
Youngest Participant: GBR Zara Long (13 years, 271 days)
Oldest Participant: PHI Jairulla Jaitulla (30 years, 244 days)
Most Medals (Athlete): 3 athletes with 4 medals
Most Medals (Country): USA United States (34 medals)

Participating nations

494 swimmers from 67 nations competed.

  •  Argentina (6)
  •  Australia (31)
  •  Austria (6)
  •  Bahamas (2)
  •  Bahrain (2)
  •  Barbados (1)
  •  Belgium (4)
  •  Bermuda (1)
  •  Brazil (7)
  •  Canada (37)
  •  China (14)
  •  Chinese Taipei (5)
  •  Colombia (1)
  •  Costa Rica (1)
  •  Denmark (3)
  •  Egypt (8)
  •  El Salvador (2)
  •  Fiji (3)
  •  Finland (2)
  •  France (16)
  •  Great Britain (33)
  •  Greece (3)
  •  Guatemala (6)
  •  Honduras (6)
  •  Hong Kong (8)
  •  Iceland (4)
  •  Indonesia (1)
  •  Ireland (2)
  •  Israel (3)
  •  Italy (26)
  •  Jamaica (4)
  •  Japan (22)
  •  Kuwait (5)
  •  Lebanon (4)
  •  Malaysia (1)
  •  Mexico (12)
  •  Monaco (1)
  •  Mozambique (2)
  •  Netherlands (16)
  •  Netherlands Antilles (3)
  •  New Zealand (8)
  •  Norway (3)
  •  Panama (1)
  •  Peru (5)
  •  Philippines (4)
  •  Portugal (2)
  •  Puerto Rico (5)
  •  Romania (2)
  •  San Marino (2)
  •  Singapore (4)
  •  South Korea (3)
  •  Spain (8)
  •  Sri Lanka (1)
  •  Suriname (2)
  •  Swaziland (1)
  •  Sweden (24)
  •  Switzerland (13)
  •  Trinidad and Tobago (1)
  •  Tunisia (1)
  •  Turkey (4)
  •  Uganda (1)
  •  United States (43)
  •  Virgin Islands (7)
  •  Uruguay (2)
  •  Venezuela (6)
  •  West Germany (24)
  •  Yugoslavia (3)

Overview

The Soviet-led Eastern Bloc boycott allowed the United States to dominate the 1984 swimming events, especially on the women'€™s side, with the absence of the East German (German Democratic Republic) women. On the men'€™s side, the biggest loss was not seeing Soviet distance star [Vladimir Salnikov].

The swimming venue was specially built for the Los Angeles Olympics and was one of only two venues that had to be built from scratch for the 1984 Olympics, the other being the cycling velodrome. The Olympic Swim Stadium was built with donations from McDonald'€™s and after the Olympics was called the McDonald'€™s Olympic Swim Stadium, and became the home swim stadium for the University of Southern California (USC). The stadium was closed in 2013 and renovated, and was then renamed the Uytengsu Aquatics Center, after a USC alumnus. The 1984 swim stadium was an outdoor venue, which was the first time since 1960 that Olympic swimming was contested outdoors. After the Los Angeles Olympics this also occurred at Barcelona in 1992, but through 2012, all Olympic swimming competition has been outdoors (except for the long-distance swims added in 2008).

The programs were returned to their status of 1968 and 1972, with 15 men'€™s events and 14 women'€™s events. The 200 individual medley was restored for both genders, and the men had the 4x100 freestyle relay added back to the program.

One major change had occurred in the program. Because of the United States winning so many medals, often sweeping the medals in events, and the GDR women now doing the same, nations could no longer enter three swimmers in the individual events, but were now limited to only two in each individual event.

The United States won 21 of 29 events and 34 of 87 medals, easily leading both lists. On the men'€™s side they won 9 golds and 15 medals, while their women won 12 golds and 19 medals. Seven American swimmers won three gold medals, as follows '€“ [Nancy Hogshead], [Mike Heath], [Tracy Caulkins], [Mary T. Meagher], [Carrie Steinseifer], [Rick Carey], and [Rowdy Gaines]. Three swimmers won four medals '€“ Hogshead, Heath, and West Germany [Michael Groß].

Swimming at the 1984 Summer Olympics, held at the McDonald's Olympic Swim Stadium, located on the USC campus. There was a total of 494 participants from 67 countries competing.

This was the first Olympic games at which only two swimmers per country, per event, were permitted. Previously, three swimmers were allowed and many countries would sweep the medal stand.

 
  

Medal table (both men & women)

 
RankNationGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1  United States (USA) 21 13 0 34
2  Canada (CAN) 4 3 3 10
3  West Germany (FRG) 2 3 6 11
4  Netherlands (NED) 2 1 3 6
5  Australia (AUS) 1 5 6 12
6  Great Britain (GBR) 0 1 4 5
7  France (FRA) 0 1 1 2
8  Brazil (BRA) 0 1 0 1
9  Sweden (SWE) 0 0 2 2
10  Belgium (BEL) 0 0 1 1
 Romania (ROM) 0 0 1 1
 Switzerland (SUI) 0 0 1 1
 Venezuela (VEN) 0 0 1 1
Totals (13 nations) 30 28 29 87

Medal summary

Women's events

EventGoldSilverBronze
100 m freestyle Carrie Steinseifer
 United States
55.92 none awarded   Annemarie Verstappen
 Netherlands
56.08
Nancy Hogshead
 United States
200 m freestyle Mary Wayte
 United States
1:59.23 Cynthia Woodhead
 United States
1:59.50 Annemarie Verstappen
 Netherlands
1:59.69
400 m freestyle Tiffany Cohen
 United States
4:07.10 OR Sarah Hardcastle
 Great Britain
4:10.29 June Croft
 Great Britain
4:11.49
800 m freestyle Tiffany Cohen
 United States
8:24.95 OR Michele Richardson
 United States
8:30.73 Sarah Hardcastle
 Great Britain
8:32.60
100 m backstroke Theresa Andrews
 United States
1:02.55 Betsy Mitchell
 United States
1:02.63 Jolanda de Rover
 Netherlands
1:02.91
200 m backstroke Jolanda de Rover
 Netherlands
2:12.38 Amy White
 United States
2:13.04 Anca Patrascoiu
 Romania
2:13.29
100 m breaststroke Petra van Staveren
 Netherlands
1:09.88 OR Anne Ottenbrite
 Canada
1:10.69 Catherine Poirot
 France
1:10.70
200 m breaststroke Anne Ottenbrite
 Canada
2:30.38 Susan Rapp
 United States
2:31.15 Ingrid Lempereur
 Belgium
2:31.40
100 m butterfly Mary T. Meagher
 United States
59.26 Jenna Johnson
 United States
1:00.19 Karin Seick
 West Germany
1:01.36
200 m butterfly Mary T. Meagher
 United States
2:06.90 OR Karen Phillips
 Australia
2:10.56 Ina Beyermann
 West Germany
2:11.91
200 m individual medley Tracy Caulkins
 United States
2:12.64 OR Nancy Hogshead
 United States
2:15.17 Michelle Pearson
 Australia
2:15.92
400 m individual medley Tracy Caulkins
 United States
4:39.24 Suzanne Landells
 Australia
4:48.30 Petra Zindler
 West Germany
4:48.57
4×100 m freestyle relay  United States (USA)
Jenna Johnson
Carrie Steinseifer
Dara Torres
Nancy Hogshead
Jill Sterkel*
Mary Wayte*
3:43.43  Netherlands (NED)
Annemarie Verstappen
Desi Reijers
Elles Voskes
Conny van Bentum
Wilma van Velsen*
3:44.40  West Germany (FRG)
Iris Zscherpe
Susanne Schuster
Christiane Pielke
Karin Seick
3:45.56
4×100 m medley relay  United States (USA)
Theresa Andrews
Tracy Caulkins
Mary T. Meagher
Nancy Hogshead
Betsy Mitchell*
Susan Rapp*
Jenna Johnson*
Carrie Steinseifer*
4:08.34  West Germany (FRG)
Svenja Schlicht
Ute Hasse
Ina Beyermann
Karin Seick
4:11.97  Canada (CAN)
Reema Abdo
Anne Ottenbrite
Michelle MacPherson
Pamela Rai
4:12.98

*Swimmers who participated in the heats only and received medals.

 

Women's 100 metres Freestyle

 Host City: Los Angeles, United States
Venue(s): Olympic Swim Stadium, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California
Date Started: July 29, 1984
Date Finished: July 29, 1984

Competitors 45from 30 nations

Summary

This was the first final of the 1984 Olympic swimming program and it was greatly affected by the results of the men's 400 individual medley at the 1972 Olympics. In that event, Sweden's [Gunnar Larsson] and American [Tim McKee] seemingly tied in 4:31.98, but the electronic timer broke that tie, giving the Swede the gold by a margin of 2/1000ths of a second. It was decided after that race, that this was too close, as the margin could be affected by irregularities in the paint on a lane, so all swimming races since 1972 that were tied to the 1/100th would be considered ties.

The early leader in the final of this race was Dutchwoman [Annemarie Verstappen], who was ahead at the turn. In the final 50 metres the Americans [Carrie Steinseifer] and [Nancy Hogshead] passed her and came to the wall together, literally together. They both finished in 55.92, although the scoreboard initially showed Steinseifer as the winner, but that was quickly changed to a tie for first between Steinseifer and Hogshead.

 The final of the women's 100 metre freestyle event at the 1984 Summer Olympics was held in the McDonald's Olympic Swim Stadium in Los Angeles, California, on July 29, 1984. The eight fastest times qualified for the final, the next eight for the B-final.
 

Records

Prior to this competition, the existing world and Olympic records were as follows.

World record  Barbara Krause (GDR) 54.79 Moscow, Soviet Union 21 July 1980
Olympic record  Barbara Krause (GDR) 54.79 Moscow, Soviet Union 21 July 1980
 

Final A

RankLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
1st, gold medalist(s) 4 Nancy Hogshead  United States 55.92  
3 Carrie Steinseifer  United States  
3rd, bronze medalist(s) 5 Annemarie Verstappen  Netherlands 56.08  
4 7 Conny van Bentum  Netherlands 56.43  
5 6 Michelle Pearson  Australia 56.83  
6 2 Susanne Schuster  West Germany 56.90  
7 1 June Croft  Great Britain 57.11  
8 8 Angela Russell  Australia 58.09  
 

Final B

RankLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
9 4 Iris Zscherpe  West Germany 57.19  
10 6 Silvia Persi  Italy 57.24  
11 2 Nicola Fibbens  Great Britain 57.36  
12 5 Pamela Rai  Canada 57.56  
13 3 Sophie Kamoun  France 57.81  
14 8 Jane Kerr  Canada 57.85  
15 1 Agneta Eriksson  Sweden 58.08  
16 7 Maria Kardum  Sweden 58.12  

Heats

Rule: The eight fastest swimmers advance to final A (Q), while the next eight to final B (q).

RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
9 1 5 Iris Zscherpe  West Germany 57.31 q
11 1 3 Sophie Kamoun  France 57.49 q
17 1 4 Kaori Yanase  Japan 58.47  
25 1 6 Teresa Rivera  Mexico 59.61  
35 1 2 Faten Ghattas  Tunisia 1:02.00  
39 1 7 Anna Doig  New Zealand 1:02.72  
43 1 1 Sharon Pickering  Fiji 1:04.25  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
2 2 4 Annemarie Verstappen  Netherlands 56.11 Q
12 2 3 Silvia Persi  Italy 57.62 q
16 2 5 Jane Kerr  Canada 58.46 q
23 2 6 Sofia Dara  Greece 59.25  
28 2 2 Carmel Clark  New Zealand 1:00.63  
32 2 7 Kathy Wong  Hong Kong 1:01.03  
37 2 1 Blanca Morales  Guatemala 1:02.48  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
3 3 4 Carrie Steinseifer  United States 56.46 Q
5 3 5 Susanne Schuster  West Germany 56.85 Q
18 3 3 Maarit Vähäsaari-Sihvonen  Finland 58.51  
19 3 6 Marie-Thérèse Armentero  Switzerland 58.73  
22 3 7 Ding Jilian  China 59.11  
34 3 2 Fenella Ng  Hong Kong 1:01.82  
42 3 1 Nevine Hafez  Egypt 1:04.06  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
4 4 3 Michelle Pearson  Australia 56.75 Q, OC
6 4 4 Conny van Bentum  Netherlands 56.94 Q
10 4 5 Pamela Rai  Canada 57.41 q
20 4 6 Patricia Kohlmann  Mexico 58.76  
30 4 7 Kim Jin-suk  South Korea 1:00.91  
31 4 2 Sandra Crousse  Peru 1:01.02  
40 4 1 Sherwite Hafez  Egypt 1:02.78  
45 4 8 María Lardizábal  Honduras 1:07.80  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
7 5 4 June Croft  Great Britain 57.12 Q
13 5 5 Nicola Fibbens  Great Britain 57.80 q
14 5 3 Maria Kardum  Sweden 58.22 q
21 5 6 Chikako Nakamori  Japan 59.00  
29 5 2 Shelley Cramer  Virgin Islands 1:00.65  
33 5 7 Carol Ann Heavey  Ireland 1:01.34  
36 5 1 Christine Jacob  Philippines 1:02.43  
41 5 8 Karen Slowing-Aceituno  Guatemala 1:03.46  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
1 6 4 Nancy Hogshead  United States 55.85 Q
8 6 5 Angela Russell  Australia 57.30 Q
15 6 3 Agneta Eriksson  Sweden 58.43 q
24 6 2 Grazia Colombo  Italy 59.43  
26 6 7 Yan Hong  China 1:00.45  
27 6 6 Virginia Sachero  Argentina 1:00.53  
38 6 1 Helen Chow  Malaysia 1:02.53  
44 6 8 Daniela Galassi  San Marino 1:06.19  
 

Women's 200 metres Freestyle

 Host City: Los Angeles, United States
Venue(s): Olympic Swim Stadium, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California
Date Started: July 30, 1984
Date Finished: July 30, 1984

Competitors 38from 26 nations

Summary

At the beginning of 1984 the world record was held by American [Sippy Woodhead], who had set three world marks back in 1978-79. She had been World Swimmer of the Year in 1979 and was crushed by not being able to compete in Moscow. Now an ancient 20-year-old, for a world-class swimmer in that era, Woodhead was nowhere near the swimmer she had been in the late 70s, but she made the US team. Just prior to the Los Angeles, her world record was broken by [Kristin Otto] at the East German trials, who could not be there because of the Soviet-led boycott. Woodhead had won the US Trials, leading home [Mary Wayte], but in Los Angeles Wayte was the one winning, coming to the wall in 1:59.23, with Woodhead taking silver. Woodhead'€™s time of 1:59.50 was her best in three years. A few weeks later Otto won this event at the Friendship Games, but her time was a surprisingly slow 1:59.48.

 The final of the women's 200 metre freestyle event at the 1984 Summer Olympics was held in the McDonald's Olympic Swim Stadium in Los Angeles, California, on July 30, 1984. The fastest eight qualified for the final, the next eight for the B-final.
 

Records

Prior to this competition, the existing world and Olympic records were as follows.

World record  Kristin Otto (GDR) 1:57.75 Magdeburg, East Germany 23 May 1984
Olympic record  Barbara Krause (GDR) 1:58.33 Moscow, Soviet Union 24 July 1980
 

Final A

RankLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
1st, gold medalist(s) 4 Mary Wayte  United States 1:59.23  
2nd, silver medalist(s) 5 Cynthia Woodhead  United States 1:59.50  
3rd, bronze medalist(s) 7 Annemarie Verstappen  Netherlands 1:59.69  
4 6 Michelle Pearson  Australia 1:59.79 OC
5 2 Conny van Bentum  Netherlands 2:00.59  
6 3 June Croft  Great Britain 2:00.64  
7 1 Ina Beyermann  West Germany 2:01.89  
8 8 Anna McVann  Australia 2:02.87  
 

Final B

RankLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
9 6 Silvia Persi  Italy 2:03.17 NR
10 3 Iris Zscherpe  West Germany 2:03.42  
11 4 Julie Daigneault  Canada 2:03.67  
12 8 Ann Linder  Sweden 2:03.85  
13 5 Chikako Nakamori  Japan 2:04.11  
14 2 Jane Kerr  Canada 2:04.19  
15 1 Annabelle Cripps  Great Britain 2:04.90  
16 7 Kaori Yanase  Japan 2:05.24  
 

Heats

Rule: The eight fastest swimmers advance to final A (Q), while the next eight to final B (q).

RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
6 1 4 Annemarie Verstappen  Netherlands 2:01.61 Q
16 1 5 Ann Linder  Sweden 2:04.60 q
19 1 3 Laurence Bensimon  France 2:06.61  
23 1 6 Sofia Dara  Greece 2:09.52  
29 1 7 Kim Jin-suk  South Korea 2:13.76  
30 1 2 Fenella Ng  Hong Kong 2:13.94  
34 1 1 Daniela Galassi  San Marino 2:19.22  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
5 2 4 Conny van Bentum  Netherlands 2:01.52 Q
12 2 3 Silvia Persi  Italy 2:03.98 q
15 2 5 Annabelle Cripps  Great Britain 2:04.44 q
17 2 6 Carla Lasi  Italy 2:05.86  
18 2 7 Lisa Ann Wen  Chinese Taipei 2:06.01  
20 2 2 Carol Ann Heavey  Ireland 2:07.75  
31 2 1 Karen Slowing-Aceituno  Guatemala 2:14.39  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
1 3 4 Mary Wayte  United States 2:00.69 Q
4 3 5 Michelle Pearson  Australia 2:01.49 Q
8 3 3 Anna McVann  Australia 2:03.14 Q
11 3 6 Iris Zscherpe  West Germany 2:03.95 q
26 3 7 Hadar Rubinstein  Israel 2:12.32  
27 3 2 Virginia Sachero  Argentina 2:13.41  
33 3 1 Sherwite Hafez  Egypt 2:16.11  
36 3 8 María Lardizábal  Honduras 2:28.65  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
2 4 4 Cynthia Woodhead  United States 2:00.85 Q
10 4 6 Chikako Nakamori  Japan 2:03.94 q
13 4 3 Jane Kerr  Canada 2:04.02 q
14 4 5 Kaori Yanase  Japan 2:04.38 q
24 4 2 Irma Huerta  Mexico 2:09.79  
25 4 1 Christine Jacob  Philippines 2:12.17  
32 4 8 Blanca Morales  Guatemala 2:14.79  
  4 7 Faten Ghattas  Tunisia DNS  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
3 5 4 June Croft  Great Britain 2:01.05 Q
7 5 5 Ina Beyermann  West Germany 2:02.42 Q
9 5 3 Julie Daigneault  Canada 2:03.40 q
21 5 2 Patricia Kohlmann  Mexico 2:08.15  
22 5 7 Sandra Crousse  Peru 2:09.42  
28 5 1 Chang Hui-chien  Chinese Taipei 2:13.67  
35 5 8 Sharon Pickering  Fiji 2:19.61  
  5 6 Maria Kardum  Sweden DNS  
 

Women's 400 metres Freestyle

 Host City: Los Angeles, United States
Venue(s): Olympic Swim Stadium, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California
Date Started: July 31, 1984
Date Finished: July 31, 1984

Competitors 26from 18 nations

Summary

The East Germans had been 1-2 in this event at the 1982 World Championships, after sweeping the medals in Moscow. The 1982 World bronze medalist was American [Tiffany Cohen], who became the de facto favorite because of the Eastern Bloc boycott. The world record holder was Australian [Tracey Wickham], but the mark was from 1978 and she had briefly retired in 1979, and although she returned in 1982, she was not in Los Angeles. In the final Cohen dominated, going ahead of Wickham'€™s world record splits through 300 metres, and leading by almost four seconds. But she could not quiet hang on for the record, finishing in an Olympic record of 4:07.10, the second fastest women'€™s 400 ever, less than a second above Wickham'€™s mark. Three days later Cohen would add another gold by winning the 800 freestyle.

Great Britain surprisingly supplied the silver and bronze medalists, [Sarah Hardcastle] and [June Croft]. Hardcastle won a bronze medal in this event at the 1986 Worlds, and then retired, only to return in 1993, win the 1995 World Short-Course 800 freestyle, and compete again at the 1996 Olympics. Croft had won the 100 and 200 freestyles at the 1982 Commonwealth Games and also came back much later, winning relay medals at the 1990 Commonwealth Games. The fourth-place finisher was [Kim Linehan] who had been expected to medal, coming into Los Angeles with the second-fastest time of the year, after Cohen. Linehan had been 1982 World Champion in the 800 free, and then retired, only to return late in 1983 in an effort to compete and win an Olympic medal.

 The final of the women's 400 metre freestyle event at the 1984 Summer Olympics was held in the McDonald's Olympic Swim Stadium in Los Angeles, California, on July 31, 1984. The fastest eight qualified for the final, the next eight for the B-final.
 

Records

Prior to this competition, the existing world and Olympic records were as follows.

World record  Tracey Wickham (AUS) 4:06.28 West Berlin 24 August 1978
Olympic record  Ines Diers (GDR) 4:08.76 Moscow, Soviet Union 22 July 1980

The following records were established during the competition:

DateRoundNameNationTimeRecord
31 July Final A Tiffany Cohen  United States 4:07.10 OR
 

Final A

RankLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
1st, gold medalist(s) 4 Tiffany Cohen  United States 4:07.10 OR
2nd, silver medalist(s) 5 Sarah Hardcastle  Great Britain 4:10.27 NR
3rd, bronze medalist(s) 2 June Croft  Great Britain 4:11.49  
4 3 Kim Linehan  United States 4:12.26  
5 6 Anna McVann  Australia 4:13.95  
6 1 Jolande van der Meer  Netherlands 4:16.05  
7 8 Birgit Kowalczik  West Germany 4:16.33  
8 7 Julie Daigneault  Canada 4:16.41  

Final B

RankLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
9 7 Susie Baumer  Australia 4:15.46  
10 6 Donna McGinnis  Canada 4:15.59  
11 4 Ann Linder  Sweden 4:17.55  
12 3 Carla Lasi  Italy 4:18.57  
13 5 Monica Olmi  Italy 4:19.22  
14 2 Chikako Nakamori  Japan 4:20.18  
15 1 Lisa Ann Wen  Chinese Taipei 4:21.61  
16 8 Irma Huerta  Mexico 4:23.34  

Heats

Rule: The eight fastest swimmers advance to final A (Q), while the next eight to final B (q).

RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
10 1 6 Monica Olmi  Italy 4:18.70 q
11 1 5 Carla Lasi  Italy 4:18.90 q
12 1 4 Ina Beyermann  West Germany 4:18.94 q, WD
20 1 3 Sofia Dara  Greece 4:31.76  
21 1 2 Hadar Rubinstein  Israel 4:34.95  
24 1 7 Chang Hui-chien  Chinese Taipei 4:42.47  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
5 2 4 June Croft  Great Britain 4:15.51 Q
6 2 3 Julie Daigneault  Canada 4:16.60 Q
7 2 5 Jolande van der Meer  Netherlands 4:16.65 Q
17 2 2 Irma Huerta  Mexico 4:25.13 q
19 2 6 Junko Sakurai  Japan 4:28.68  
  2 7 Faten Ghattas  Tunisia DNS  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
3 3 4 Kim Linehan  United States 4:15.08 Q
4 3 3 Anna McVann  Australia 4:15.21 Q
9 3 6 Ann Linder  Sweden 4:18.28 q
15 3 5 Susie Baumer  Australia 4:20.69 q
16 3 7 Lisa Ann Wen  Chinese Taipei 4:23.30 q
18 3 2 Nadia Krüger  Switzerland 4:28.20  
23 3 1 Karen Slowing-Aceituno  Guatemala 4:36.87  
 
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
1 4 4 Tiffany Cohen  United States 4:11.49 Q
2 4 5 Sarah Hardcastle  Great Britain 4:11.55 Q, NR
8 4 3 Birgit Kowalczik  West Germany 4:17.92 Q
13 4 6 Donna McGinnis  Canada 4:19.48 q
14 4 2 Chikako Nakamori  Japan 4:20.13 q, NR
22 4 1 Carol Ann Heavey  Ireland 4:36.07  
25 4 7 Fenella Ng  Hong Kong 4:43.41  
 

Women's 800 metres Freestyle

 Host City: Los Angeles, United States
Venue(s): Olympic Swim Stadium, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California
Date Started: August 2, 1984
Date Finished: August 3, 1984

Competitors 23from 16 nations

Summary

The world record in this event was the oldest one on the books, set in August 1978 by Australian [Tracey Wickham] at the Commonwealth Games. Wickham was now retired and the favorite in Los Angeles was [Tiffany Cohen], who had already won a gold medal in the 400 free. The 1982 World Champion was American [Kim Linehan], who had made the 1984 US Olympic team, but not in this event. Cohen was never challenged in winning the gold medal, finishing in 8:24.95, almost six seconds of her teammate [Michelle Richardson]. Cohen's time was the third fastest ever, trailing Wickham's world record of 8:24.62 and Linehan's American record of 8:24.70, set in 1979 at the US Nationals. The bronze medal went to Britain's [Sarah Hardcastle], who had already won a silver in the 400 free in Los Angeles. In 1986 Hardcastle would win the 400 and 800 free at the Commonwealth Games and then retire, only to return in 1993 and win the 1995 World Short-Course 800 freestyle, and compete again at the 1996 Olympics, where she made the final of this event.

 The final of the women's 800 metre freestyle event at the 1984 Summer Olympics was held at the McDonald's Olympic Swim Stadium in Los Angeles, California, on August 3, 1984. The fastest eight qualified for the final.
 

Records

Prior to this competition, the existing world and Olympic records were as follows.

World record  Tracey Wickham (AUS) 8:24.62 Edmonton, Canada 5 August 1978
Olympic record  Michelle Ford (AUS) 8:28.90 Moscow, Soviet Union 26 July 1980

The following records were established during the competition:

DateRoundNameNationTimeRecord
3 August Final A Tiffany Cohen  United States 8:24.96 OR
 

Final

RankLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
1st, gold medalist(s) 2 Tiffany Cohen  United States 8:24.96 OR
2nd, silver medalist(s) 4 Michele Richardson  United States 8:30.73  
3rd, bronze medalist(s) 3 Sarah Hardcastle  Great Britain 8:32.60 NR
4 5 Anna McVann  Australia 8:37.94  
5 6 Carla Lasi  Italy 8:42.45  
6 8 Jolande van der Meer  Netherlands 8:42.86  
7 1 Monica Olmi  Italy 8:47.32  
8 7 Karen Ward  Canada 8:48.12  

Heats

Rule: The eight fastest swimmers advance to final A (Q).

RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
3 1 4 Sarah Hardcastle  Great Britain 8:35.87 Q
4 1 5 Carla Lasi  Italy 8:41.84 Q, NR
11 1 6 Birgit Kowalczik  West Germany 8:53.34  
14 1 3 Annabelle Cripps  Great Britain 8:58.09  
16 1 7 Nadia Krüger  Switzerland 9:07.95  
20 1 1 Chang Hui-chien  Chinese Taipei 9:34.93  
  1 2 Sofia Dara  Greece DNS  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
1 2 4 Michele Richardson  United States 8:32.64 Q
2 2 5 Anna McVann  Australia 8:35.19 Q
7 2 2 Monica Olmi  Italy 8:45.83 Q
10 2 6 Donna McGinnis  Canada 8:51.71  
15 2 3 Laurence Bensimon  France 9:01.75  
18 2 7 Junko Sakurai  Japan 9:13.27  
19 2 8 Karen Slowing-Aceituno  Guatemala 9:20.68  
  2 1 Hadar Rubinstein  Israel DNS  
 
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
5 3 4 Tiffany Cohen  United States 8:41.86 Q
6 3 6 Karen Ward  Canada 8:45.37 Q
8 3 5 Jolande van der Meer  Netherlands 8:46.58 Q
9 3 2 Ann Linder  Sweden 8:50.80  
12 3 1 Irma Huerta  Mexico 8:56.18  
13 3 3 Susie Baumer  Australia 8:56.40  
17 3 7 Lisa Ann Wen  Chinese Taipei 9:09.73  
  3 8 Rosa Fuentes  Mexico DNS  
 

Women's 4 x— 100 metres Freestyle Relay

 Host City: Los Angeles, United States
Venue(s): Olympic Swim Stadium, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California
Date Started: July 31, 1984
Date Finished: July 31, 1984

Competitors 54from 12 nations

 

Summary

With the East German women absent because of the Soviet-led boycott, the USA women became the overwhelming favorites in the freestyle relay. In the heats the US qualified first although it saved the co-gold medalists from the 100 freestyle, [Nancy Hogshead] and [Carrie Steinseifer], for the final. They were joined by [Dara Torres] and [Jenna Johnson]. On the opening leg the Dutch team led, with [Annemarie Verstappen] touching in 55.94 to put them ahead. Steinseifer put the American ahead on the second leg, but it was still close and it would stay that way throughout. After three legs it was almost a dead heat, with the US 0.08 seconds ahead as [Nancy Hogshead] and [Conny van Bentum] took to the water. By the final turn van Bentum had closed the gap, but the effort cost her as Hogshead pulled away on the final lap to give the US the gold medal over the Netherlands, winning by almost a second. The American time of 3:43.43 was a US record, but missed the East German world and Olympic record of 3:42.71. Three weeks later the GDR women would better that mark with 3:42.41 at the Friendship Games in Moscow.

The final of the women's 4 × 100 metre freestyle relay event at the 1984 Summer Olympics was held in Los Angeles, California, on July 31, 1984.

 

Records

Prior to this competition, the existing world and Olympic records were as follows.

World record  East Germany (GDR)
Barbara Krause (54.90)
Caren Metschuck (55.61)
Ines Diers (55.90)
Sarina Hülsenbeck (56.30)
3:42.71 Moscow, Soviet Union 27 July 1980
Olympic record  East Germany (GDR)
Barbara Krause (54.90)
Caren Metschuck (55.61)
Ines Diers (55.90)
Sarina Hülsenbeck (56.30)
3:42.71 Moscow, Soviet Union 27 July 1980
 

Final

RankLaneNationSwimmersTimeNotes
1st, gold medalist(s) 4  United States Jenna Johnson (56.46)
Carrie Steinseifer (55.87)
Dara Torres (55.92)
Nancy Hogshead (55.18)
3:43.43 AM
2nd, silver medalist(s) 3  Netherlands Annemarie Verstappen (55.94)
Elles Voskes (56.77)
Desi Reijers (55.62)
Conny van Bentum (56.07)
3:44.40 NR
3rd, bronze medalist(s) 5  West Germany Iris Zscherpe (57.26)
Susanne Schuster (56.32)
Christiane Pielke (56.24)
Karin Seick (55.74)
3:45.56 NR
4 6  Australia Michelle Pearson (56.51)
Angela Russell (56.97)
Anna McVann (58.26)
Lisa Curry (56.05)
3:47.79 OC
5 2  Canada Pamela Rai (57.70)
Carol Klimpel (57.47)
Cheryl McArton (57.52)
Jane Kerr (56.81)
3:49.50  
6 7  Great Britain June Croft (57.49)
Nicola Fibbens (57.33)
Debra Gore (57.24)
Annabelle Cripps (58.06)
3:50.12 NR
7 1  Sweden Maria Kardum (57.93)
Agneta Eriksson (57.19)
Petra Hildér (57.90)
Karin Furuhed (58.22)
3:51.24  
8 8  France Carole Amoric (58.58)
Sophie Kamoun (57.24)
Véronique Jardin (57.83)
Laurence Bensimon (58.50)
3:52.15 NR
 

Heats

Rule: The eight fastest teams advance to the final (Q).

 
RankHeatLaneNationSwimmersTimeNotes
2 1 4  West Germany Iris Zscherpe (57.04)
Susanne Schuster (56.50)
Christiane Pielke (56.90)
Karin Seick (56.05)
3:46.49 Q, NR
4 1 6  Australia Lisa Curry (57.79)
Angela Russell (57.11)
Janet Tibbits (58.16)
Michelle Pearson (56.55)
3:49.61 Q
7 1 5  Sweden Maria Kardum (58.32)
Agneta Eriksson (56.92)
Petra Hildér (58.18)
Malin Rundgren (58.85)
3:52.27 Q
8 1 3  France Sophie Kamoun (58.40)
Carole Amoric (57.74)
Laurence Bensimon (58.74)
Véronique Jardin (57.79)
3:52.67 Q
11 1 2  Mexico Patricia Kohlmann (58.58)
Teresa Rivera (59.01)
Rosa Fuentes (1:00.80)
Irma Huerta (59.92)
3:58.31  
12 1 7  Hong Kong Kathy Wong (1:00.67)
Fenella Ng (1:02.51)
Lotta Flink (1:03.61)
Chow Lai Yee (1:05.84)
4:12.53  
RankHeatLaneNationSwimmersTimeNotes
1 2 4  United States Dara Torres (56.88)
Jill Sterkel (55.42)
Jenna Johnson (55.63)
Mary Wayte (55.63)
3:43.56 Q, AM
3 2 5  Netherlands Annemarie Verstappen (56.30)
Elles Voskes (56.98)
Desi Reijers (56.08)
Wilma van Velsen (57.57)
3:47.65 Q
5 2 3  Canada Jane Kerr (57.82)
Maureen New (57.60)
Cheryl McArton (57.48)
Carol Klimpel (57.44)
3:50.40 Q
6 2 6  Great Britain Annabelle Cripps (57.82)
Nicola Fibbens (57.60)
Debra Gore (57.48)
June Croft (57.44)
3:51.47 Q
9 2 7  Italy Monica Olmi (59.02)
Silvia Persi (57.02)
Grazia Colombo (58.40)
Manuela Dalla Valle (58.45)
3:52.89 NR
10 2 2  Japan Junko Sakurai (59.18)
Chikako Nakamori (58.15)
Miki Saito (58.98)
Kaori Yanase (58.37)
3:54.68  
 

Women's 100 metres Backstroke

Host City: Los Angeles, United States
Venue(s): Olympic Swim Stadium, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California
Date Started: July 31, 1984
Date Finished: July 31, 1984 

 Competitors 32from 22 nations

 

Summary

The East Germans had been dominant in this event since the 1973 World Championships, with the world record still the mark set by [Rica Reinisch] to win the 1980 Olympics, 1:00.86. Since Moscow, the best American swimmer had been Sue Walsh of the University of North Carolina, the 1983 Pan American champion, but her best years were behind her and she missed the American team at the Trials. The two Americans in the race were [Betsy Mitchell], who won the Trials, and [Theresa Andrews], who had not been expected to make the team. The Olympic final was led out by Dutchwoman [Jolanda de Rover], who was caught at the turn by Romanian [Carmen Bunaciu]. At 75 metres, Bunaciu had fallen back as the two Americans gained on de Rover. The three touched almost together with Andrews winning gold in 1:02.55, followed by Mitchell in 1:02.63, and de Rover for the bronze in 1:02.91. At the Friendship Games, 24 days later, East German [Ina Kleber] finally broke Reinisch's world record, finishing in 1:00.59, a mark that would stand until 1991.

The final of the women's 100 metre backstroke event at the 1984 Summer Olympics was held in the McDonald's Olympic Swim Stadium in Los Angeles, California, on July 31, 1984. The fastest eight qualified for the final, the next eight for the B-final.

 

Records

Prior to this competition, the existing world and Olympic records were as follows.

World record  Rica Reinisch (GDR) 1:00.86 Moscow, Soviet Union 23 July 1980
Olympic record  Rica Reinisch (GDR) 1:00.86 Moscow, Soviet Union 23 July 1980
 

Final A

RankLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
1st, gold medalist(s) 3 Theresa Andrews  United States 1:02.55  
2nd, silver medalist(s) 4 Betsy Mitchell  United States 1:02.63  
3rd, bronze medalist(s) 5 Jolanda de Rover  Netherlands 1:02.91  
4 2 Carmen Bunaciu  Romania 1:03.21  
5 1 Anca Pătrășcoiu  Romania 1:03.29  
6 7 Svenja Schlicht  West Germany 1:03.46 NR
7 6 Beverley Rose  Great Britain 1:04.16  
8 8 Carmel Clark  New Zealand 1:04.47  
 

Final B

RankLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
9 2 Audrey Moore  Australia 1:04.15  
10 5 Manuela Carosi  Italy 1:04.52  
3 Georgina Parkes  Australia  
12 4 Brigitte van der Lans  Netherlands 1:04.75  
13 7 Catherine White  Great Britain 1:04.99  
14 6 Reema Abdo  Canada 1:05.13  
15 1 Sabine Pauwels  Belgium 1:05.33  
16 8 Eva Gysling  Switzerland 1:06.11  
 

Heats

Rule: The eight fastest swimmers advance to final A (Q), while the next eight to final B (q).

RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
2 1 4 Theresa Andrews  United States 1:02.94 Q
8 1 3 Brigitte van der Lans  Netherlands 1:04.57 QSO
13 1 5 Audrey Moore  Australia 1:04.96 q
14 1 6 Catherine White  Great Britain 1:05.03 q
18 1 7 Naomi Sekido  Japan 1:05.60  
19 1 2 Michelle MacPherson  Canada 1:06.04  
26 1 1 Lotta Flink  Hong Kong 1:09.70  
29 1 8 Sharon Pickering  Fiji 1:10.49  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
1 2 4 Betsy Mitchell  United States 1:02.53 Q
6 2 5 Svenja Schlicht  West Germany 1:04.02 Q
8 2 5 Carmel Clark  New Zealand 1:04.57 QSO
10 2 3 Manuela Carosi  Italy 1:04.77 q
22 2 6 Yolande van der Straeten  Belgium 1:07.07  
24 2 7 Choi Yun-hui  South Korea 1:07.35  
28 2 8 Christine Jacob  Philippines 1:10.28  
30 2 1 Petra Bekaert  Netherlands Antilles 1:10.60  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
7 3 4 Anca Pătrășcoiu  Romania 1:04.16 Q
11 3 5 Georgina Parkes  Australia 1:04.90 q
12 3 3 Reema Abdo  Canada 1:04.92 q
16 3 6 Eva Gysling  Switzerland 1:05.18 q
17 3 2 Sandra Dahlmann  West Germany 1:05.27  
23 3 7 Nozomi Sunouchi  Japan 1:07.23  
25 3 1 Guo Huaying  China 1:08.21  
31 3 8 Helen Chow  Malaysia 1:11.30  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
2 4 5 Jolanda de Rover  Netherlands 1:02.94 Q
4 4 2 Beverley Rose  Great Britain 1:03.61 Q, NR
5 4 4 Carmen Bunaciu  Romania 1:03.79 Q
15 4 7 Sabine Pauwels  Belgium 1:05.17 q
20 4 6 Anna-Karin Eriksson  Sweden 1:06.09  
21 4 3 Teresa Rivera  Mexico 1:06.39  
27 4 8 Kathy Wong  Hong Kong 1:10.19  
  4 1 Lise Lotte Nylund  Norway DNS  

Swimoff

RankLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
1 5 Carmel Clark  New Zealand 1:04.33 Q, NR
2 4 Brigitte van der Lans  Netherlands 1:04.82 q
 

Women's 200 metres Backstroke

 Host City: Los Angeles, United States
Venue(s): Olympic Swim Stadium, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California
Date Started: August 4, 1984
Date Finished: August 4, 1984

 Competitors 29from 19 nations

 

Summary

This was the final individual event of the 1984 Olympic swimming program. It was won by the Netherlands'€™ [Jolanda de Rover], who had been a silver medalist at the 1981 European Championships, with a personal best of 2:15.22. But she did not improve on that mark in 1982-83, finishing eighth at the 1982 Worlds, and seventh at the 1983 Europeans. At the 1984 Dutch Olympic Trials, she set a new national record with 2:13.90, and improved that in Los Angeles in the prelims, qualifying first in 2:13.50. By the time of this race, she had already won bronze in LA in the 100 back. In the final she set a blistering pace, going out in 30.85 and 1:04.48 to lead Romania'€™s [Aneta Pătrășcoiu] by ½-a-second at mid-race. De Rover slowed in the next 50, but still led as American [Amy White] challenged the leaders, and she hung on to win gold in 2:12.38, with White taking silver and Pătrășcoiu the bronze. White had been 1983 Pan American champion in this event when she was only 14-years-old. De Rover'€™s time made her the eighth fastest performer of all-time. Pătrășcoiu won the first-ever Olympic swimming medal for Romania.

The final of the women's 200 metre backstroke event at the 1984 Summer Olympics was held in the McDonald's Olympic Swim Stadium in Los Angeles, California, on August 4, 1984. The fastest eight qualified for the final, the next eight for the B-final.

 

Records

Prior to this competition, the existing world and Olympic records were as follows.

World record  Cornelia Sirch (GDR) 2:09.91 Guayaquil, Ecuador 8 August 1982
Olympic record  Rica Reinisch (GDR) 2:11.77 Moscow, Soviet Union 27 July 1980
 

Final A

RankLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
1st, gold medalist(s) 4 Jolanda de Rover  Netherlands 2:12.38 NR
2nd, silver medalist(s) 3 Amy White  United States 2:13.04  
3rd, bronze medalist(s) 1 Anca Pătrășcoiu  Romania 2:13.29  
4 5 Georgina Parkes  Australia 2:14.37  
5 2 Tori Trees  United States 2:15.73  
6 6 Svenja Schlicht  West Germany 2:15.93  
7 7 Carmen Bunaciu  Romania 2:16.15  
8 8 Carmel Clark  New Zealand 2:17.89  
 

Final B

RankLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
9 7 Sandra Dahlmann  West Germany 2:16.93  
10 4 Catherine White  Great Britain 2:17.63  
11 6 Katherine Read  Great Britain 2:18.33  
12 2 Reema Abdo  Canada 2:18.50  
13 5 Yolande van der Straeten  Belgium 2:18.63  
14 3 Naomi Sekido  Japan 2:18.87  
15 1 Sofia Kraft  Sweden 2:19.37  
16 8 Audrey Moore  Australia 2:21.36  
 

Heats

Rule: The eight fastest swimmers advance to final A (Q), while the next eight to final B (q).

RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
2 1 4 Georgina Parkes  Australia 2:14.89 Q
10 1 5 Yolande van der Straeten  Belgium 2:18.49 q
18 1 3 Sabine Pauwels  Belgium 2:21.36  
23 1 6 Manuela Carosi  Italy 2:25.45  
24 1 7 Eva Gysling  Switzerland 2:25.69  
27 1 1 Christine Jacob  Philippines 2:32.91  
  1 2 Lise Lotte Nylund  Norway DNS  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
1 2 4 Jolanda de Rover  Netherlands 2:13.50 Q
4 2 5 Svenja Schlicht  West Germany 2:15.69 Q
8 2 7 Carmel Clark  New Zealand 2:16.78 Q, NR
9 2 6 Catherine White  Great Britain 2:18.02 q
13 2 3 Reema Abdo  Canada 2:19.05 q
20 2 2 Teresa Rivera  Mexico 2:22.94  
25 2 1 Lotta Flink  Hong Kong 2:29.00  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
5 3 5 Tori Trees  United States 2:16.23 Q
6 3 4 Carmen Bunaciu  Romania 2:16.41 Q
11 3 2 Naomi Sekido  Japan 2:18.52 q
16 3 3 Audrey Moore  Australia 2:20.12 q
17 3 6 Brigitte van der Lans  Netherlands 2:20.63  
22 3 7 Nozomi Sunouchi  Japan 2:25.05  
26 3 1 Yan Hong  China 2:32.33  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
3 4 5 Amy White  United States 2:15.40 Q
7 4 4 Anca Pătrășcoiu  Romania 2:16.71 Q
12 4 3 Katherine Read  Great Britain 2:18.92 q
14 4 6 Sandra Dahlmann  West Germany 2:19.59 q
15 4 7 Sofia Kraft  Sweden 2:19.73 q
19 4 2 Melinda Copp  Canada 2:21.39  
21 4 1 Choi Yun-hui  South Korea 2:23.80  
  4 8 Kathy Wong  Hong Kong DNS  
 

Women's 100 metres Breaststroke

 Host City: Los Angeles, United States
Venue(s): Olympic Swim Stadium, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California
Date Started: August 2, 1984
Date Finished: August 2, 1984

 Competitors 30from 21 nations

Summary

In the absence of the East German women, the three pre-meet favorites were Canada'€™s [Anne Ottenbrite], Japan'€™s [Hiroko Nagasaki], and American [Tracy Caulkins]. But they qualified only 6-7-8 in the prelims, and Caulkins only made the final after the disqualification of Italy'€™s [Manuela Dalla Valle] for using an illegal kick. The leading qualifier was Frenchwoman [Catherine Poirot], a veteran with an undistinguished international career, but one who had improved dramatically in the Olympic year. The second best mark in the prelims was set by [Petra van Staveren] of the Netherlands, another international veteran, who had trailed in the East German wakes for several years. The final seemed wide open.

But van Staveren controlled the entire race. She turned a half-bodylength in front of Poirot and Caulkins, although Caulkins had a great turn to almost make up the deficit. But then Ottenbrite and Poirot passed her near the wall to decide the medals. Van Staveren'€™s gold was a surprise but her national record of 1:09.88 made her the fifth fastest performer of all-time. Nagasaki was never a factor, placing sixth. This was the only women'€™s event in Los Angeles in which American women did not win a medal.

 The final of the women's 100 metre backstroke event at the 1984 Summer Olympics was held in the McDonald's Olympic Swim Stadium in Los Angeles, California, on August 2, 1984.
 

Records

Prior to this competition, the existing world and Olympic records were as follows.

World record  Ute Geweniger (GDR) 1:08.51 Rome, Italy 25 August 1983
Olympic record  Ute Geweniger (GDR) 1:10.11 Moscow, Soviet Union 24 July 1980

The following records were established during the competition:

DateRoundNameNationTimeRecord
2 August Final A Petra van Staveren  Netherlands 1:09.88 OR
 

Final A

RankLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
1st, gold medalist(s) 5 Petra van Staveren  Netherlands 1:09.88 OR
2nd, silver medalist(s) 7 Anne Ottenbrite  Canada 1:10.69  
3rd, bronze medalist(s) 4 Catherine Poirot  France 1:10.70  
4 8 Tracy Caulkins  United States 1:10.88  
5 6 Eva-Marie Håkansson  Sweden 1:11.14 NR
6 1 Hiroko Nagasaki  Japan 1:11.33  
7 2 Susan Rapp  United States 1:11.45  
8 3 Jean Hill  Great Britain 1:11.82  
 

Final B

RankLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
9 3 Ute Hasse  West Germany 1:11.44 NR
10 4 Ingrid Lempereur  Belgium 1:11.45 NR
11 5 Dimity Douglas  Australia 1:12.00 OC
12 2 Angelika Knipping  West Germany 1:12.03  
13 6 Lisa Borsholt  Canada 1:12.41  
14 8 Carlotta Tagnin  Italy 1:12.77  
15 7 Patricia Brülhart  Switzerland 1:12.89  
16 1 Annelie Holmström  Sweden 1:13.27  
 

Heats

Rule: The eight fastest swimmers advance to final A (Q), while the next eight to final B (q).

RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
8 1 4 Tracy Caulkins  United States 1:11.99 Q
10 1 3 Ute Hasse  West Germany 1:12.17 q
12 1 5 Lisa Borsholt  Canada 1:12.24 q
17 1 6 Sandra Bowman  Great Britain 1:12.92  
19 1 2 Petra Hillenius  Netherlands 1:14.09  
24 1 7 Maarit Vähäsaari-Sihvonen  Finland 1:14.85  
27 1 1 Chow Lai Yee  Hong Kong 1:17.92  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
1 2 5 Catherine Poirot  France 1:10.69 Q, NR
3 2 2 Jean Hill  Great Britain 1:11.37 Q
6 2 4 Anne Ottenbrite  Canada 1:11.81 Q
10 2 6 Dimity Douglas  Australia 1:12.17 q
14 2 7 Patricia Brülhart  Switzerland 1:12.44 q
16 2 3 Carlotta Tagnin  Italy 1:12.70 q
26 2 1 Rosa María Silva  Uruguay 1:17.11  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
2 3 4 Petra van Staveren  Netherlands 1:11.18 Q
9 3 2 Ingrid Lempereur  Belgium 1:12.08 q
13 3 3 Angelika Knipping  West Germany 1:12.41 q
18 3 7 Sharon Kellett  Australia 1:13.43  
21 3 6 Alicia María Boscatto  Argentina 1:14.45  
25 3 1 Guðrún Ágústsdóttir  Iceland 1:16.70  
29 3 8 Isabel Lardizábal  Honduras 1:25.12  
  3 5 Manuela Dalla Valle  Italy DSQ  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
4 4 3 Eva-Marie Håkansson  Sweden 1:11.41 Q
5 4 5 Susan Rapp  United States 1:11.63 Q
7 4 4 Hiroko Nagasaki  Japan 1:11.82 Q
15 4 6 Annelie Holmström  Sweden 1:12.60 q
20 4 2 Liang Weifen  China 1:14.38  
22 4 7 Kaori Iwasaki  Japan 1:14.68  
23 4 1 Sara Guido  Mexico 1:14.69  
28 4 8 Helen Chow  Malaysia 1:18.99  
 

Women's 200 metres Breaststroke

 Host City: Los Angeles, United States
Venue(s): Olympic Swim Stadium, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California
Date Started: July 30, 1984
Date Finished: July 30, 1984

 Competitors 23from 16 nations

 

Summary

Just before this final, [Alex Baumann] won the men'€™s 400 IM, the first gold medal by a Canadian swimmer since 1912. Watching the race, [Anne Ottenbrite] had tears in her eyes, as she watched her teammate win. Ottenbrite had been placed on the Canadian Olympic squad despite being unable to swim at the Trials because of a recently dislocated kneecap. The favorite in this race, however, was Japan'€™s [Hiroko Nagasaki] who had the the best time in the world in 1983, 2:29.81. But she was bothered in LA by knee tendinitis and qualified only fifth. In the final Nagasaki and Ottenbrite went out in the lead, well ahead of Olympic record pace. But neither could maintain that pace, although Ottenbrite held on for the gold medal, coming home in 2:30.38. Nagasaki faded badly on the final lap and finished out of the medals in fourth. The silver went to American [Susan Rapp], who came from nowhere in the final 50. She was trailed by the surprising Belgian [Ingrid Lempereur], who came into Los Angeles with a PR of only 2:38.06, but improved that to 2:31.40 for the bronze.

The final of the women's 200 metre breaststroke event at the 1984 Summer Olympics was held in the McDonald's Olympic Swim Stadium in Los Angeles, California, on July 30, 1984.

 

Records

Prior to this competition, the existing world and Olympic records were as follows.

World record  Lina Kačiušytė (URS) 2:28.36 Potsdam, East Germany 6 April 1979
Olympic record  Lina Kačiušytė (URS) 2:29.54 Moscow, Soviet Union 23 July 1980
 

Final A

RankLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
1st, gold medalist(s) 3 Anne Ottenbrite  Canada 2:30.38 AM
2nd, silver medalist(s) 6 Susan Rapp  United States 2:31.15 NR
3rd, bronze medalist(s) 4 Ingrid Lempereur  Belgium 2:31.40 NR
4 2 Hiroko Nagasaki  Japan 2:32.93  
5 5 Sharon Kellett  Australia 2:33.60  
6 7 Ute Hasse  West Germany 2:33.82 NR
7 1 Suki Brownsdon  Great Britain 2:35.07  
8 8 Kim Rhodenbaugh  United States 2:35.51  
 

Final B

RankLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
9 4 Manuela Dalla Valle  Italy 2:36.23  
10 2 Petra van Staveren  Netherlands 2:36.32  
11 5 Laura Belotti  Italy 2:36.49  
12 6 Mary Lubawski  Canada 2:36.55  
13 3 Alicia María Boscatto  Argentina 2:36.96  
14 7 Annelie Holmström  Sweden 2:37.62  
15 8 Gaynor Stanley  Great Britain 2:39.32  
16 1 Dimity Douglas  Australia 2:39.33  
 

Heats

Rule: The eight fastest swimmers advance to final A (Q), while the next eight to final B (q).

RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
1 1 2 Ingrid Lempereur  Belgium 2:32.46 Q, NR
3 1 4 Anne Ottenbrite  Canada 2:33.43 Q
11 1 3 Alicia María Boscatto  Argentina 2:36.38 q
12 1 5 Mary Lubawski  Canada 2:36.65 q
13 1 6 Petra van Staveren  Netherlands 2:37.20 q
19 1 7 Kaori Iwasaki  Japan 2:42.69  
22 1 1 Chow Lai Yee  Hong Kong 2:50.45  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
2 2 6 Sharon Kellett  Australia 2:33.23 Q, NR
4 2 4 Susan Rapp  United States 2:33.46 Q
7 2 3 Suki Brownsdon  Great Britain 2:35.54 Q
10 2 5 Laura Belotti  Italy 2:35.99 q
14 2 2 Annelie Holmström  Sweden 2:37.21 q
16 2 7 Gaynor Stanley  Great Britain 2:38.54 q
20 2 1 Guðrún Ágústsdóttir  Iceland 2:44.85 NR
23 2 8 Isabel Lardizábal  Honduras 3:04.26  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
5 3 4 Hiroko Nagasaki  Japan 2:34.46 Q
5 3 5 Ute Hasse  West Germany 2:34.46 Q
7 3 3 Kim Rhodenbaugh  United States 2:35.54 Q
9 3 6 Manuela Dalla Valle  Italy 2:35.75 q
15 3 2 Dimity Douglas  Australia 2:38.47 q
17 3 1 Sara Guido  Mexico 2:38.87 NR
18 3 7 Petra Hillenius  Netherlands 2:41.57  
21 3 8 Rosa María Silva  Uruguay 2:50.01  
 

Women's 100 metres Butterfly

 Host City: Los Angeles, United States
Venue(s): Olympic Swim Stadium, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California
Date Started: August 2, 1984
Date Finished: August 2, 1984

 Competitors3 6from 24 nations

Summary

The greatest female butterfly swimmer of all-time was in Los Angeles, so the gold medal went to [Mary T. Meagher]. Mary T would have been favored to win both butterfly events at Moscow, as the world record holder, but the boycott put paid to those hopes. In 1981 she had won the US Nationals in 57.93, a stunning Beamonesque mark that broke her world record by 1.33 seconds and would last as the world record until 1999. In 1982 she won the World Championships in the 100 fly. Swimming World magazine wrote '€œFrom 1979 through 1982, Mary T. Meagher dominated the 100 butterfly probably more than any other swimmer has in any event.'€ But by 1983 Mary T had grown up, was a college freshman at U Cal Berkeley, gained the requisite freshman-15, did not make the US team for the 1983 Pan Ams, and had only the seventh fastest time in the world that year.

But wanting to prove herself at the Olympics, and to the East Germans, Mary T dropped out of school and moved to Mission Viejo to dedicate herself to Olympic gold. In January 1984 she swam 59.63 at the USS International, her best time since 1982, but she was beaten at the US Trials in June by [Jenna Johnson]. She and her coach, Mark Schubert, were concerned but he convinced her that she had overtapered for the Trials. In the prelims in Los Angeles, Mary T qualified first with 59.05, the second-fastest performance ever, followed by Johnson with 59.99. The third-fastest qualifier was the Netherlands' [Annemarie Verstappen], but she was 1½ seconds behind Johnson.

In the final Johnson went out suicidally in 27.18 '€“ Meagher had recorded only 27.75 in her 57.96 world record. Meagher also bettered than, turning in 27.47, and she had more left. But it took 90 metres for Meagher to finally get past Johnson, who was by then struggling. The gold medal time for Meagher was 59.26, Johnson coming home in 1:00.19, with West German [Karin Seick] outlasting Verstappen for bronze.

 The final of the women's 100 metre butterfly event at the 1984 Summer Olympics was held in the McDonald's Olympic Swim Stadium in Los Angeles, California, on August 2, 1984.
 

Records

Prior to this competition, the existing world and Olympic records were as follows.

World record  Mary T. Meagher (USA) 57.93 Brown Deer, United States 16 August 1981
Olympic record  Kornelia Ender (GDR) 1:00.13 Montreal, Canada 22 July 1976
 

The following records were established during the competition:

DateRoundNameNationTimeRecord
2 August Heat 4 Mary T. Meagher  United States 59.05 OR
 

Final A

RankLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
1st, gold medalist(s) 4 Mary T. Meagher  United States 59.26  
2nd, silver medalist(s) 5 Jenna Johnson  United States 1:00.19  
3rd, bronze medalist(s) 1 Karin Seick  West Germany 1:01.36  
4 3 Annemarie Verstappen  Netherlands 1:01.56  
5 6 Michelle MacPherson  Canada 1:01.58  
6 2 Janet Tibbits  Australia 1:01.78  
7 7 Conny van Bentum  Netherlands 1:01.94  
8 8 Ina Beyermann  West Germany 1:02.11  

Final B

RankLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
9 4 Lisa Curry-Kenny  Australia 1:01.25  
10 6 Nicola Fibbens  Great Britain 1:01.48 NR
11 5 Kiyomi Takahashi  Japan 1:02.55  
12 3 Agneta Eriksson  Sweden 1:02.64  
13 2 Ann Osgerby  Great Britain 1:02.98  
14 8 Takemi Ise  Japan 1:03.33  
15 1 Sonja Hausladen  Austria 1:03.37  
16 7 Anna Doig  New Zealand 1:03.65  

Heats

Rule: The eight fastest swimmers advance to final A (Q), while the next eight to final B (q).

RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
9 1 4 Lisa Curry-Kenny  Australia 1:02.47 q
10 1 5 Kiyomi Takahashi  Japan 1:02.79 q
14 1 3 Anna Doig  New Zealand 1:03.15 q
17 1 6 Agneta Mårtensson  Sweden 1:03.84  
31 1 7 Kathy Wong  Hong Kong 1:07.25  
34 1 1 Sharon Pickering  Fiji 1:11.49  
  1 2 Hadar Rubinstein  Israel DNS  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
6 2 5 Conny van Bentum  Netherlands 1:02.01 Q
7 2 4 Karin Seick  West Germany 1:02.21 Q
11 2 3 Agneta Eriksson  Sweden 1:02.97 q
22 2 6 Shelley Cramer  Virgin Islands 1:04.43  
23 2 2 Brigitte Wanderer  Austria 1:05.22  
27 2 7 Julie Parkes  Ireland 1:06.20  
33 2 1 Karen Slowing-Aceituno  Guatemala 1:10.68  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
4 3 5 Michelle MacPherson  Canada 1:01.57 Q
8 3 6 Ina Beyermann  West Germany 1:02.36 Q
16 3 4 Takemi Ise  Japan 1:03.37 q
17 3 3 Marie Moore  Canada 1:03.84  
19 3 2 Roberta Lanzarotti  Italy 1:03.88  
25 3 7 Faten Ghattas  Tunisia 1:05.91  
32 3 1 Nevine Hafez  Egypt 1:10.45  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
1 4 4 Mary T. Meagher  United States 59.05 Q, OR
5 4 5 Janet Tibbits  Australia 1:01.97 Q
12 4 3 Nicola Fibbens  Great Britain 1:02.98 q
15 4 6 Sonja Hausladen  Austria 1:03.20 q
20 4 2 Li Jinlan  China 1:03.97  
26 4 7 Karin Brandes  Peru 1:05.96  
30 4 1 Blanca Morales  Guatemala 1:06.99  
 
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
2 5 4 Jenna Johnson  United States 59.99 Q
3 5 5 Annemarie Verstappen  Netherlands 1:01.50 Q
13 5 3 Ann Osgerby  Great Britain 1:03.09 q
21 5 6 Carole Brook  Switzerland 1:03.99  
24 5 2 Cristina Quintarelli  Italy 1:05.35  
28 5 1 María Urbina  Mexico 1:06.65  
29 5 7 Jodie Lawaetz  Virgin Islands 1:06.82  
35 5 8 Daniela Galassi  San Marino 1:06.82  
 

Women's 200 metres Butterfly

 Host City: Los Angeles, United States
Venue(s): Olympic Swim Stadium, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California
Date Started: August 4, 1984
Date Finished: August 4, 1984

 Competitors 31from 20 nations

Summary

From 1979-82 [Mary T. Meagher] became the greatest butterfly swimmer ever. She set five world marks in this event, topped by her 2:05.96 at the US Nationals in 1981, when she also shattered the 100 fly record with 57.93. Both world records would stay on the books until 1999, but after starting college in 1983, Meagher lost her dominance. However, she dropped out of school in 1984 to focus on Olympic training and had already won the 100 fly in Los Angeles when this event started. She had come back to dominate, although perhaps not what she once was.

Swimming World noted that Mary T was the only swimmer who was hurt by the absence of the East German women, as they could have pushed her to even better times, and she would have had the chance to prove her dominance over them. She had actually lost the 1982 World Championships in the 200 fly to [Ines Geisler]. After qualifying first in Los Angeles, Mary T was out in front in the final from the gun. Her opening 50 was 29.30, actually under her world record pace. She slowed by 150 but still led her teammate [Nancy Hogshead] by two bodylengths. Meagher finished in 2:06.90 for her third gold medal of the Olympics, also including the medley relay. It was the third-fastest time ever, and gave her the seven fastest 200 fly times of all-time. Behind her, Hogshead struggled on the final lap and was passed by Australia'€™s [Karen Phillips], who won silver, and bronze medalist [Ina Beyermann].

 The final of the women's 200 metre butterfly event at the 1984 Summer Olympics was held in the McDonald's Olympic Swim Stadium in Los Angeles, California, on August 4, 1984. The first eight qualified for the final, the next eight for the B-final.
 

Records

Prior to this competition, the existing world and Olympic records were as follows.

World record  Mary T. Meagher (USA) 2:05.96 Brown Deer, United States 13 August 1981
Olympic record  Ines Geißler (GDR) 2:10.44 Moscow, Soviet Union 21 July 1980

The following records were established during the competition:

DateRoundNameNationTimeRecord
4 August Final A Mary T. Meagher  United States 2:06.90 OR
 

Final A

RankLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
1st, gold medalist(s) 4 Mary T. Meagher  United States 2:06.90 OR
2nd, silver medalist(s) 5 Karen Phillips  Australia 2:10.56 OC
3rd, bronze medalist(s) 2 Ina Beyermann  West Germany 2:11.91 NR
4 6 Nancy Hogshead  United States 2:11.98  
5 3 Samantha Purvis  Great Britain 2:12.33  
6 7 Naoko Kume  Japan 2:12.57  
7 1 Sonja Hausladen  Austria 2:15.38  
8 8 Conny van Bentum  Netherlands 2:17.39  
 

Final B

RankLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
9 3 Jill Horstead  Canada 2:13.49  
10 5 Roberta Lanzarotti  Italy 2:14.54  
11 6 Marie Moore  Canada 2:14.96  
12 4 Kiyomi Takahashi  Japan 2:16.27  
13 8 Monica Olmi  Italy 2:16.47  
14 2 Petra Zindler  West Germany 2:16.50  
15 1 Carole Brook  Switzerland 2:16.74  
16 7 Ann Osgerby  Great Britain 2:19.10  
 

Heats

Rule: The eight fastest swimmers advance to final A (Q), while the next eight to final B (q).

RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
3 1 6 Samantha Purvis  Great Britain 2:11.97 Q, NR
7 1 5 Sonja Hausladen  Austria 2:13.50 Q, NR
11 1 3 Roberta Lanzarotti  Italy 2:14.53 q
14 1 4 Petra Zindler  West Germany 2:15.20 q
19 1 2 Gail Jonson  New Zealand 2:20.55  
20 1 7 Anna Doig  New Zealand 2:20.81  
21 1 1 Julie Parkes  Ireland 2:20.85  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
6 2 4 Naoko Kume  Japan 2:13.31 Q
8 2 5 Janet Tibbits  Australia 2:13.74 QSO
15 2 3 Ann Osgerby  Great Britain 2:16.31 q
16 2 6 Carole Brook  Switzerland 2:18.66 q
17 2 2 Monica Olmi  Italy 2:18.72 q
22 2 7 Lisa Ann Wen  Chinese Taipei 2:21.10  
25 2 1 Faten Ghattas  Tunisia 2:22.58  
  2 8 Nevine Hafez  Egypt DNS  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
2 3 6 Karen Phillips  Australia 2:11.81 Q
4 3 4 Nancy Hogshead  United States 2:12.10 Q
10 3 3 Kiyomi Takahashi  Japan 2:14.37 q
13 3 5 Marie Moore  Canada 2:14.95 q
18 3 2 Kathrine Bomstad  Norway 2:19.46  
26 3 7 Hadar Rubinstein  Israel 2:22.78  
27 3 8 Chang Hui-chien  Chinese Taipei 2:24.89  
29 3 1 Jodie Lawaetz  Virgin Islands 2:25.58  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
1 4 4 Mary T. Meagher  United States 2:11.48 Q
5 4 5 Ina Beyermann  West Germany 2:13.26 Q
8 4 3 Conny van Bentum  Netherlands 2:13.74 QSO
12 4 6 Jill Horstead  Canada 2:14.88 q
23 4 2 Brigitte Wanderer  Austria 2:21.16  
24 4 7 Shelley Cramer  Virgin Islands 2:22.39  
28 4 8 Blanca Morales  Guatemala 2:25.03  
  4 1 Karin Brandes  Peru DNS  

Swimoff

RankLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
1 4 Conny van Bentum  Netherlands 2:13.60 Q
2 5 Janet Tibbits  Australia 2:15.54 q, WD
 

Women's 200 metres Individual Medley

 Host City: Los Angeles, United States
Venue(s): Olympic Swim Stadium, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California
Date Started: August 3, 1984
Date Finished: August 3, 1984

 Competitors 30from 22 nations

Summary

As far back as 1978 [Tracy Caulkins] was the best swimmer in the world, being named that year World Swimmer of the Year. She was also American Swimmer of the year in 1980-82, and had been crushed by the 1980 Moscow boycott. In 1978 she had won both the 200 and 400 IM at the World Championships, but in 1982 had trailed in third in both races at the Worlds, as both were won by East German [Petra Schneider], who had broken Caulkins' world marks in 1980. Five days before this race Caulkins had won gold in the 400 IM.

The 200 IM final was the final race of Tracy Caulkins' vaunted career. She was close to her old self, winning by 2½ seconds over teammate [Nancy Hogshead], with Australians finishing 3-4, with [Michelle Pearson] taking bronze, followed by [Lisa Curry]. Caulkins' time of 2:12.64 was the fourth fastest performance ever, although three weeks later East German [Ute Geweniger] won the Friendship Games in 2:11.79, close to her world record of 2:11.73, set in 1981.

Caulkins never competed again, as Swimming World noted, "The woman many consider to be the greatest female swimmer in history had left the pool." She married Australian swimmer [Mark Stockwell], who she met in Los Angeles, and they settled in Australia. Nancy Hogshead also retired after Los Angeles. The Duke University grad attended law school, and later became an outspoken proponent for women's sports.

 The final of the women's 200 metre individual medley event at the 1984 Summer Olympics was held in the McDonald's Olympic Swim Stadium in Los Angeles, California, on August 3, 1984. The first eight qualified for the final, the next eight for the B-final.
 

Records

Prior to this competition, the existing world and Olympic records were as follows.

World record  Ute Geweniger (GDR) 2:11.73 Magdeburg, East Germany 4 July 1981
Olympic record  Shane Gould (AUS) 2:23.07 Munich, West Germany 28 August 1972

The following records were established during the competition:

DateRoundNameNationTimeRecord
3 August Heat 4 Tracy Caulkins  United States 2:14.47 OR
3 August Final A Tracy Caulkins  United States 2:12.64 OR
 

Final A

RankLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
1st, gold medalist(s) 4 Tracy Caulkins  United States 2:12.64 OR
2nd, silver medalist(s) 5 Nancy Hogshead  United States 2:15.17  
3rd, bronze medalist(s) 3 Michelle Pearson  Australia 2:15.92 OC
4 8 Lisa Curry-Kenny  Australia 2:16.75  
5 6 Christiane Pielke  West Germany 2:17.82 NR
6 1 Manuela Dalla Valle  Italy 2:19.69  
7 7 Petra Zindler  West Germany 2:19.86  
8 8 Kathrine Bomstad  Norway 2:20.48  
 

Final B

RankLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
9 3 Maarit Vähäsaari-Sihvonen  Finland 2:19.27 NR
10 4 Michelle MacPherson  Canada 2:19.34  
11 5 Alison Dozzo  Canada 2:19.70  
12 6 Anette Philipsson  Sweden 2:21.54  
13 8 Gaynor Stanley  Great Britain 2:21.71  
14 7 Zara Long  Great Britain 2:22.25  
15 2 Hideka Koshimizu  Japan 2:22.81  
16 1 Laurence Bensimon  France 2:27.13  
 

Heats

Rule: The eight fastest swimmers advance to final A (Q), while the next eight to final B (q).

RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
4 1 5 Christiane Pielke  West Germany 2:19.17 Q, NR
9 1 4 Michelle MacPherson  Canada 2:20.68 q
17 1 3 Laurence Bensimon  France 2:24.34 q
18 1 6 Gaynor Stanley  Great Britain 2:24.94 q
19 1 2 Gail Jonson  New Zealand 2:25.00  
23 1 7 Faten Ghattas  Tunisia 2:29.77  
26 1 1 Sharon Pickering  Fiji 2:34.77  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
8 2 4 Lisa Curry-Kenny  Australia 2:20.57 Q
10 2 5 Alison Dozzo  Canada 2:20.85 q
12 2 6 Anette Philipsson  Sweden 2:21.70 q
16 2 3 Zara Long  Great Britain 2:23.89 q
20 2 2 Brigitte Wanderer  Austria 2:26.85  
21 2 7 Yan Hong  China 2:27.95  
25 2 1 Lotta Flink  Hong Kong 2:31.70  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
2 3 4 Nancy Hogshead  United States 2:16.29 Q
3 3 5 Michelle Pearson  Australia 2:17.46 Q, OC
7 3 3 Manuela Dalla Valle  Italy 2:20.50 Q
11 3 6 Maarit Vähäsaari-Sihvonen  Finland 2:21.05 q
22 3 1 Helen Chow  Malaysia 2:29.25  
24 3 7 Karin Brandes  Peru 2:29.87  
  3 2 Silvia Persi  Italy DNS  
  3 8 Rosa María Silva  Uruguay DNS  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
1 4 4 Tracy Caulkins  United States 2:14.47 Q, OR
5 4 3 Kathrine Bomstad  Norway 2:19.88 Q, NR
6 4 5 Petra Zindler  West Germany 2:20.05 Q
13 4 8 Sabine Pauwels  Belgium 2:22.86 q, WD
14 4 6 Maria Kardum  Sweden 2:22.87 q, WD
15 4 7 Hideka Koshimizu  Japan 2:23.38 q
27 4 1 Blanca Morales  Guatemala 2:38.16  
  4 2 Beda Leirvaag  Norway DNS  
 

Women's 400 metres Individual Medley

 Host City: Los Angeles, United States
Venue(s): Olympic Swim Stadium, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California
Date Started: July 29, 1984
Date Finished: July 29, 1984

 Competitors 20from 14 nations

Summary

[Tracy Caulkins] had been the best all-around swimmer in the world in 1978-80, being named World Swimmer of the Year in 1978, after winning both IM races at the 1978 World Championships in world record times. But by 1984 she had been surpassed by the East Germans, notably [Petra Schneider], the 1980 Olympic champion in this event, the current world record holder, and the 1982 World Champion in both IMs. Without the East Germans in Los Angeles there was no competition for Caulkins. She won the gold by 15 metres, and over nine seconds, recording 4:39.24 '€“ approaching Schneider, who had won in Moscow by over 10 seconds.

Trailing in second place here was Australian [Suzie Landells] who had barely qualified for the final, placing eighth by 1/100th of a second. In 1986 Landells won both IMs at the Commonwealth Games. Another surprise in Los Angeles was the bronze medalist, [Petra Zindler] of West Germany. Her best time in 1984 was only 4:52.38, but she qualified third fastest and matched that in the final, improving to 4:48.57.

At the Friendship Games, three weeks hence, this event was won by Soviet swimmer [Yelena Dendeberova] in 4:43.78, well off Caulkins' Olympic winning time, and trailed by East German [Kathleen Nord], who Caulkins considered her biggest rival in 1984, but who swam poorly to finish in 4:49.49.

 The final of the women's 400 metre individual medley event at the 1984 Summer Olympics was held in the McDonald's Olympic Swim Stadium in Los Angeles, California, on July 29, 1984. The first eight qualified for the final, the next eight for the B-final.
 

Records

Prior to this competition, the existing world and Olympic records were as follows.

World record  Petra Schneider (GDR) 4:36.10 Guayaquil, Ecuador 1 August 1982
Olympic record  Petra Schneider (GDR) 4:36.29 Moscow, Soviet Union 26 July 1980
 

Final A

RankLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
1st, gold medalist(s) 4 Tracy Caulkins  United States 4:39.24 AM
2nd, silver medalist(s) 8 Suzie Landells  Australia 4:48.30 OC
3rd, bronze medalist(s) 6 Petra Zindler  West Germany 4:48.57  
4 5 Sue Heon  United States 4:49.41  
5 3 Nathalie Gingras  Canada 4:50.55  
6 7 Donna McGinnis  Canada 4:50.65  
7 1 Gaynor Stanley  Great Britain 4:52.83  
8 8 Kathrine Bomstad  Norway 4:53.28  
 

Final B

RankLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
9 6 Sarah Hardcastle  Great Britain 4:51.55  
10 3 Sofia Kraft  Sweden 4:53.25 NR
11 5 Karen Phillips  Australia 4:53.37  
12 4 Roberta Felotti  Italy 4:57.74  
13 2 Sonja Hausladen  Austria 4:57.78 NR
14 7 Hideka Koshimizu  Japan 4:58.02  
15 1 Gail Jonson  New Zealand 4:58.40  
16 8 Anca Pătrășcoiu  Romania 5:05.53  
 

Heats

Rule: The eight fastest swimmers advance to final A (Q), while the next eight to final B (q).

RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
4 1 4 Petra Zindler  West Germany 4:52.49 Q
6 1 5 Donna McGinnis  Canada 4:53.30 Q
7 1 3 Gaynor Stanley  Great Britain 4:53.70 Q
11 1 6 Sofia Kraft  Sweden 4:55.10 q
14 1 2 Hideka Koshimizu  Japan 4:59.18 q
  1 7 Beda Leirvaag  Norway DNS  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
2 2 4 Sue Heon  United States 4:51.32 Q
3 2 3 Nathalie Gingras  Canada 4:51.77 Q
5 2 5 Kathrine Bomstad  Norway 4:52.74 Q
13 2 2 Sonja Hausladen  Austria 4:58.68 q
16 2 6 Anca Pătrășcoiu  Romania 5:03.97 q, NR
17 2 7 Monika Bayer  Austria 5:05.61  
18 2 1 Karin Brandes  Peru 5:11.92  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
1 3 4 Tracy Caulkins  United States 4:44.42 Q
8 3 5 Suzie Landells  Australia 4:54.13 Q
9 3 6 Roberta Felotti  Italy 4:54.14 q
10 3 7 Karen Phillips  Australia 4:54.28 q
12 3 3 Sarah Hardcastle  Great Britain 4:55.78 q
15 3 2 Gail Jonson  New Zealand 4:59.92 q
  4 1 Faten Ghattas  Tunisia DNS  
 

Women's 4 x— 100 metres Medley Relay

 Host City: Los Angeles, United States
Venue(s): Olympic Swim Stadium, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California
Date Started: August 3, 1984
Date Finished: August 3, 1984

 Competitors 54from 12 nations

Summary

American women had already won the 100 freestyle, 100 backstroke, and 100 butterfly in Los Angeles, so their victory in this event seemed assured, given that they did not have to face the East Germans. In the prelims this status became more solid when their biggest rivals, the Netherlands, seemed to have won the first heat in a Dutch record of 4:11.29, only to be disqualified for jumping too soon on an exchange. In heat two another challenger, Australia, was also disqualified for the same infraction. This made the final anti-climactic as the USA led from the first leg and won easily, recording 4:08.34 to lead West Germany by over 3½ seconds. Canada came in for the bronze medal, as two more teams, Japan and Sweden, were disqualified in the final. Three weeks later the East German medley relay team set another world record of 4:03.69 to win the Friendship Games, followed by the Soviet Union, which recorded 4:08.13.

 The final of the women's 4 × 100 metre freestyle relay event at the 1984 Summer Olympics was held in Los Angeles, California, on July 31, 1984.
 

Records

Prior to this competition, the existing world and Olympic records were as follows.

World record  East Germany (GDR)
Barbara Krause (54.90)
Caren Metschuck (55.61)
Ines Diers (55.90)
Sarina Hülsenbeck (56.30)
3:42.71 Moscow, Soviet Union 27 July 1980
Olympic record  East Germany (GDR)
Barbara Krause (54.90)
Caren Metschuck (55.61)
Ines Diers (55.90)
Sarina Hülsenbeck (56.30)
3:42.71 Moscow, Soviet Union 27 July 1980
 

Final

RankLaneNationSwimmersTimeNotes
1st, gold medalist(s) 4  United States Jenna Johnson (56.46)
Carrie Steinseifer (55.87)
Dara Torres (55.92)
Nancy Hogshead (55.18)
3:43.43 AM
2nd, silver medalist(s) 3  Netherlands Annemarie Verstappen (55.94)
Elles Voskes (56.77)
Desi Reijers (55.62)
Conny van Bentum (56.07)
3:44.40 NR
3rd, bronze medalist(s) 5  West Germany Iris Zscherpe (57.26)
Susanne Schuster (56.32)
Christiane Pielke (56.24)
Karin Seick (55.74)
3:45.56 NR
4 6  Australia Michelle Pearson (56.51)
Angela Russell (56.97)
Anna McVann (58.26)
Lisa Curry (56.05)
3:47.79 OC
5 2  Canada Pamela Rai (57.70)
Carol Klimpel (57.47)
Cheryl McArton (57.52)
Jane Kerr (56.81)
3:49.50  
6 7  Great Britain June Croft (57.49)
Nicola Fibbens (57.33)
Debra Gore (57.24)
Annabelle Cripps (58.06)
3:50.12 NR
7 1  Sweden Maria Kardum (57.93)
Agneta Eriksson (57.19)
Petra Hildér (57.90)
Karin Furuhed (58.22)
3:51.24  
8 8  France Carole Amoric (58.58)
Sophie Kamoun (57.24)
Véronique Jardin (57.83)
Laurence Bensimon (58.50)
3:52.15 NR
 

Heats

Rule: The eight fastest teams advance to the final (Q).

 
RankHeatLaneNationSwimmersTimeNotes
2 1 4  West Germany Iris Zscherpe (57.04)
Susanne Schuster (56.50)
Christiane Pielke (56.90)
Karin Seick (56.05)
3:46.49 Q, NR
4 1 6  Australia Lisa Curry (57.79)
Angela Russell (57.11)
Janet Tibbits (58.16)
Michelle Pearson (56.55)
3:49.61 Q
7 1 5  Sweden Maria Kardum (58.32)
Agneta Eriksson (56.92)
Petra Hildér (58.18)
Malin Rundgren (58.85)
3:52.27 Q
8 1 3  France Sophie Kamoun (58.40)
Carole Amoric (57.74)
Laurence Bensimon (58.74)
Véronique Jardin (57.79)
3:52.67 Q
11 1 2  Mexico Patricia Kohlmann (58.58)
Teresa Rivera (59.01)
Rosa Fuentes (1:00.80)
Irma Huerta (59.92)
3:58.31  
12 1 7  Hong Kong Kathy Wong (1:00.67)
Fenella Ng (1:02.51)
Lotta Flink (1:03.61)
Chow Lai Yee (1:05.84)
4:12.53  
RankHeatLaneNationSwimmersTimeNotes
1 2 4  United States Dara Torres (56.88)
Jill Sterkel (55.42)
Jenna Johnson (55.63)
Mary Wayte (55.63)
3:43.56 Q, AM
3 2 5  Netherlands Annemarie Verstappen (56.30)
Elles Voskes (56.98)
Desi Reijers (56.08)
Wilma van Velsen (57.57)
3:47.65 Q
5 2 3  Canada Jane Kerr (57.82)
Maureen New (57.60)
Cheryl McArton (57.48)
Carol Klimpel (57.44)
3:50.40 Q
6 2 6  Great Britain Annabelle Cripps (57.82)
Nicola Fibbens (57.60)
Debra Gore (57.48)
June Croft (57.44)
3:51.47 Q
9 2 7  Italy Monica Olmi (59.02)
Silvia Persi (57.02)
Grazia Colombo (58.40)
Manuela Dalla Valle (58.45)
3:52.89 NR
10 2 2  Japan Junko Sakurai (59.18)
Chikako Nakamori (58.15)
Miki Saito (58.98)
Kaori Yanase (58.37)
3:54.68  
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