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1984  Los Angeles Summer Olympics

1984 Summer Olympics - The Results (Swimming - Men)

Swimming at the 1984 Los Angeles Summer Games

 

Host City: Los Angeles, United States
Date Started: July 29, 1984
Date Finished: August 4, 1984
Events: 29

Participants: 494 (308 men and 185 women) from 67 countries
Youngest Participant: GBR Zara Long (13 years, 271 days)
Oldest Participant: PHI Jairulla Jaitulla (30 years, 244 days)
Most Medals (Athlete): 3 athletes with 4 medals
Most Medals (Country): USA United States (34 medals)

Participating nations

494 swimmers from 67 nations competed.

  •  Argentina (6)
  •  Australia (31)
  •  Austria (6)
  •  Bahamas (2)
  •  Bahrain (2)
  •  Barbados (1)
  •  Belgium (4)
  •  Bermuda (1)
  •  Brazil (7)
  •  Canada (37)
  •  China (14)
  •  Chinese Taipei (5)
  •  Colombia (1)
  •  Costa Rica (1)
  •  Denmark (3)
  •  Egypt (8)
  •  El Salvador (2)
  •  Fiji (3)
  •  Finland (2)
  •  France (16)
  •  Great Britain (33)
  •  Greece (3)
  •  Guatemala (6)
  •  Honduras (6)
  •  Hong Kong (8)
  •  Iceland (4)
  •  Indonesia (1)
  •  Ireland (2)
  •  Israel (3)
  •  Italy (26)
  •  Jamaica (4)
  •  Japan (22)
  •  Kuwait (5)
  •  Lebanon (4)
  •  Malaysia (1)
  •  Mexico (12)
  •  Monaco (1)
  •  Mozambique (2)
  •  Netherlands (16)
  •  Netherlands Antilles (3)
  •  New Zealand (8)
  •  Norway (3)
  •  Panama (1)
  •  Peru (5)
  •  Philippines (4)
  •  Portugal (2)
  •  Puerto Rico (5)
  •  Romania (2)
  •  San Marino (2)
  •  Singapore (4)
  •  South Korea (3)
  •  Spain (8)
  •  Sri Lanka (1)
  •  Suriname (2)
  •  Swaziland (1)
  •  Sweden (24)
  •  Switzerland (13)
  •  Trinidad and Tobago (1)
  •  Tunisia (1)
  •  Turkey (4)
  •  Uganda (1)
  •  United States (43)
  •  Virgin Islands (7)
  •  Uruguay (2)
  •  Venezuela (6)
  •  West Germany (24)
  •  Yugoslavia (3)

Overview

The Soviet-led Eastern Bloc boycott allowed the United States to dominate the 1984 swimming events, especially on the women'€™s side, with the absence of the East German (German Democratic Republic) women. On the men'€™s side, the biggest loss was not seeing Soviet distance star [Vladimir Salnikov].

The swimming venue was specially built for the Los Angeles Olympics and was one of only two venues that had to be built from scratch for the 1984 Olympics, the other being the cycling velodrome. The Olympic Swim Stadium was built with donations from McDonald'€™s and after the Olympics was called the McDonald'€™s Olympic Swim Stadium, and became the home swim stadium for the University of Southern California (USC). The stadium was closed in 2013 and renovated, and was then renamed the Uytengsu Aquatics Center, after a USC alumnus. The 1984 swim stadium was an outdoor venue, which was the first time since 1960 that Olympic swimming was contested outdoors. After the Los Angeles Olympics this also occurred at Barcelona in 1992, but through 2012, all Olympic swimming competition has been outdoors (except for the long-distance swims added in 2008).

The programs were returned to their status of 1968 and 1972, with 15 men'€™s events and 14 women'€™s events. The 200 individual medley was restored for both genders, and the men had the 4x100 freestyle relay added back to the program.

One major change had occurred in the program. Because of the United States winning so many medals, often sweeping the medals in events, and the GDR women now doing the same, nations could no longer enter three swimmers in the individual events, but were now limited to only two in each individual event.

The United States won 21 of 29 events and 34 of 87 medals, easily leading both lists. On the men'€™s side they won 9 golds and 15 medals, while their women won 12 golds and 19 medals. Seven American swimmers won three gold medals, as follows '€“ [Nancy Hogshead], [Mike Heath], [Tracy Caulkins], [Mary T. Meagher], [Carrie Steinseifer], [Rick Carey], and [Rowdy Gaines]. Three swimmers won four medals '€“ Hogshead, Heath, and West Germany [Michael GrosŸ].

Swimming at the 1984 Summer Olympics, held at the McDonald's Olympic Swim Stadium, located on the USC campus. There was a total of 494 participants from 67 countries competing.

This was the first Olympic games at which only two swimmers per country, per event, were permitted. Previously, three swimmers were allowed and many countries would sweep the medal stand.

 
  

Medal table (both men & women)

 
RankNationGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1  United States (USA) 21 13 0 34
2  Canada (CAN) 4 3 3 10
3  West Germany (FRG) 2 3 6 11
4  Netherlands (NED) 2 1 3 6
5  Australia (AUS) 1 5 6 12
6  Great Britain (GBR) 0 1 4 5
7  France (FRA) 0 1 1 2
8  Brazil (BRA) 0 1 0 1
9  Sweden (SWE) 0 0 2 2
10  Belgium (BEL) 0 0 1 1
 Romania (ROM) 0 0 1 1
 Switzerland (SUI) 0 0 1 1
 Venezuela (VEN) 0 0 1 1
Totals (13 nations) 30 28 29 87

Medal summary

Men's events

EventGoldSilverBronze
100 m freestyle Rowdy Gaines
 United States
49.80 OR Mark Stockwell
 Australia
50.24 Per Johansson
 Sweden
50.31
200 m freestyle Michael Gross
 West Germany
1:47.44 WR Mike Heath
 United States
1:49.10 Thomas Fahrner
 West Germany
1:49.69
400 m freestyle George DiCarlo
 United States
3:51.23 OR John Mykkanen
 United States
3:51.49 Justin Lemberg
 Australia
3:51.79
1500 m freestyle Mike O'Brien
 United States
15:05.20 George DiCarlo
 United States
15:10.59 Stefan Pfeiffer
 West Germany
15:12.11
100 m backstroke Rick Carey
 United States
55.79 Dave Wilson
 United States
56.35 Mike West
 Canada
56.49
200 m backstroke Rick Carey
 United States
2:00.23 Frédéric Delcourt
 France
2:01.75 Cameron Henning
 Canada
2:02.37
100 m breaststroke Steve Lundquist
 United States
1:01.65 WR Victor Davis
 Canada
1:01.99 Peter Evans
 Australia
1:02.97
200 m breaststroke Victor Davis
 Canada
2:13.34 WR Glenn Beringen
 Australia
2:15.79 Étienne Dagon
 Switzerland
2:17.41
100 m butterfly Michael Gross
 West Germany
53.08 WR Pablo Morales
 United States
53.23 Glenn Buchanan
 Australia
53.85
200 m butterfly Jon Sieben
 Australia
1:57.04 WR Michael Gross
 West Germany
1:57.40 Rafael Vidal
 Venezuela
1:57.51
200 m individual medley Alex Baumann
 Canada
2:01.42 WR Pablo Morales
 United States
2:03.05 Neil Cochran
 Great Britain
2:04.38
400 m individual medley Alex Baumann
 Canada
4:17.41 WR Ricardo Prado
 Brazil
4:18.45 Rob Woodhouse
 Australia
4:20.50
4 × 100 m freestyle relay  United States (USA)
Chris Cavanaugh
Mike Heath
Matt Biondi
Rowdy Gaines
Tom Jager*
Robin Leamy*
3:19.03 WR  Australia (AUS)
Greg Fasala
Neil Brooks
Michael Delany
Mark Stockwell
3:19.68  Sweden (SWE)
Thomas Lejdström
Per Johansson
Bengt Baron
Mikael Örn
Rikard Milton*
Michael Söderlund*
3:22.69
4×200 m freestyle relay  United States (USA)
Mike Heath
David Larson
Jeff Float
Bruce Hayes
Geoff Gaberino*
Richard Saeger*
7:15.69 WR  West Germany (FRG)
Thomas Fahrner
Dirk Korthals
Alexander Schowtka
Michael Gross
Rainer Henkel*
7:15.73  Great Britain (GBR)
Neil Cochran
Paul Easter
Paul Howe
Andrew Astbury
7:24.78
4×100 m medley relay  United States (USA)
Rick Carey
Steve Lundquist
Pablo Morales
Rowdy Gaines
Dave Wilson*
Richard Schroeder*
Mike Heath*
Tom Jager*
3:39.30 WR  Canada (CAN)
Mike West
Victor Davis
Tom Ponting
Sandy Goss
3:43.23  Australia (AUS)
Mark Kerry
Peter Evans
Glenn Buchanan
Mark Stockwell
Jon Sieben*
Neil Brooks*
3:43.25

* Swimmers who participated in the heats only and received medals.

 

 

Men's 100 metres Freestyle

 Host City: Los Angeles, United States
Venue(s): Olympic Swim Stadium, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California
Date Started: July 31, 1984
Date Finished: July 31, 1984

Competitors 68from 43 nations

Summary

In 1980 [Rowdy Gaines] was the best sprint swimmer in the world and was expected to win four gold medals, until Jimmy Carter told him he could not compete in Moscow. He was World Swimmer of the Year in 1980, and in 1981 finally bettered the 100 freestyle world record with 49.36. By 1984 he was not the swimmer he had been in 1980 but hoped to make up for having to miss the 1980 Olympics. In the end he came through for the gold medal but not without some controversy. The runner-up was Australian [Mark Stockwell], and he was upset, thinking the start had not been fair, "I don't want to take away anything from Rowdy. I mean, he's great. He's been around for a long time and he knows what to look out for. It just wasn't a fair start." Stockwell's teammate [Peter Evans], not in this event, was furious, telling him, "You were robbed, mate."

The starter had been Panamanian Frank Silvestri who had done similar duty at the 1982 World Championships and 1983 Pan American Games, and the American coaches knew of him. They knew he was quick on the trigger for the start and had warned Gaines to be ready. Anticipating that Gaines had an early lead and hung on in the final 25 metres, telling himself, '€œI can't stop now, this is my last 25 ever.'€ In the end the Australian protest was disallowed and Gaines won the gold medal with Stockwell taking silver. Gaines' time of 49.80 broke the Olympic record set in 1976 by [Jim Montgomery], which was the first time the 50-second barrier had been broken.

The final of the men's 100 metre freestyle event at the 1984 Summer Olympics was held in the McDonald's Olympic Swim Stadium in Los Angeles, California, on July 31, 1984. The fastest eight qualified for the final, the next eight for the B-final.

Mark Stockwell protested after the race saying Rowdy Gaines false started and that the officials let the race continue. However FINA (the governing body of aquatic sports) overruled the protest and allowed the results to stay the same.

 

Records

Prior to this competition, the existing world and Olympic records were as follows.

World record  Rowdy Gaines (USA) 49.36 Austin, United States 3 April 1981
Olympic record  Jim Montgomery (USA) 49.99 Montreal, Canada 25 July 1976

The following records were established during the competition:

DateRoundNameNationTimeRecord
31 July Final A Rowdy Gaines  United States 49.80 OR
 

Finals

 

Final A

RankLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
1st, gold medalist(s) 3 Rowdy Gaines  United States 49.80 OR
2nd, silver medalist(s) 4 Mark Stockwell  Australia 50.24 OC
3rd, bronze medalist(s) 6 Per Johansson  Sweden 50.31  
4 5 Mike Heath  United States 50.41  
5 2 Dano Halsall  Switzerland 50.50 NR
6 7 Alberto Mestre  Venezuela 50.70 NR
8 Stéphan Caron  France NR
8 1 Dirk Korthals  West Germany 50.93  
 

Final B

RankLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
9 7 Ang Peng Siong  Singapore 51.09 NR
10 3 Stéfan Voléry  Switzerland 51.42  
11 1 David Lowe  Great Britain 51.48  
12 8 Fabrizio Rampazzo  Italy 51.56  
13 4 Hans Kroes  Netherlands 51.64  
5 Thomas Lejdström  Sweden  
15 6 Edsard Schlingemann  Netherlands 51.74  
16 2 Peter Rohde  Denmark 51.98  

Heats

Rule: The eight fastest swimmers advance to final A (Q), while the next eight to final B (q).
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
6 1 4 Alberto Mestre  Venezuela 50.99 Q
21 1 3 Paul Easter  Great Britain 51.83  
25 1 5 Alexander Pilhatsch  Austria 52.25  
36 1 6 Li Khai-kam  Hong Kong 53.48  
42 1 2 Oon Jin Gee  Singapore 54.17  
55 1 7 Ingi Jónsson  Iceland 56.31  
67 1 1 Rami Kantari  Lebanon 1:01.96  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
7 2 3 Dirk Korthals  West Germany 51.02 Q
12 2 4 Stéfan Voléry  Switzerland 51.24 q
24 2 5 Franz Mortensen  Denmark 52.22  
39 2 6 Satoshi Sumida  Japan 53.83  
45 2 7 William Wilson  Philippines 54.63  
51 2 2 Evert Johan Kroon  Netherlands Antilles 55.20  
66 2 1 Percy Sayegh  Lebanon 1:01.88  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
8 3 4 Stéphan Caron  France 51.13 Q
15 3 3 Ang Peng Siong  Singapore 51.66 q
18 3 5 Cyro Delgado  Brazil 51.74  
27 3 6 Antonio Portela  Portugal 52.47 NR
40 3 2 Hilton Woods  Netherlands Antilles 53.92  
47 3 7 Erik Rosskopf  Virgin Islands 54.80  
58 3 1 Rodrigo Leal  Guatemala 56.80  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
11 4 4 Michael Delany  Australia 51.22 q, WD
16 4 3 David Lowe  Great Britain 51.68 q
28 4 5 Ronald Menezes  Brazil 52.49  
30 4 2 Michael Miao  Chinese Taipei 52.76 NR
33 4 6 Shigeo Ogata  Japan 52.96 NR
53 4 7 Collier Woolard  Virgin Islands 55.67  
60 4 1 Ernesto-José Degenhart  Guatemala 57.20  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
4 5 3 Per Johansson  Sweden 50.57 Q
29 5 5 Blair Hicken  Canada 52.74  
31 5 6 Mu Lati  Canada 52.82  
37 5 4 Sean Nottage  Bahamas 53.66  
43 5 2 Gökhan Attaroğlu  Turkey 54.22  
50 5 7 Ahmed Said  Egypt 55.01  
54 5 1 Samuela Tupou  Fiji 55.85  
64 5 8 Rodolfo Torres  Honduras 1:00.92  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
1 6 4 Mark Stockwell  Australia 50.27 Q
5 6 3 Dano Halsall  Switzerland 50.91 Q
14 6 5 Peter Rohde  Denmark 51.40 q, NR
23 6 6 Ramiro Estrada  Mexico 52.07  
35 6 2 Kemal Sadri Özün  Turkey 53.39  
49 6 7 Anthony Nesty  Suriname 54.99  
59 6 1 Khaled Al-Assaf  Kuwait 56.91  
65 6 8 Domingos Chivavele  Mozambique 1:01.38  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
9 7 5 Hans Kroes  Netherlands 51.19 q
19 7 4 Fernando Cañales  Puerto Rico 51.75  
20 7 3 Alexander Schowtka  West Germany 51.78  
44 7 2 Fernando Rodríguez  Peru 54.61  
48 7 7 César Sánchez  Mexico 54.94  
52 7 6 Gordon Scarlett  Jamaica 55.34  
56 7 1 Jean-Luc Adomo  Monaco 56.38  
62 7 8 Trevor Ncala  Swaziland 58.22  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
3 8 4 Rowdy Gaines  United States 50.41 Q
13 8 3 Edsard Schlingemann  Netherlands 50.41 q
17 8 5 Fabrizio Rampazzo  Italy 51.71 q
26 8 6 Marco Colombo  Italy 52.34  
38 8 2 Fabián Ferrari  Argentina 53.69  
41 8 7 Lukman Niode  Indonesia 54.10  
57 8 1 Warren Sorby  Fiji 56.75  
61 8 8 Hamad Bader  Bahrain 58.16  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
2 9 4 Mike Heath  United States 50.39 Q
9 9 5 Thomas Lejdström  Sweden 51.19 q
22 9 3 David Churchill  Canada 51.85  
32 9 2 Shen Jianqiang  China 52.84  
34 9 3 Mohamed Youssef  Egypt 53.19 NR
45 9 6 Deryck Marks  Jamaica 54.63  
63 9 8 Michele Piva  San Marino 59.26  
68 9 1 Daniel Mulumba  Uganda 1:07.86  
 

Men's 200 metres Freestyle

 Host City: Los Angeles, United States
Venue(s): Olympic Swim Stadium, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California
Date Started: July 29, 1984
Date Finished: July 29, 1984

 Competitors 56from 36 nations

 

Summary

[Michael GrosŸ] had been European Swimmer of the Year in 1982-83, and would win that as well in 1984-86, and was the 1982 World Champion in this event. He also held the world record, setting that twice in 1983, and better it again in June 1984 with 1:47.55 in Munich. At 202 cm (6-7'½), with a huge wingspan, he was dubbed "The Albatross" and was expected to win this event easily. He led the preliminary round with 1:48.03, but slowed dramatically in the final 100, and some wondered if perhaps he was not at his strongest. But that had simply been GrosŸ saving himself for the final. American [Mike Heath] was close at 50 metres but that was it. GrosŸ pulled away on each lap to win in 1:47.44, a new world record, and well ahead of Heath in second, with GrosŸ's teammate [Thomas Fahrner] taking bronze, despite a fast finish that almost caught Heath.

 The final of the men's 200 metre freestyle event at the 1984 Summer Olympics was held in the McDonald's Olympic Swim Stadium in Los Angeles, California, on July 29, 1984. The first eight qualified for the final, the next eight for the B-final.
 

Records

Prior to this competition, the existing world and Olympic records were as follows.

World record  Michael Gross (FRG) 1:47.55 Munich, West Germany 8 June 1984
Olympic record  Sergey Koplyakov (URS) 1:49.81 Moscow, Soviet Union 21 July 1980

The following records were established during the competition:

DateRoundNameNationTimeRecord
29 July Heat 7 Michael Gross  West Germany 1:48.03 OR
29 July Final A Michael Gross  West Germany 1:47.44 WR
 

Final A

RankLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
1st, gold medalist(s) 4 Michael Gross  West Germany 1:47.44 WR
2nd, silver medalist(s) 5 Mike Heath  United States 1:49.10  
3rd, bronze medalist(s) 3 Thomas Fahrner  West Germany 1:49.69  
4 2 Jeff Float  United States 1:50.18  
5 6 Alberto Mestre  Venezuela 1:50.23 NR
6 7 Frank Drost  Netherlands 1:51.62  
7 8 Marco Dell'Uomo  Italy 1:52.20  
8 1 Peter Dale  Australia 1:53.84  
 

Final B

RankLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
9 3 Paul Easter  Great Britain 1:51.70  
10 6 Juan Carlos Vallejo  Spain 1:51.77 NR
11 7 Hans Kroes  Netherlands 1:52.36  
12 4 Anders Holmertz  Sweden 1:52.44  
13 8 Carlos Scanavino  Uruguay 1:52.54  
14 1 Peter Szmidt  Canada 1:52.56  
15 2 Andrew Astbury  Great Britain 1:53.02  
16 5 Thomas Lejdström  Sweden 1:53.63  

Heats

Rule: The eight fastest swimmers advance to final A (Q), while the next eight to final B (q).
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
7 1 5 Peter Dale  Australia 1:51.42 Q, NR
16 1 4 Peter Szmidt  Canada 1:52.48 q
23 1 6 Franz Mortensen  Denmark 1:54.09 NR
25 1 2 Stéfan Voléry  Switzerland 1:54.19 NR
27 1 7 Michael Miao  Chinese Taipei 1:55.01 NR
30 1 3 Darjan Petrič  Yugoslavia 1:55.68  
51 1 1 Rodrigo Leal  Guatemala 2:05.96  
52 1 8 Juan José Piro  Honduras 2:12.51  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
12 2 3 Paul Easter  Great Britain 1:51.80 q
15 2 5 Hans Kroes  Netherlands 1:52.37 q
21 2 8 Cyro Delgado  Brazil 1:53.22  
22 2 4 Paolo Revelli  Italy 1:53.46  
33 2 6 Shigeo Ogata  Japan 1:55.97  
36 2 2 Thierry Jacot  Switzerland 1:56.54  
40 2 7 Sean Nottage  Bahamas 1:57.54  
46 2 1 Samuela Tupou  Fiji 2:02.22  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
4 3 4 Alberto Mestre  Venezuela 1:50.73 Q
14 3 5 Andrew Astbury  Great Britain 1:52.01 q
20 3 3 Jorge Fernandes  Brazil 1:53.03  
28 3 6 Javier Miralpeix  Spain 1:55.25  
32 3 2 Gökhan Attaroglu  Turkey 1:55.92  
39 3 7 William Wilson  Philippines 1:57.18  
49 3 1 Ng Wing Hon  Hong Kong 2:03.66  
53 3 8 Trevor Ncala  Swaziland 2:15.30  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
3 4 4 Thomas Fahrner  West Germany 1:50.00 Q
9 4 5 Anders Holmertz  Sweden 1:51.70 q
10 4 3 Alex Baumann  Canada 1:51.76 q, WD
31 4 7 César Sánchez  Mexico 1:55.82  
42 4 2 Carlos Romo  Mexico 1:58.77  
43 4 6 Fabián Ferrari  Argentina 1:59.39  
45 4 1 Erik Rosskopf  Virgin Islands 2:02.04  
54 4 8 Michele Piva  San Marino 2:15.39  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
5 5 4 Jeff Float  United States 1:50.95 Q
6 5 3 Frank Drost  Netherlands 1:51.32 Q, NR
13 5 6 Juan Carlos Vallejo  Spain 1:51.97 q, NR
18 5 5 Justin Lemberg  Australia 1:52.73  
35 5 2 Mike Davidson  New Zealand 1:56.20  
38 5 7 Evert Johan Kroon  Netherlands Antilles 1:57.05  
47 5 1 Ingi Jónsson  Iceland 2:02.23  
55 5 8 Percy Sayegh  Lebanon 2:20.76  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
2 6 4 Mike Heath  United States 1:49.87 Q
10 6 5 Thomas Lejdström  Sweden 1:51.76 q
17 6 3 Carlos Scanavino  Uruguay 1:52.70 q
24 6 2 Anthony Mosse  New Zealand 1:54.12 NR
29 6 6 Jean-Marie François  Venezuela 1:55.28  
41 6 7 Scott Newkirk  Virgin Islands 1:57.74  
48 6 1 Tsang Yi Ming  Hong Kong 2:03.11  
56 6 8 Rami Kantari  Lebanon 2:25.43  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
1 7 4 Michael Gross  West Germany 1:48.03 Q, OR
8 7 5 Marco Dell'Uomo  Italy 1:51.67 Q
19 7 5 Borut Petrič  Yugoslavia 1:52.74  
26 7 2 Hiroshi Sakamoto  Japan 1:54.71  
34 7 7 Shen Jianqiang  China 1:56.08  
37 7 6 Fernando Cañales  Puerto Rico 1:56.60  
44 7 1 Mohamed Youssef  Egypt 1:59.71  
50 7 8 Roberto Granados  Guatemala 2:05.21  
 

Men's 400 metres Freestyle

 Host City: Los Angeles, United States
Venue(s): Olympic Swim Stadium, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California
Date Started: August 2, 1984
Date Finished: August 2, 1984

 Competitors 37from 26 nations

Summary

The best 400 freestyler in the world was not in Los Angeles. That was [Vladimir Salnikov] of the USSR, defending champion in this event, 1978 and 1982 World Champion at both the 400 and 1,500, and a five-time world record in this event. Salnikov had swum 3:48.23 at Moscow in February 1983 for the current world mark as the Los Angeles Olympics opened. It was never challenged. The favorites in LA were American [George DiCarlo] and West German [Thomas Fahrner]. DiCarlo qualified comfortably in third place, as the leading morning qualifier was Fahrner'€™s teammate [Stefan Pfeiffer], followed by American [John Mykkanen], and DiCarlo. Fahrner wanted to save himself for the evening final and only aimed for a qualifying time that would put him in outside lane, but he misjudged the qualifying times, placed ninth, and did not make the final.

In the final DiCarlo and Mykkanen fought out a very close race, with DiCarlo winning gold in 3:51.23, nowhere near Salnikov'€™s times. Mykkanen won silver followed by Australian [Justin Lemberg] for the bronze. DiCarlo'€™s set an Olympic record, bettering Salnikov'€™s 3:51.31 from Moscow, but it did not last long. The B final started 10 minutes after the main final, and Thomas Fahrner elected to race. Putting everything he had into it, Fahrner finished in 3:50.91 to set the Olympic record, despite finishing 9th overall in the event. The officials from FINA initially considered not awarding the Olympic record to Fahrner, but quickly reversed themselves.

 The final of the men's 400 metre freestyle event at the 1984 Summer Olympics was held in the McDonald's Olympic Swim Stadium in Los Angeles, California, on August 2, 1984. The first eight qualified for the final, the next eight for the B-final.
 

Records

Prior to this competition, the existing world and Olympic records were as follows.

World record  Vladimir Salnikov (URS) 3:48.32 Moscow, Soviet Union 19 February 1983
Olympic record  Vladimir Salnikov (URS) 3:51.31 Moscow, Soviet Union 24 July 1980

The following records were established during the competition:

DateRoundNameNationTimeRecord
2 August Final B Thomas Fahrner  West Germany 3:50.91 OR
 

Final A

RankLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
1st, gold medalist(s) 3 George DiCarlo  United States 3:51.23  
2nd, silver medalist(s) 5 John Mykkanen  United States 3:51.49  
3rd, bronze medalist(s) 6 Justin Lemberg  Australia 3:51.79 OC
4 4 Stefan Pfeiffer  West Germany 3:52.91  
5 8 Franck Iacono  France 3:54.58 NR
6 2 Darjan Petrič  Yugoslavia 3:54.88  
7 7 Marco Dell'Uomo  Italy 3:55.44  
8 1 Ron McKeon  Australia 3:55.48  
 

Final B

RankLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
9 4 Thomas Fahrner  West Germany 3:50.91 OR
10 3 Juan Enrique Escalas  Spain 3:55.25  
11 5 Peter Szmidt  Canada 3:56.99  
12 6 Stefano Grandi  Italy 3:57.17  
13 7 Arne Borgstrøm  Norway 3:57.46  
14 8 Andrew Astbury  Great Britain 3:58.14  
15 2 Marcelo Jucá  Brazil 3:58.23  
16 1 Mike Davidson  New Zealand 3:58.24  
 

Heats

Rule: The eight fastest swimmers advance to final A (Q), while the next eight to final B (q)
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
1 1 4 Stefan Pfeiffer  West Germany 3:53.41 Q
6 1 5 Marco Dell'Uomo  Italy 3:55.00 Q, NR
12 1 3 Juan Enrique Escalas  Spain 3:55.93 q
24 1 6 Anders Holmertz  Sweden 4:03.67  
30 1 7 Franz Mortensen  Denmark 4:09.80  
32 1 2 Scott Newkirk  Virgin Islands 4:12.61  
33 1 1 Wu Ming-hsun  Chinese Taipei 4:13.11  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
4 2 4 Justin Lemberg  Australia 3:53.89 Q
13 2 3 Borut Petrič  Yugoslavia 3:56.07 q, WD
15 2 5 Marcelo Jucá  Brazil 3:57.43 q
19 2 6 David Shemilt  Canada 3:58.43  
20 2 7 Marc Van De Weghe  Belgium 4:00.01  
22 2 2 Shigeo Ogata  Japan 4:02.97  
34 2 1 Ahmet Nakkaş  Turkey 4:16.49  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
9 3 4 Thomas Fahrner  West Germany 3:55.26 q
10 3 6 Peter Szmidt  Canada 3:55.65 q
11 3 5 Carlos Scanavino  Uruguay 3:55.92 q, WD
18 3 3 Andrew Astbury  Great Britain 3:58.41 q
21 3 2 Anders Grillhammar  Sweden 4:00.26  
26 3 7 Alejandro Lecot  Argentina 4:05.74  
28 3 1 William Wilson  Philippines 4:06.86  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
2 4 4 John Mykkanen  United States 3:53.43 Q
5 4 5 Darjan Petrič  Yugoslavia 3:54.39 Q
7 4 3 Ron McKeon  Australia 3:55.06 Q
16 4 6 Mike Davidson  New Zealand 3:57.88 q
23 4 2 Jean-Marie François  Venezuela 4:03.08  
29 4 1 Gökhan Attaroglu  Turkey 4:07.07  
36 4 8 Julian Bolling  Sri Lanka 4:23.42  
  4 7 Fabián Ferrari  Argentina DNS  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
3 5 4 George DiCarlo  United States 3:53.44 Q
8 5 3 Franck Iacono  France 3:55.07 Q
14 5 6 Stefano Grandi  Italy 3:56.23 q
16 5 5 Arne Borgstrøm  Norway 3:57.88 q
25 5 6 Paul Howe  Great Britain 4:04.07  
27 5 1 Keisuke Okuno  Japan 4:06.31  
31 5 7 Evert Johan Kroon  Netherlands Antilles 4:11.97  
35 5 8 Lin Chun-hong  Chinese Taipei 4:20.65  
 

Men's 1,500 metres Freestyle

Host City: Los Angeles, United States
Venue(s): Olympic Swim Stadium, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California
Date Started: August 3, 1984
Date Finished: August 4, 1984 

 Competitors 28from 20 nations

Summary

Without [Vladimir Salnikov] this event seemed empty. The Soviet star was the defending champion, having broken the 15-minute barrier at the Moscow Olympics, and winning the 1978 and 1982 World Championship. He had bettered his world record in both 1982 and 1983 and was still the only swimmer to have bested 15 minutes. In his absence the race was expected to come down to the two Americans, [Mike O'Brien] and [George DiCarlo]. By 200 metres of the final they had pulled away from the pack. But DiCarlo found the water warmer than he liked and fell off the pace by 800 metres, leaving O'Brien in control. He would eventually win gold in 15:05.20, but DiCarlo did hang on for the silver medal, followed by West German [Stefan Pfeiffer] in third. A few weeks later Salnikov won the Friendship Games 1,500 in 15:03.51. O'Brien commented after his win, "Obviously 15:05 is a long way from 14:54. I think, though, that if he'd have been in the same pool swimming right next to me, I could've given him a good race." It's nice to think so.

 The final of the men's 1500 metre freestyle event at the 1984 Summer Olympics was held in the McDonald's Olympic Swim Stadium in Los Angeles, California, on August 4, 1984. The fastest eight qualified for the final.
 

Records

Prior to this competition, the existing world and Olympic records were as follows.

World record  Vladimir Salnikov (URS) 14:54.76 Moscow, Soviet Union 22 February 1983
Olympic record  Vladimir Salnikov (URS) 14:58.27 Moscow, Soviet Union 22 July 1980
 

Final

RankLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
1st, gold medalist(s) 4 Mike O'Brien  United States 15:05.20  
2nd, silver medalist(s) 6 George DiCarlo  United States 15:10.59  
3rd, bronze medalist(s) 5 Stefan Pfeiffer  West Germany 15:12.77 NR
4 2 Rainer Henkel  West Germany 15:20.03  
5 8 Franck Iacono  France 15:26.96 NR
6 3 Stefano Grandi  Italy 15:28.58  
7 7 David Shemilt  Canada 15:31.28  
8 1 Wayne Shillington  Australia 15:38.18  
 

Heats

Rule: The eight fastest swimmers advance to final A (Q)
 
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
9 1 5 Justin Lemberg  Australia 15:29.74  
11 1 4 Rafael Escalas  Spain 15:30.09  
13 1 2 Bernard Volz  Canada 15:31.38  
14 1 6 Mike Davidson  New Zealand 15:35.43  
17 1 3 Marcelo Jucá  Brazil 15:43.80  
25 1 7 Lin Chun-hong  Chinese Taipei 16:44.94  
27 1 1 Julian Bolling  Sri Lanka 17:16.92  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
2 2 4 Stefan Pfeiffer  West Germany 15:21.95 Q
8 2 6 Franck Iacono  France 15:27.27 Q
10 2 3 Carlos Scanavino  Uruguay 15:29.78 NR
15 2 5 Borut Petrič  Yugoslavia 15:36.44  
20 2 2 Alejandro Lecot  Argentina 15:49.94  
24 2 1 William Wilson  Philippines 16:24.81  
26 2 7 Scott Newkirk  Virgin Islands 16:50.55  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
1 3 4 Mike O'Brien  United States 15:21.04 Q
3 3 3 Stefano Grandi  Italy 15:22.49 Q, NR
7 3 6 Wayne Shillington  Australia 15:25.67 Q
16 3 5 Darjan Petrič  Yugoslavia 15:39.79  
21 3 7 Stuart Willmott  Great Britain 15:57.79  
22 3 2 Anders Holmertz  Sweden 16:11.38  
23 3 1 Wu Ming-hsun  Chinese Taipei 16:14.40  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
4 4 4 George DiCarlo  United States 15:22.88 Q
5 4 5 Rainer Henkel  West Germany 15:23.60 Q
6 4 2 David Shemilt  Canada 15:24.78 Q, NR
12 4 3 David Stacey  Great Britain 15:30.10  
18 4 6 Juan Enrique Escalas  Spain 15:44.85  
19 4 7 Marc Van De Weghe  Belgium 15:45.50  
  4 1 Ahmet Nakkaş  Turkey DNS  
 

Men's 4 x— 100 metres Freestyle Relay

 Host City: Los Angeles, United States
Venue(s): Olympic Swim Stadium, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California
Date Started: August 2, 1984
Date Finished: August 2, 1984

Competitors 99from 23 nations

Summary

It had been 1962 since the world records was held by a nation other than the United States. The current world mark was set by the US team that won the 1982 World Championships, and with this history, there was little reason to expect a different conclusion. In the heats the USA sent out there B team, and unlike in other years, when they were good enough to qualify first, this time they placed only second to move on to the final. The Americans won once again, and bettered their own world record with a time of 3:19.03. But it was close this time. Australia placed second, only .65 seconds behind the gold medalists. The American team led through the first three legs, but on the anchor, [Mark Stockwell] passed the US'€™s [Rowdy Gaines] just before the final turn, forcing Gaines to claw back with a strong second lap to secure the gold.

 The final of the men's 4 × 100 metre freestyle relay event at the 1984 Summer Olympics was held in Los Angeles, California, on August 2, 1984. The first eight teams qualified for the final.
 

Records

Prior to this competition, the existing world and Olympic records were as follows.

World record  United States (USA)
Chris Cavanaugh (50.13)
Robin Leamy (50.10)
David McCagg (49.89)
Rowdy Gaines (49.14)
3:19.26 Guayaquil, Ecuador 5 August 1982
Olympic record  United States (USA)
David Edgar (52.69)
John Murphy (52.04)
Jerry Heidenreich (50.78)
Mark Spitz (50.90)
3:26.42 Munich, West Germany 28 August 1972

The following new world and Olympic records were set during this competition.

DateEventNameNationalityTimeRecord
2 August Heat 3 Neil Brooks (50.36)
Greg Fasala (50.35)
Michael Delany (50.03)
Mark Stockwell (49.20)
 Australia 3:19.94 OR
2 August Final Chris Cavanaugh (50.83)
Mike Heath (49.60)
Matt Biondi (49.67)
Rowdy Gaines (48.93)
 United States 3:19.03 WR
 

Final

RankLaneNationSwimmersTimeNotes
1st, gold medalist(s) 5  United States Chris Cavanaugh (50.83)
Mike Heath (49.60)
Matt Biondi (49.67)
Rowdy Gaines (48.93)
3:19.03 WR
2nd, silver medalist(s) 4  Australia Greg Fasala (51.00)
Neil Brooks (49.36)
Michael Delany (50.26)
Mark Stockwell (49.06)
3:19.68 OC
3rd, bronze medalist(s) 3  Sweden Thomas Lejdström (51.29)
Bengt Baron (50.83)
Mikael Örn (51.28)
Per Johansson (49.29)
3:22.69 NR
4 7  West Germany Dirk Korthals (51.11)
Andreas Schmidt (51.48)
Alexander Schowtka (50.91)
Michael Gross (49.98)
3:22.98 NR
5 6  Great Britain David Lowe (51.38)
Roland Lee (51.17)
Paul Easter (50.82)
Richard Burrell (49.24)
3:23.61 NR
6 2  France Stéphan Caron (51.03)
Laurent Neuville (51.38)
Dominique Bataille (51.17)
Bruno Lesaffre (51.05)
3:24.63 NR
7 8  Canada David Churchill (51.73)
Blair Hicken (51.13)
Alex Baumann (51.28)
Sandy Goss (50.56)
3:24.70 NR
8 1  Italy Marcello Guarducci (51.53)
Marco Colombo (51.21)
Metello Savino (51.54)
Fabrizio Rampazzo (50.69)
3:24.97 NR
 

Heats

Rule: The eight fastest teams advance to the final (Q)
RankHeatLaneNationSwimmersTimeNotes
6 1 4  West Germany Dirk Korthals (51.31)
Alexander Schowtka (50.90)
Nicolai Klapkarek (51.27)
Michael Gross (51.21)
3:24.69 Q, NR
9 1 5  Switzerland Dano Halsall (51.68)
Stéfan Voléry (50.24)
Thierry Jacot (52.33)
Roger Birrer (52.36)
3:26.61  
12 1 3  Venezuela Alberto Mestre (51.18)
Alberto José Umana (53.13)
Rafael Vidal (53.15)
Jean-Marie François (52.78)
3:30.24  
15 1 6  China Mu Lat (52.21)
Feng Dawei (52.81)
Chen Qin (53.31)
Shen Jianqiang (52.49)
3:30.82  
16 1 2  Mexico José Medina (54.12)
Ramiro Estrada (52.39)
César Sánchez (54.05)
Carlos Romo (53.30)
3:33.86  
18 1 1  Jamaica Andrew Phillips (52.97)
Deryck Marks (54.44)
Allan Marsh (52.97)
Gordon Scarlett (54.49)
3:34.87  
20 1 7  Virgin Islands Erik Rosskopf (55.40)
Brian Farlow (57.77)
Collier Woolard (55.76)
Scott Newkirk (54.56)
3:43.49  
 
RankHeatLaneNationSwimmersTimeNotes
3 2 4  Sweden Rikard Milton (51.80)
Michael Söderlund (50.98)
Mikael Örn (50.89)
Per Johansson (50.19)
3:23.86 Q, NR
5 2 5  France Stéphan Caron (50.83)
Laurent Neuville (50.84)
Dominique Bataille (51.77)
Bruno Lesaffre (51.24)
3:24.68 Q, NR
10 2 1  Brazil Cyro Delgado (52.10)
Jorge Fernandes (51.39)
Djan Madruga (52.44)
Ronald Menezes (51.40)
3:27.33  
11 2 3  Netherlands Edsard Schlingemann (51.94)
Peter Drost (52.69)
Frank Drost (51.59)
Hans Kroes (51.38)
3:27.33  
13 2 2  Japan Hiroshi Sakamoto (52.31)
Shigeo Ogata (52.22)
Taihei Saka (52.85)
Satoshi Sumida (53.07)
3:30.45  
14 2 6  Puerto Rico Fernando Cañales (51.90)
Miguel Figueroa (53.63)
Antonio Portela (51.92)
Rafael Gandarillas (53.21)
3:30.66  
22 2 8  Honduras Salvador Corelo (58.20)
Juan José Piro (59.92)
David Palma (58.66)
Rodolfo Torres (59.09)
3:55.87  
  2 7  Egypt Mohamed Youssef (53.23)
Sharif Nour (55.36)
Ahmed Eid
Ahmed Said
DSQ  
RankHeatLaneNationSwimmersTimeNotes
1 3 5  Australia Neil Brooks (50.36)
Greg Fasala (50.35)
Michael Delany (50.03)
Mark Stockwell (49.20)
3:19.94 Q, OR
2 3 4  United States Matt Biondi (50.50)
Chris Cavanaugh (49.94)
Tom Jager (49.89)
Robin Leamy (49.81)
3:19.94 Q
4 3 6  Great Britain David Lowe (51.51)
Roland Lee (51.37)
Paul Easter (51.03)
Richard Burrell (50.68)
3:24.59 Q
7 3 8  Italy Marcello Guarducci (51.49)
Raffaele Franceschi (51.51)
Metello Savino (51.00)
Marco Colombo (51.37)
3:25.37 Q, NR
8 3 3  Canada Sandy Goss (51.82)
Alex Baumann (51.47)
Blair Hicken (51.23)
Levente Mady (51.75)
3:25.94 Q
17 3 2  Singapore Ang Peng Siong (51.18)
Oon Jin Teik (54.53)
David Lim Fong Jock (54.70)
Oon Jin Gee (54.22)
3:34.63  
19 3 7  Turkey Kemal Sabri Özün (53.50)
İhsan Sabri Özün (53.94)
Ahmed Nakkas (54.59)
Gökhan Attaroglu (54.51)
3:36.54  
21 3 1  Guatemala Rodrigo Leal (58.39)
Fernando Marroquin (58.39)
Roberto Granados (57.56)
Ernesto-José Degenhart (56.90)
3:52.18  
 

Men's 4 x— 200 metres Freestyle Relay

Host City: Los Angeles, United States
Venue(s): Olympic Swim Stadium, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California
Date Started: July 30, 1984
Date Finished: July 30, 1984 

 Competitors 62from 14 nations

Summary

The world record had been set in August 1983 by the West German team, and it was expected to be a very close final between the FRG and United States. Nobody could really envision how close, although Sports Illustrated's Craig Neff did call it, predicting in the Olympic Preview issue, "The West Germans will likely lose their world record and the gold medal to the U.S. '€“ but just barely." That record went in the heats as the US B team came home in 7:18.87 for a world record to qualify first.

US coach Don Gambril made the choice to lead off with America's best, [Mike Heath], and make the Germans catch up, as the German anchor would certainly be [Michael GrosŸ], probably the top male freestyler in Los Angeles. On the first leg Heath went ahead of [Thomas Fahrner], 1:48.67 to 1:49.83. On the next leg [David Larson] extended the lead to 2.87 seconds at 300 metres, but he had gone out too fast, and Dirk Korthals closed so that the US lead was only 9/10ths of a second by the exchange. The third US swimmer, [Jeff Float], also went out quickly and had 3 seconds on the Germans at 500 metres, but [Alexander Schowtka] reeled in Float on the second 100, with the margin 1.56 seconds as the anchor swimmers started their work.

GrosŸ anchored Germany, as expected, and he faced off against American [Bruce Hayes]. At the first turn of the anchor, GrosŸ had caught up, but Gambril later noted that '€œGrosŸ paid too much to catch Bruce that early.'€ For the next 100 they swam together, GrosŸ unable to shake Hayes, until Germany took a slight lead at the final turn. With 25 metres to go, Hayes had made that up and they swam together to the wall, nobody really knowing who had won, until the scoreboard showed that it was the United States '€“ 7:15.69 to 7:15.73 '€“ the closest relay in Olympic swimming history. The time was a world record by over three seconds.

GrosŸ was magnanimous in defeat, stating, '€œI simply did not have any more to give. We never expected to swim so fast in the relay, so we cannot be too disappointed.'€ His final leg of 1:46.89 was the fastest 200 split ever recorded at that time.

 The final of the men's 4 × 200 metre freestyle relay event at the 1984 Summer Olympics was held in Los Angeles, California, on July 30, 1984. The first eight teams qualified for the final.
 

Records

Prior to this competition, the existing world and Olympic records were as follows.

World record  West Germany (FRG)
Thomas Fahrner (1:51.13)
Alexander Schowtka (1:51.28)
Andreas Schmidt (1:50.78)
Michael Gross (1:47.21)
7:20.40 Rome, Italy 23 August 1983
Olympic record  United States (USA)
Mike Bruner (1:52.35)
Bruce Furniss (1:49.56)
John Naber (1:51.20)
Jim Montgomery (1:50.11)
7:23.22 Montreal, Canada 21 July 1976

The following new world and Olympic records were set during this competition.

DateEventNameNationalityTimeRecord
30 July Heat 1 Geoff Gaberino (1:49.80)
David Larson (1:50.18)
Bruce Hayes (1:50.04)
Richard Saeger (1:48.85)
 United States 7:18.87 OR
30 July Final Mike Heath (1:48.67)
David Larson (1:49.01)
Jeff Float (1:49.60)
Bruce Hayes (1:48.41)
 United States 7:15.69 WR
 

Final

RankLaneNationSwimmersTimeNotes
1st, gold medalist(s) 4  United States Mike Heath (1:48.67)
David Larson (1:49.01)
Jeff Float (1:49.60)
Bruce Hayes (1:48.41)
7:15.69 WR
2nd, silver medalist(s) 5  West Germany Thomas Fahrner (1:49.83)
Dirk Korthals (1:48.75)
Alexander Schowtka (1:50.26)
Michael Gross (1:46.89)
7:15.73 EU
3rd, bronze medalist(s) 3  Great Britain Neil Cochran (1:52.08)
Paul Easter (1:49.64)
Paul Howe (1:51.63)
Andrew Astbury (1:51.43)
7:24.78 NR
4 6  Australia Peter Dale (1:51.96)
Justin Lemberg (1:52.08)
Ron McKeon (1:50.52)
Graeme Brewer (1:51.07)
7:25.63 OC
5 7  Canada Sandy Goss (1:51.69)
Wayne Kelly (1:53.08)
Peter Szmidt (1:51.23)
Alex Baumann (1:50.51)
7:26.51 NR
6 1  Sweden Michael Söderlund (1:51.73)
Tommy Werner (1:51.79)
Anders Holmertz (1:51.33)
Thomas Lejdström (1:51.68)
7:26.63 NR
7 8  Netherlands Hans Kroes (1:51.84)
Peter Drost (1:52.77)
Edsard Schlingemann (1:51.42)
Frank Drost (1:50.69)
7:26.72 NR
8 2  France Stéphan Caron (1:50.99) NR
Dominique Bataille (1:52.49)
Michel Pou (1:53.41)
Pierre Andraca (1:53.27)
7:30.16  
 

Heats

Rule: The eight fastest teams advance to the final (Q)
 
RankHeatLaneNationSwimmersTimeNotes
1 1 4  United States Geoff Gaberino (1:49.80)
David Larson (1:50.18)
Bruce Hayes (1:50.04)
Richard Saeger (1:48.85)
7:18.87 Q, OR
3 1 5  Great Britain Neil Cochran (1:52.91)
Paul Easter (1:50.63)
Paul Howe (1:52.02)
Andrew Astbury (1:51.27)
7:26.83 Q, NR
5 1 6  France Pierre Andraca (1:53.13)
Dominique Bataille (1:51.42)
Michel Pou (1:52.74)
Stéphan Caron (1:50.11)
7:27.40 Q, NR
7 1 3  Sweden Michael Söderlund (1:51.95)
Tommy Werner (1:52.28)
Mikael Örn (1:53.01)
Anders Holmertz (1:51.36)
7:28.60 Q
8 1 2  Netherlands Hans Kroes (1:53.09)
Peter Drost (1:53.16)
Edsard Schlingemann (1:51.94)
Frank Drost (1:50.95)
7:29.14 Q, NR
9 1 1  Brazil Cyro Delgado (1:52.49)
Marcelo Jucá (1:53.08)
Djan Madruga (1:52.51)
Jorge Fernandes (1:52.33)
7:30.41 SA
  1 7  Japan Taihei Saka (1:54.79)
Hiroshi Sakamoto
Keisuke Okuno
Shigeo Ogata
DSQ  
RankHeatLaneNationSwimmersTimeNotes
2 2 4  West Germany Rainer Henkel (1:52.94)
Dirk Korthals (1:50.37)
Alexander Schowtka (1:50.82)
Thomas Fahrner (1:51.16)
7:25.29 Q
4 2 6  Australia Justin Lemberg (1:52.65)
Ron McKeon (1:51.04)
Tom Stachewicz (1:52.61)
Graeme Brewer (1:50.63)
7:26.93 Q, OC
6 2 2  Canada Sandy Goss (1:52.15)
Benoit Clément (1:52.51)
Wayne Kelly (1:52.08)
Peter Szmidt (1:51.57)
7:28.31 Q, NR
10 2 6  Venezuela Jean-Marie François (1:53.75)
Alberto José Umana (1:55.66)
Rafael Vidal (1:51.91)
Alberto Mestre (1:50.47)
7:31.79 NR
11 2 7  Spain Juan Enrique Escalas (1:52.76)
Rafael Escalas (1:54.47)
Juan Carlos Vallejo (1:51.59)
David López-Zubero (1:53.39)
7:32.21  
12 2 1  Turkey Gökhan Attaroğlu (1:56.01)
Kemal Sabri Özün (2:00.93)
Ahmed Nakkaş (1:59.45)
İhsan Sabri Özün (2:02.97)
7:59.36 NR
  2 5  Italy Marco Colombo (1:53.38)
Marcello Guarducci
Fabrizio Rampazzo
Marco Dell'Uomo
DSQ  
 

Men's 100 metres Backstroke

 Host City: Los Angeles, United States
Venue(s): Olympic Swim Stadium, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California
Date Started: August 3, 1984
Date Finished: August 3, 1984

 Competitors 49from 34 nations

Summary

At the 1982 World Championships [Dirk Richter] (GDR) had won in a close battle over American [Rick Carey], but in 1983 Carey moved well ahead in this event, setting three world records. In Richter's absence, Carey was heavily favored in Los Angeles. He came through, winning in 55.79 although it off his world record time of 55.19. Carey had already won the 200 back in LA, and had pouted on the victory podium, upset with his winning time. It earned him boos from the crowd and the media did not portray him kindly, calling him a sore winner. This time he smiled and acted more appreciative of the gold. Behind him [Dave Wilson] of the US won silver and [Mike West] of Canada took bronze.

The fourth spot went to New Zealand's [Gary Hurring] who was hoping to become New Zealand's first Olympic swimming medalist since his mother, [Jean Stewart], won a bronze in the 100 back for women in 1952. From a line of backstroke swimmers, Hurring's father, [Lincoln], also swam the 100 back at the 1952 (and 1956) Olympics. A few weeks after the Olympics, Dirk Richter won the Friendship Games 100 back in 55.67.

 The final of the men's 100 metre backstroke event at the 1984 Summer Olympics was held in the McDonald's Olympic Swim Stadium in Los Angeles, California, on August 3, 1984
 

Records

Prior to this competition, the existing world and Olympic records were as follows.

World record  Rick Carey (USA) 55.19 Caracas, Venezuela 21 August 1983
Olympic record  John Naber (USA) 55.49 Montreal, Canada 19 July 1976
 

Final A

RankLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
1st, gold medalist(s) 4 Rick Carey  United States 55.79  
2nd, silver medalist(s) 5 Dave Wilson  United States 56.35  
3rd, bronze medalist(s) 8 Mike West  Canada 56.49  
4 6 Gary Hurring  New Zealand 56.90 NR
5 3 Mark Kerry  Australia 57.18  
6 1 Bengt Baron  Sweden 57.34  
7 7 Sandy Goss  Canada 57.46  
8 2 Hans Kroes  Netherlands 58.07  
 

Final B

RankLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
9 7 David Orbell  Australia 58.05  
10 2 Paul Kingsman  New Zealand 58.19  
11 1 Daichi Suzuki  Japan 58.30  
5 Stefan Peter  West Germany  
13 4 Ricardo Aldabe  Spain 58.31  
8 Hans Fredin  Sweden  
15 3 Nicolai Klapkarek  West Germany 58.56  
  6 Frédéric Delcourt  France DSQ  
 

Heats

Rule: The eight fastest swimmers advance to final A (Q), while the next eight to final B (q).
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
14 1 4 David Orbell  Australia 58.35 q
25 1 5 Giovanni Frigo  Venezuela 59.34  
39 1 7 Ernesto-José Degenhart  Guatemala 1:05.63  
43 1 1 David Palma  Honduras 1:13.28  
  1 2 Kemal Sadri Özün  Turkey DNS  
  1 3 Andrew Phillips  Jamaica DNS  
  1 6 Daniel Mulumba  Uganda DNS  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
3 2 5 Mark Kerry  Australia 57.15 Q
5 2 4 Hans Kroes  Netherlands 57.48 Q
20 2 3 Kristofer Stivenson  Greece 58.76  
27 2 6 Allan Marsh  Jamaica 1:00.04  
36 2 7 Hugo Goossen  Suriname 1:03.77  
38 2 1 Salvador Salguero  El Salvador 1:04.99  
  2 2 Alexander Pilhatsch  Austria DNS  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
6 3 4 Sandy Goss  Canada 57.60 Q
17 3 5 Neil Harper  Great Britain 58.50  
22 3 6 Patrick Ferland  Switzerland 58.78  
26 3 3 Sharif Nour  Egypt 59.63  
29 3 2 David Lim Fong Jock  Singapore 1:00.65  
33 3 7 Emad El-Shafei  Egypt 1:02.04  
44 3 1 Ibrahim El-Baba  Lebanon 1:13.76  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
7 4 4 Bengt Baron  Sweden 57.66 Q
11 4 3 Nicolai Klapkarek  West Germany 58.19 q
12 4 6 Frédéric Delcourt  France 58.22 q
13 4 5 Paul Kingsman  New Zealand 58.33 q
21 4 2 Lukman Niode  Indonesia 58.77  
32 4 7 Ernesto Vela  Mexico 1:01.42  
  4 1 Rami Kantari  Lebanon DSQ  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
4 5 5 Gary Hurring  New Zealand 57.42 Q
8 5 4 Mike West  Canada 57.76 Q
15 5 3 Daichi Suzuki  Japan 58.37 q
18 5 2 Paolo Falchini  Italy 58.65  
23 5 6 Wang Hao  China 59.13  
37 5 7 Erik Rosskopf  Virgin Islands 1:03.82  
42 5 1 Joaquim Cruz  Mozambique 1:10.86  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
2 6 4 Dave Wilson  United States 56.71 Q
16 6 5 Hans Fredin  Sweden 58.39 q
19 6 3 Ilias Malamas  Greece 58.69  
24 6 2 Fabrizio Bortolon  Italy 59.27  
28 6 6 Ian Collins  Great Britain 1:00.08  
34 6 7 Fernando Rodríguez  Peru 1:02.27  
41 6 1 Collier Woolard  Virgin Islands 1:06.86  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
1 7 4 Rick Carey  United States 55.74 Q
9 7 3 Ricardo Aldabe  Spain 57.90 q
9 7 5 Stefan Peter  West Germany 57.90 q
30 7 2 Li Zhongyi  China 1:00.66  
31 7 6 David Morley  Bahamas 1:01.29  
35 7 7 Alejandro Alvizuri  Peru 1:02.63  
40 7 1 Warren Sorby  Fiji 1:05.81  
 

Men's 200 metres Backstroke

 Host City: Los Angeles, United States
Venue(s): Olympic Swim Stadium, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California
Date Started: July 31, 1984
Date Finished: July 31, 1984

 Competitors 37from 26 nations

Summary

In 1982 [Rick Carey] had won the World Championships in this event and in 1983, he bettered [John Naber]'s vaunted world record from the Montreal Olympics. He improved that at the 1984 US Olympic Trials with 1:58.86 and was the clear favorite for gold in the 200 back. In the heats he bettered Naber's Olympic record, finishing in 1:58.99 and hoped to improve in the final and set another world record. He won quite easily, finishing 1'½ seconds ahead of France's [Frederic Delcourt], but his time was disappointing to him '€“ 2:00.23. Rather than celebrate he pouted on the medal podium, did not smile, and acted like a spoiled child. Not acknowledging them, the pro-American crowd responded with a chorus of boos, and the press went after him. In his post-race interview, he said, "I would have won no matter what. I didn't feel good but no one can beat me. That's not vanity or cockiness. I had control of the race al all times, feeling as bad as I did."

Carey was so harshly criticized that he had to offer a formal apology. A few days later he came back to win the 100 backstroke and this time smiled, and let everyone know he was happy. He would also win a third gold medal in Los Angeles in the medley relay. A few weeks after the Olympics, [Sergey Zabolotnov] of the Soviet Union broke Carey's world record at the Friendship Games.

 The final of the men's 200 metre backstroke event at the 1984 Summer Olympics was held in the McDonald's Olympic Swim Stadium in Los Angeles, California, on July 31, 1984. The first eight qualified for the final, the next for the B-final.
 

Records

Prior to this competition, the existing world and Olympic records were as follows.

World record  Rick Carey (USA) 1:58.86 Indianapolis, United States 27 June 1984
Olympic record  John Naber (USA) 1:59.19 Montreal, Canada 24 July 1976

The following records were established during the competition:

DateRoundNameNationTimeRecord
31 July Heat 5 Rick Carey  United States 1:58.99 OR
 

Final A

RankLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
1st, gold medalist(s) 4 Rick Carey  United States 2:00.23  
2nd, silver medalist(s) 5 Frédéric Delcourt  France 2:01.75 NR
3rd, bronze medalist(s) 6 Cameron Henning  Canada 2:02.37  
4 8 Ricardo Prado  Brazil 2:03.05  
5 3 Gary Hurring  New Zealand 2:03.10 NR
6 1 Nicolai Klapkarek  West Germany 2:03.95  
7 2 Ricardo Aldabe  Spain 2:04.53  
8 7 David Orbell  Australia 2:04.67  

Final B

RankLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
9 4 Paolo Falchini  Italy 2:04.64  
10 5 Mike West  Canada 2:04.73  
11 7 Michael Söderlund  Sweden 2:05.02  
12 6 Djan Madruga  Brazil 2:05.33  
13 3 Stefan Peter  West Germany 2:05.66  
14 2 Neil Cochran  Great Britain 2:05.72  
15 8 Fabrizio Bortolon  Italy 2:05.86  
16 1 Daichi Suzuki  Japan 2:06.02  

Heats

Rule: The eight fastest swimmers advance to final A (Q), while the next eight to final B (q)

Heats

Rule: The eight fastest swimmers advance to final A (Q), while the next eight to final B (q).

RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
8 1 4 Ricardo Prado  Brazil 2:04.46 Q
16 1 6 Daichi Suzuki  Japan 2:06.24 q
18 1 3 Hans Fredin  Sweden 2:06.50  
20 1 5 Paul Kingsman  New Zealand 2:06.87  
23 1 2 Kristofer Stivenson  Greece 2:08.38 NR
30 1 7 Alejandro Alvizuri  Peru 2:13.30  
33 1 1 Ernesto José Degenhart  Guatemala 2:24.08  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
4 2 4 Cameron Henning  Canada 2:03.36 Q
5 2 2 Ricardo Aldabe  Spain 2:03.94 Q
7 2 5 Nicolai Klapkarek  West Germany 2:04.45 Q
12 2 3 Stefan Peter  West Germany 2:05.22 q
13 2 6 Djan Madruga  Brazil 2:05.23 q
31 2 7 David Morley  Bahamas 2:18.87  
  2 1 Ng Wing Hon  Hong Kong DNS  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
6 3 5 David Orbell  Australia 2:04.00 Q
9 3 4 Jesse Vassallo  United States 2:04.51 q, WD
10 3 3 Paolo Falchini  Italy 2:04.59 q, NR
17 3 6 Fabrizio Bortolon  Italy 2:06.46 q
21 3 2 Giovanni Frigo  Venezuela 2:07.56 NR
27 3 7 Allan Marsh  Jamaica 2:11.57  
34 3 8 Juan José Piro  Honduras 2:32.48  
  3 1 Sharif Nour  Egypt DNS  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
3 4 5 Gary Hurring  New Zealand 2:03.29 Q
11 4 4 Mike West  Canada 2:04.93 q
14 4 6 Neil Cochran  Great Britain 2:05.58 q
15 4 3 Michael Söderlund  Sweden 2:05.85 q
22 4 2 Patrick Ferland  Switzerland 2:08.31 NR
26 4 7 Ernesto Vela  Mexico 2:10.30  
29 4 1 Emad El-Shafei  Egypt 2:12.90  
32 4 8 Salvador Salguero  El Salvador 2:21.75  
 
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
1 5 4 Rick Carey  United States 1:58.99 Q, OR
2 5 5 Frédéric Delcourt  France 2:02.59 Q
19 5 3 Kim Terrell  Australia 2:06.56  
24 5 6 Neil Harper  Great Britain 2:09.48  
25 5 1 Lukman Niode  Indonesia 2:09.79  
28 5 2 Wang Hao  China 2:12.28  
  5 7 Ilias Malamas  Greece DNS  
  5 8 Gordon Petersen  Fiji DNS  
 

Men's 100 metres Breaststroke

 Host City: Los Angeles, United States
Venue(s): Olympic Swim Stadium, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California
Date Started: July 29, 1984
Date Finished: July 29, 1984

 Competitors 52from 37 nations

Summary

In 1982-83 [Steve Lundquist] had been the world'€™s best in this event, winning gold at the 1982 World Championships and setting four world records in those years. At the 1982 Worlds, American [John Moffet] had won bronze in both breaststroke events. At the 1984 US Olympic Trials, Moffett beat Lundquist for the first time and in the process, bettered his world record with 1:02.13. In training camp before the Olympics, however, Moffet injured his groin. It seemed better by the time of Los Angeles, as Moffet led the qualifiers with 1:02.16, but on the turn of that race, re-injured his groin. It was not certain if he would be able to even swim in the final. And he told Lundquist, '€œIf something goes haywire with my leg, get the gold for the United States.'€ Lundquist did just that, finishing in a world record 1:01.65, the first swimmer to better 1:02 in the 100 breast, although Canada'€™s [Victor Davis] also did so in second, with 1:01.99. Four days later, he would win the 200 breaststroke. Moffet was far from his best and trailed in fifth, swimming with his upper thigh taped and having received a pain-killing injection. The winner of the Friendship Games a few weeks later was Soviet Dmitry Volkov, who swam 1:03.72.

 The final of the men's 100 metre breaststroke event at the 1984 Summer Olympics was held in the McDonald's Olympic Swim Stadium in Los Angeles, California, on July 29, 1984. The first eight qualified for the final, the next eight for the B-final.
 

Records

Prior to this competition, the existing world and Olympic records were as follows.

World record  John Moffet (USA) 1:02.13 Indianapolis, United States 25 June 1984
Olympic record  John Hencken (USA) 1:03.11 Montreal, Canada 20 July 1976

The following records were established during the competition:

DateRoundNameNationTimeRecord
29 July Heat 7 John Moffet  United States 1:02.16 OR
29 July Final A Steve Lundquist  United States 1:01.65 WR
 

Final A

RankLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
1st, gold medalist(s) 2 Steve Lundquist  United States 1:01.65 WR
2nd, silver medalist(s) 7 Victor Davis  Canada 1:01.99 NR
3rd, bronze medalist(s) 5 Peter Evans  Australia 1:02.97  
4 1 Adrian Moorhouse  Great Britain 1:03.25  
5 4 John Moffet  United States 1:03.29  
6 3 Brett Stocks  Australia 1:03.49  
7 6 Gerald Mörken  West Germany 1:03.95  
8 8 Raffaele Avagnano  Italy 1:04.11  
 

Final B

RankLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
9 4 Gianni Minervini  Italy 1:03.99  
10 2 Shigehiro Takahashi  Japan 1:04.41  
11 5 Peter Lang  West Germany 1:04.43  
12 3 Pablo Restrepo  Colombia 1:04.79  
13 6 Thomas Böhm  Austria 1:04.99  
14 7 Iain Campbell  Great Britain 1:05.02  
15 1 Brett Austin  New Zealand 1:05.49  
16 8 Peter Berggren  Sweden 1:05.66  
 

Heats

Rule: The eight fastest swimmers advance to final A (Q), while the next eight to final B (q).

RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
10 1 4 Peter Lang  West Germany 1:04.40 q
12 1 3 Thomas Böhm  Austria 1:04.60 q, NR
19 1 5 Marco Veilleux  Canada 1:05.34  
24 1 2 Victor Ruberry  Bermuda 1:05.96 NR
33 1 7 Tryggvi Helgason  Iceland 1:07.71 NR
34 1 6 Julio César Falón  Argentina 1:07.80  
48 1 1 Michele Piva  San Marino 1:16.21  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
2 2 4 Peter Evans  Australia 1:02.87 Q, OC
8 2 5 Raffaele Avagnano  Italy 1:04.09 Q
18 2 3 Enrique Romero  Spain 1:05.19 NR
23 2 6 Felix Morf  Switzerland 1:05.89  
37 2 2 Watt Kam Sing  Hong Kong 1:08.07  
43 2 7 Ayman Nadim  Egypt 1:09.51  
47 2 1 Ahmad Al-Hahdoud  Kuwait 1:13.01  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
7 3 4 Adrian Moorhouse  Great Britain 1:04.06 Q
9 3 5 Gianni Minervini  Italy 1:04.37 q
16 3 3 Peter Berggren  Sweden 1:04.95 q
22 3 6 Eyal Stigman  Israel 1:05.63 NR
26 3 2 Manuel Gutiérrez  Panama 1:06.07  
41 3 7 Oscar Ortigosa  Peru 1:09.07  
46 3 1 Brian Farlow  Virgin Islands 1:11.27  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
6 4 4 Victor Davis  Canada 1:03.63 Q
15 4 3 Brett Austin  New Zealand 1:04.83 q, NR
20 4 5 Étienne Dagon  Switzerland 1:05.37  
21 4 6 Jan-Erick Olsen  Norway 1:05.43 NR
34 4 6 Alexandre Yokochi  Portugal 1:07.80  
40 4 7 Jorge Henao  Venezuela 1:09.01  
45 4 1 Harrell Woolard  Virgin Islands 1:11.17  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
3 5 5 Brett Stocks  Australia 1:03.46 Q
4 5 4 Gerald Mörken  West Germany 1:03.53 Q
27 5 6 Kenji Watanabe  Japan 1:06.10  
28 5 3 Paul Newallo  Trinidad and Tobago 1:06.12 NR
31 5 2 Eduardo Morillo  Mexico 1:06.82  
39 5 7 Li Khai Kam  Hong Kong 1:08.75  
44 5 1 Fernando Marroquin  Guatemala 1:09.73  
  5 8 Salvador Corelo  Honduras DSQ  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
5 6 4 Steve Lundquist  United States 1:03.55 Q
11 6 5 Pablo Restrepo  Colombia 1:04.44 q
24 6 6 Luiz Carvalho  Brazil 1:05.96  
29 6 3 Martti Järventaus  Finland 1:06.21  
36 6 7 Jairulla Jaitulla  Philippines 1:08.00  
42 6 1 Oon Jin Teik  Singapore 1:09.23  
50 6 8 Amine El-Domyati  Lebanon 1:19.10  
  6 2 Wang Lin  China DSQ  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
1 7 4 John Moffet  United States 1:02.16 Q, OR
13 7 5 Shigehiro Takahashi  Japan 1:04.71 q
14 7 3 Iain Campbell  Great Britain 1:04.81 q
17 7 2 Jin Fu  China 1:05.05  
30 7 6 Gerhard Prohaska  Austria 1:06.41  
32 7 7 Francisco Guanco  Philippines 1:07.55  
38 7 1 Árni Sigurðsson  Iceland 1:08.52  
49 7 8 Isaac Atish Wa-El  Kuwait 1:16.51  
 

Men's 200 metres Breaststroke

 Host City: Los Angeles, United States
Venue(s): Olympic Swim Stadium, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California
Date Started: August 2, 1984
Date Finished: August 2, 1984

 Competitors 49from 35 nations

Summary

Canadian [Victor Davis] had been world's best in this event since 1982, when he won the World Championships in Ecuador in world record time. He bettered that mark at the 1984 Canadian Olympic Trials in Etobicoke, Ontario. The final was a coronation for him, and was '¼-second ahead at 50 metres, increasing the lead on every lap. He finished in 2:13.34, over one second ahead of his world record, and almost 2'½ seconds ahead of silver medalist [Glenn Beringen] of Australia. The bronze went to Swiss swimmer [E‰tienne Dagon] as the US men swimmers were shut out of the medals for one of only three events on the Los Angeles swimming program (also the 200 fly and 400 IM).

In November 1989 Davis was killed when struck by a car outside a Montreal bar. His ashes were placed in quart of water from lane five of the Olympic pool, where he had won his gold medal, and they were then cast into the sea.

 The final of the men's 200 metre breaststroke event at the 1984 Summer Olympics was held in the McDonald's Olympic Swim Stadium in Los Angeles, California, on August 2, 1984. The first eight qualified for the final, the next eight for the B-final.
 

Records

Prior to this competition, the existing world and Olympic records were as follows.

World record  Victor Davis (CAN) 2:14.58 Etobicoke, Canada 17 June 1984
Olympic record  David Wilkie (GBR) 2:15.11 Montreal, Canada 24 July 1976

The following records were established during the competition:

DateRoundNameNationTimeRecord
2 August Final A Victor Davis  Canada 2:13.34 WR
 

Final A

RankLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
1st, gold medalist(s) 5 Victor Davis  Canada 2:13.34 WR
2nd, silver medalist(s) 4 Glenn Beringen  Australia 2:15.79 OC
3rd, bronze medalist(s) 6 Étienne Dagon  Switzerland 2:17.41 NR
4 2 Richard Schroeder  United States 2:18.03  
5 7 Ken Fitzpatrick  Canada 2:18.86  
6 8 Pablo Restrepo  Colombia 2:18.96 NR
7 1 Alexandre Yokochi  Portugal 2:20.69  
  3 Marco Del Prete  Italy DSQ  
 

Final B

RankLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
9 4 Adrian Moorhouse  Great Britain 2:18.83  
10 3 Thierry Pata  France 2:20.05 NR
11 6 Iain Campbell  Great Britain 2:20.62  
12 5 Shigehiro Takahashi  Japan 2:20.93  
13 2 Enrique Romero  Spain 2:21.19  
14 7 Thomas Böhm  Austria 2:22.09  
15 1 Kenji Watanabe  Japan 2:22.29  
16 8 Manuel Gutiérrez  Panama 2:23.13  
 

Heats

Rule: The eight fastest swimmers advance to final A (Q), while the next eight to final B (q).

RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
6 1 5 Ken Fitzpatrick  Canada 2:19.74 Q
13 1 4 Peter Evans  Australia 2:21.21 q, WD
20 1 3 Eduardo Morillo  Mexico 2:23.72  
27 1 2 Martti Järventaus  Finland 2:26.96  
30 1 6 Gerhard Prohaska  Austria 2:27.85  
42 1 1 David Palma  Honduras 2:37.65  
43 1 7 Brian Farlow  Virgin Islands 2:37.87  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
10 2 4 Shigehiro Takahashi  Japan 2:19.98 q
19 2 6 Manuel Gutiérrez  Panama 2:23.02 q
21 2 5 Christophe Deneuville  France 2:24.54  
24 2 3 Jan-Erick Olsen  Norway 2:25.75  
25 2 2 Francisco Guanco  Philippines 2:26.12  
  2 1 Luiz Carvalho  Brazil DSQ  
  2 7 Árni Sigurðsson  Iceland DSQ  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
3 3 5 Marco Del Prete  Italy 2:18.90 Q, NR
12 3 3 Iain Campbell  Great Britain 2:20.78 q
32 3 6 Paul Newallo  Trinidad and Tobago 2:28.88  
33 3 2 Oscar Ortigosa  Peru 2:29.73  
37 3 7 Tryggvi Helgason  Iceland 2:32.03  
  3 1 Amine El-Domyati  Lebanon DNS  
  3 4 John Moffet  United States DNS  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
5 4 4 Richard Schroeder  United States 2:19.23 Q
7 4 3 Alexandre Yokochi  Portugal 2:19.76 Q
15 4 6 Thomas Böhm  Austria 2:22.17 q
17 4 5 Raffaele Avagnano  Italy 2:22.90 q, WD
29 4 2 Andrés Aguilar  Costa Rica 2:27.69  
31 4 7 Jorge Henao  Venezuela 2:28.03  
41 4 1 Ahmad Al-Hahdoud  Lebanon 2:37.63  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
8 5 5 Pablo Restrepo  Colombia 2:19.77 Q
14 5 3 Enrique Romero  Spain 2:21.25 q
18 5 4 Gerald Mörken  West Germany 2:22.99 q, WD
26 5 2 Jin Fu  China 2:26.34  
35 5 7 Jairulla Jaitulla  Philippines 2:30.87  
44 5 1 Harrell Woolard  Virgin Islands 2:45.68  
  5 6 Felix Morf  Switzerland DSQ  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
1 6 4 Glenn Beringen  Australia 2:17.29 Q
9 6 5 Adrian Moorhouse  Great Britain 2:19.83 q
16 6 3 Kenji Watanabe  Japan 2:22.33 q
23 6 6 Eyal Stigman  Israel 2:24.93  
28 6 2 Brett Austin  New Zealand 2:27.25  
38 6 7 Watt Kam Sing  Hong Kong 2:32.13  
40 6 1 Fernando Marroquin  Guatemala 2:35.21  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
2 7 4 Victor Davis  Canada 2:18.20 Q
4 7 5 Étienne Dagon  Switzerland 2:18.95 Q
11 7 3 Thierry Pata  France 2:20.04 q
22 7 6 Peter Lang  West Germany 2:24.60  
34 7 2 Julio César Falon  Argentina 2:30.40  
36 7 7 Victor Ruberry  Bermuda 2:31.48  
39 7 1 Ayman Nadim  Egypt 2:33.17  
 

Men's 100 metres Butterfly

 Host City: Los Angeles, United States
Venue(s): Olympic Swim Stadium, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California
Date Started: July 30, 1984
Date Finished: July 30, 1984

 Competitors 53from 39 nations

Summary

The top 100 butterflyer in 1982-83 had been the United States' [Matt Gribble]. After winning the 1982 World Championships, he had set the world record of 53.44 in 1983 and bettered 54 seconds six times, the only swimmer in the world to break that barrier. He made the US team but placed second at the Olympic Trials to [Pablo Morales], who broke the world record in winning, recording 53.38. But Gribble was injured in Los Angeles, having hurt his back, and his coach commented, "The Trials was a miracle swim for him. He hadn't done any sprint work and not yardage since his injury. He was swimming off his background." Gribble would sadly fail to qualify for the Olympic final.

But [Michael GrosŸ] was so good at the Olympics that he likely may have won even facing a top-notch Gribble. The day before this race he had won the 200 freestyle in world record time. Morales was ahead at the wall in 24.76, ahead of his world record pace, and had '½-a-bodylength on GrosŸ. But he gradually closed the gap and regained the lead 10 metres from the wall, outtouching Morales in 53.08, another world record, as Morales was also under the old standard, with 53.23. The final was fast, very fast, as every swimmer except eighth-place finisher [Bengt Baron] (SWE), the 1980 Olympic champ in the 100 back, recorded a personal best and a national record.

 The final of the men's 100 metre butterfly event at the 1984 Summer Olympics was held in the McDonald's Olympic Swim Stadium in Los Angeles, California, on July 30, 1984. The first eight qualified for the final, the next eight for the B-final.
 

Records

Prior to this competition, the existing world and Olympic records were as follows.

World record  Pablo Morales (USA) 53.38 Indianapolis, United States 26 June 1984
Olympic record  Mark Spitz (USA) 54.27 Munich, West Germany 31 August 1972

The following records were established during the competition:

DateRoundNameNationTimeRecord
30 July Heat 7 Pablo Morales  United States 53.78 OR
30 July Final A Michael Gross  West Germany 53.08 WR
 

Final A

RankLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
1st, gold medalist(s) 5 Michael Gross  West Germany 53.08 WR
2nd, silver medalist(s) 4 Pablo Morales  United States 53.23 AM
3rd, bronze medalist(s) 7 Glenn Buchanan  Australia 53.85 OC
4 3 Rafael Vidal  Venezuela 54.27 NR
5 6 Andy Jameson  Great Britain 54.28 NR
6 1 Anthony Mosse  New Zealand 54.93 NR
7 8 Andreas Behrend  West Germany 54.95  
8 2 Bengt Baron  Sweden 55.14  
 

Final B

RankLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
9 4 Tom Ponting  Canada 55.31  
10 8 Théophile David  Switzerland 55.40  
11 5 Dano Halsall  Switzerland 55.51  
12 3 David López-Zubero  Spain 55.61  
6 Kristofer Stivenson  Greece  
14 2 Cees Vervoorn  Netherlands 55.75  
15 1 Søren Østberg  Denmark 56.04  
  7 Fabrizio Rampazzo  Italy DNS  
 

Heats

Rule: The eight fastest swimmers advance to final A (Q), while the next eight to final B (q).

RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
6 1 5 Glenn Buchanan  Australia 54.86 Q, OC
10 1 3 Dano Halsall  Switzerland 55.35 q
14 1 4 David López-Zubero  Spain 55.66 q
25 1 6 İhsan Sabri Özün  Turkey 56.55 NR
38 1 2 Tsang Yi Ming  Hong Kong 58.25  
42 1 7 Deryck Marks  Jamaica 1:00.57  
48 1 1 Adel Al-Ghaith  Kuwait 1:04.62  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
3 2 4 Rafael Vidal  Venezuela 54.33 Q, NR
15 2 5 Fabrizio Rampazzo  Italy 55.70 q
20 2 6 Harri Garmendia  Spain 55.97  
30 2 3 Hrvoje Barić  Yugoslavia 56.70  
39 2 2 Sean Nottage  Bahamas 58.73  
41 2 7 Ahmed Eid  Egypt 58.95  
52 2 1 Samuela Tupou  Fiji 1:07.75  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
8 3 5 Andreas Behrend  West Germany 55.22 Q
12 3 6 Kristofer Stivenson  Greece 55.46 q, NR
21 3 2 Anthony Nesty  Suriname 56.15 NR
25 3 2 Gérard de Kort  Netherlands 56.55  
29 3 4 Filiberto Colon  Puerto Rico 56.66  
40 3 7 Bang Jun-young  South Korea 58.91  
44 3 1 Faisal Marzouk  Kuwait 1:02.00  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
4 4 5 Andy Jameson  Great Britain 54.59 Q, NR
9 4 4 Tom Ponting  Canada 55.23 q
22 4 6 Taihei Saka  Japan 56.40  
28 4 3 Ang Peng Siong  Singapore 56.61 NR
34 4 2 Allan Marsh  Jamaica 57.69  
37 4 7 João Santos  Portugal 58.17  
47 4 1 Ibrahim El-Baba  Lebanon 1:04.48  
50 4 8 Salvador Corelo  Honduras 1:05.91  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
5 5 5 Bengt Baron  Sweden 54.67 Q
11 5 4 Matt Gribble  United States 55.39 q, WD
12 5 3 Cees Vervoorn  Netherlands 55.46 q
24 5 6 Shudo Kawawa  Japan 56.52  
35 5 7 Ahmed Said  Egypt 57.71  
36 5 2 Kemal Sadri Özün  Turkey 57.75  
46 5 8 Juan Miranda Trejo  El Salvador 1:04.33  
49 5 1 Warren Sorby  Fiji 1:05.53  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
2 6 4 Michael Gross  West Germany 54.02 Q, EU
17 6 5 Søren Østberg  Denmark 55.73 q
18 6 3 Théophile David  Switzerland 55.81 q
23 6 6 Ian Collins  Great Britain 56.41  
27 6 2 Zheng Jian  China 56.58  
33 6 7 Carlos Romo  Mexico 57.61  
45 6 1 Roberto Granados  Guatemala 1:02.32  
53 6 8 Esa Fadel  Bahrain 1:13.27  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
1 7 4 Pablo Morales  United States 53.78 Q, OR
7 7 6 Anthony Mosse  New Zealand 55.19 Q, NR
15 7 3 Mark Stockwell  Australia 55.70 q, WD
19 7 5 David Churchill  Canada 55.84  
31 7 7 Luis Juncos  Argentina 56.86 NR
32 7 2 Carlos Scanavino  Uruguay 57.46  
43 7 1 Ingi Jónsson  Iceland 1:00.68  
51 7 8 Trevor Ncala  Swaziland 1:06.94  
 

Men's 200 metres Butterfly

 Host City: Los Angeles, United States
Venue(s): Olympic Swim Stadium, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California
Date Started: August 3, 1984
Date Finished: August 3, 1984

 Competitors 38from 28 nations

Summary

West German [Michael GrosŸ] was the clear favorite. He had won the event at the 1982 World Championships, and had set the world record to win the 1983 European Championships, with 1:57.05. By contrast, [Jon Sieben] had a best time of 2:01.17 coming into the Olympics, which he had done at the Australian Trials in February, and was a long shot to even make the final. When this event started, GrosŸ had already won the 100 fly and the 200 freestyle, and the only question mark seemed to be who would win the other medals, with [Pablo Morales] (USA) and Venezuela's [Rafael Vidal] seemingly being the main challengers. But Sieben surprised in qualifying with 1:59.63 to move on to the final.

The final started as expected as GrosŸ went out fast, trailed early by Vidal. Morales made his move at 100 metres. Sieben was out in lane six, unwatched by the crowd and the other swimmers, but by the final turn he had moved to Vidal's shoulder, who was in lane five. In the last 25 metres it was very close, with all four swimmers coming to the wall almost together and no one was certain who had won. In one of the biggest upsets in Olympic swimming history, it was Jon Sieben, who said later, "I only knew I'd won when I turned around and saw on the board." Sieben finished in a world record 1:57.04, 1/100th of a second ahead of GrosŸ's mark, with GrosŸ in second, Vidal and third, and Morales pushed off the podium despite swimming 1:57.75.

 The final of the men's 200 metre butterfly event at the 1984 Summer Olympics was held in the McDonald's Olympic Swim Stadium in Los Angeles, California, on August 3, 1984. The first eight qualified for the final, the next eight for the B-final.
 

Records

Prior to this competition, the existing world and Olympic records were as follows.

World record  Michael Gross (FRG) 1:57.05 Rome, Italy 26 August 1983
Olympic record  Mike Bruner (USA) 1:59.23 Montreal, Canada 18 July 1976

The following records were established during the competition:

DateRoundNameNationTimeRecord
3 August Heat 5 Michael Gross  West Germany 1:58.72 OR
3 August Final A Jon Sieben  Australia 1:57.04 WR
 

Final A

RankLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
1st, gold medalist(s) 6 Jon Sieben  Australia 1:57.04 WR
2nd, silver medalist(s) 4 Michael Gross  West Germany 1:57.40  
3rd, bronze medalist(s) 5 Rafael Vidal  Venezuela 1:57.51 AM
4 3 Pablo Morales  United States 1:57.75 NR
5 2 Anthony Mosse  New Zealand 1:58.75 NR
6 7 Tom Ponting  Canada 1:59.37  
7 1 Peter Ward  Canada 2:00.39  
8 8 Patrick Kennedy  United States 2:01.03  
 

Final B

RankLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
9 5 Taihei Saka  Japan 2:00.31 NR
10 6 Frank Drost  Netherlands 2:01.23  
11 2 Nick Hodgson  Great Britain 2:01.24  
12 7 Filiberto Colon  Puerto Rico 2:01.27  
13 3 Gérard de Kort  Netherlands 2:01.30  
14 4 Paolo Revelli  Italy 2:01.58  
15 1 Harri Garmendia  Spain 2:01.82  
16 8 Philip Hubble  Great Britain 2:03.06  
 

Heats

Rule: The eight fastest swimmers advance to final A (Q), while the next eight to final B (q).

RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
8 1 4 Patrick Kennedy  United States 2:00.28 Q
12 1 5 Gérard de Kort  Netherlands 2:00.83 q
17 1 3 Philip Hubble  Great Britain 2:02.76 q
20 1 6 Théophile David  Switzerland 2:03.21  
24 1 2 Alberto José Umana  Venezuela 2:05.29  
28 1 7 Bang Jun-young  South Korea 2:07.80  
33 1 1 Roberto Granados  Guatemala 2:13.79  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
10 2 4 Ricardo Prado  Brazil 2:00.59 q, WD
13 2 5 Frank Drost  Netherlands 2:01.18 q
21 2 3 Thomas Lejdström  Sweden 2:03.81  
22 2 2 Yoram Kochavy  Israel 2:04.08  
25 2 6 Andreas Behrend  West Germany 2:06.06  
29 2 7 Tsang Yi Ming  Hong Kong 2:08.44  
  2 1 Ahmed Said  Egypt DNS  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
5 3 5 Anthony Mosse  New Zealand 1:59.76 Q
6 3 4 Tom Ponting  Canada 1:59.78 Q
7 3 3 Peter Ward  Canada 1:59.99 Q
16 3 6 Harri Garmendia  Spain 2:02.37 q
18 3 2 Kristofer Stivenson  Greece 2:02.94  
26 3 7 Søren Østberg  Denmark 2:06.12  
32 3 1 Harry Wozniak  Barbados 2:13.17  
34 3 8 Juan José Piro  Honduras 2:22.80  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
3 4 4 Pablo Morales  United States 1:59.19 Q, NR
4 4 3 Jon Sieben  Australia 1:59.63 Q
9 4 5 Paolo Revelli  Italy 2:00.38 q
11 4 6 Taihei Saka  Japan 2:00.66 q
19 4 2 Shudo Kawawa  Japan 2:03.07  
27 4 7 İhsan Sabri Özün  Turkey 2:07.45  
31 4 1 Mohamed Youssef  Egypt 2:08.88  
  4 8 Marcelo Jucá  Brazil DNS  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
1 5 4 Michael Gross  West Germany 1:58.72 Q, OR
2 5 5 Rafael Vidal  Venezuela 1:59.15 Q, AM
14 5 6 Nick Hodgson  Great Britain 2:01.64 q
15 5 3 Filiberto Colon  Puerto Rico 2:01.80 q
23 5 7 João Santos  Portugal 2:04.72  
30 5 1 Andrés Aguilar  Costa Rica 2:08.74  
35 5 8 Juan Miranda Trejo  El Salvador 2:38.32  
  5 2 Fabrizio Rampazzo  Italy DNS  
 

Men's 200 metres Individual Medley

Host City: Los Angeles, United States
Venue(s): Olympic Swim Stadium, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California
Date Started: August 4, 1984
Date Finished: August 4, 1984 

 Competitors 46from 32 nations

Summary

The world record holder in both individual medleys was Canadian [Alex Baumann], who held the 200 IM mark with 2:02.25 set in Brisbane, Australia in October 1982. Five days before this event, he had won gold in the 400 IM in Los Angeles. He seemingly went out slowly in the final, standing only seventh at 50 metres after the butterfly, but he was actually ahead of his world record pace. He continued to improve his pace on the backstroke and breaststroke legs, and took the lead on the third leg over [Pablo Morales]. When Baumann torched the freestyle leg in 28.14, he had a big world record with 2:01.42 to win the gold medal by 1.63 seconds over Morales, with Britain's [Neil Cochran] taking bronze.

 The final of the men's 200 metre individual medley event at the 1984 Summer Olympics was held in the McDonald's Olympic Swim Stadium in Los Angeles, California, on August 4, 1984. The first eight qualified for the final, the next eight for the B-final.
 

Records

Prior to this competition, the existing world and Olympic records were as follows.

World record  Alex Baumann (CAN) 2:02.25 Brisbane, Australia 1 August 1982
Olympic record  Gunnar Larsson (SWE) 2:07.17 Munich, West Germany 3 September 1972

The following records were established during the competition:

DateRoundNameNationTimeRecord
4 August Heat 5 Alex Baumann  Canada 2:03.60 OR
4 August Final A Alex Baumann  Canada 2:01.42 WR
 

Final A

RankLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
1st, gold medalist(s) 4 Alex Baumann  Canada 2:01.42 WR
2nd, silver medalist(s) 3 Pablo Morales  United States 2:03.05  
3rd, bronze medalist(s) 6 Neil Cochran  Great Britain 2:04.38  
4 5 Robin Brew  Great Britain 2:04.52  
5 7 Steve Lundquist  United States 2:04.91  
6 8 Andrew Phillips  Jamaica 2:05.60 NR
7 2 Nicolai Klapkarek  West Germany 2:05.88 NR
8 1 Ralf Diegel  West Germany 2:06.66  
 

Final B

RankLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
9 4 Rob Woodhouse  Australia 2:04.86 OC
10 2 Shinji Ito  Japan 2:06.07 AS
11 5 Giovanni Franceschi  Italy 2:06.10  
12 3 Maurizio Divano  Italy 2:06.72  
13 7 Peter Rohde  Denmark 2:07.10  
14 2 Arne Borgstrøm  Norway 2:08.03  
15 8 Pablo Restrepo  Colombia 2:08.35  
16 6 Mikael Örn  Sweden 2:11.79  
 

Heats

Rule: The eight fastest swimmers advance to final A (Q), while the next eight to final B (q).

RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
4 1 4 Neil Cochran  Great Britain 2:05.39 Q
9 1 5 Rob Woodhouse  Australia 2:06.45 q
16 1 3 Arne Borgstrøm  Norway 2:08.09 q
26 1 6 Andrés Aguilar  Costa Rica 2:11.63  
29 1 2 Luis Juncos  Argentina 2:12.83  
30 1 7 Emad El-Shafei  Egypt 2:14.87  
39 1 1 Warren Sorby  Fiji 2:22.74  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
11 2 4 Ricardo Prado  Brazil 2:07.16 q, WD
15 2 6 Peter Rohde  Denmark 2:07.93 q
21 2 5 Rob Chernoff  Canada 2:08.47  
22 2 3 Glenn Beringen  Australia 2:08.65  
31 2 2 David Morley  Bahamas 2:16.85  
32 2 7 Tsang Yi Ming  Hong Kong 2:17.75  
38 2 1 Roberto Granados  Guatemala 2:22.73  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
2 3 5 Robin Brew  Great Britain 2:04.13 Q, EU
3 3 4 Pablo Morales  United States 2:04.32 Q
7 3 3 Ralf Diegel  West Germany 2:06.41 Q
25 3 6 Feng Dawei  China 2:11.30  
36 3 8 Salvador Corelo  Honduras 2:22.29  
40 3 1 Harrell Woolard  Virgin Islands 2:27.51  
  3 7 Fernando Rodríguez  Peru DSQ  
  3 2 Alexander Pilhatsch  Austria DNS  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
6 4 4 Steve Lundquist  United States 2:06.10 Q
8 4 5 Andrew Phillips  Jamaica 2:06.43 Q
14 4 3 Shinji Ito  Japan 2:07.76 q
17 4 6 Pablo Restrepo  Colombia 2:08.12 q
23 4 2 Eduardo Morillo  Mexico 2:09.87  
28 4 7 Jairulla Jaitulla  Philippines 2:12.82  
35 4 1 Brian Farlow  Virgin Islands 2:20.53  
41 4 8 Michele Piva  San Marino 2:29.81  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
1 5 4 Alex Baumann  Canada 2:03.60 Q, OR
13 5 5 Mikael Örn  Sweden 2:07.56 q
18 5 3 Edsard Schlingemann  Netherlands 2:08.27  
19 5 6 Harri Garmendia  Spain 2:08.30  
27 5 2 Yoram Kochavy  Israel 2:11.81  
37 5 1 Harry Wozniak  Barbados 2:22.49  
42 5 8 Joaquim Cruz  Mozambique 2:35.99  
  5 7 Manuel Gutiérrez  Panama DSQ  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
5 6 6 Nicolai Klapkarek  West Germany 2:06.07 Q
10 6 4 Giovanni Franceschi  Italy 2:06.76 q
12 6 3 Maurizio Divano  Italy 2:07.19 q
20 6 5 Anders Peterson  Sweden 2:08.35  
24 6 2 Chen Qin  China 2:10.30  
33 6 1 Ng Wing Hon  Hong Kong 2:18.64  
34 6 8 Samuela Tupou  Fiji 2:19.79  
  6 7 Gökhan Attaroglu  Turkey DSQ  
 
 

Men's 400 metres Individual Medley

 Host City: Los Angeles, United States
Venue(s): Olympic Swim Stadium, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California
Date Started: July 30, 1984
Date Finished: July 30, 1984

 Competitors 24from 20 nations

Summary

Sidelined by a shoulder injury in 1982, Canadian Alex Baumann had to watch as the World Championships were held, and Brazil's [Ricardo Prado] won the title and set the world record of 4:19.78. But Baumann improved later that year and won gold in both IMs at the 1982 Commonwealth Games. Early in 1984, East German [Jens-Peter Berndt] broke Prado's world record in Magdeburg, recording 4:19.61, only to see Baumann improve that at the Canadian Olympic Trials in June, with 4:17.53. Berndt was out, a victim of the Soviet-led boycott, but Prado was in Los Angeles, as was American [Jesse Vassallo], once the world best in this event, holding the world mark from 1978-82, but now past his best.

In the final Prado led after the first two legs, with Baumann still 1.7 seconds back at 200 metres, with Vassallo. But Baumann outswam Prado by three seconds on the breaststroke to take the lead, as Vassallo fell back. Baumann held on in the freestyle, and won with a world record 4:17.41, over a second ahead of Prado, as the bronze medal went to the surprising Australian [Rob Woodhouse].

A few weeks later Berndt won the Friendship Games in 4:18.29. On 7 January 1985, after swimming at a meet in Arkansas, Berndt defected to the United States at the Oklahoma City airport, and would later swim for West Germany at the 1988 Olympics. Baumann had known similar circumstances. Born in Czechoslovakia, he and his family were in New Zealand in 1968 when Soviet tanks rolled into Prague to crush Czech resistance. The family decided not to return to their native land, and settled in Sudbury, Ontario, where Baumann grew up and became the world's greatest all-around swimmer.

 The final of the men's 200 metre individual medley event at the 1984 Summer Olympics was held in the McDonald's Olympic Swim Stadium in Los Angeles, California, on July 30, 1984. The first eight qualified for the final, the next eight for the B-final.
 

Records

Prior to this competition, the existing world and Olympic records were as follows.

World record  Alex Baumann (CAN) 4:17.53 Etobicoke, Canada 17 June 1984
Olympic record  Aleksandr Sidorenko (URS) 4:22.89 Moscow, Soviet Union 27 July 1980

The following records were established during the competition:

DateRoundNameNationTimeRecord
30 July Heat 3 Alex Baumann  Canada 4:22.46 OR
30 July Final A Alex Baumann  Canada 4:17.41 WR
 

Final A

RankLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
1st, gold medalist(s) 4 Alex Baumann  Canada 4:17.41 WR
2nd, silver medalist(s) 6 Ricardo Prado  Brazil 4:18.45 SA
3rd, bronze medalist(s) 1 Rob Woodhouse  Australia 4:20.50 OC
4 7 Jesse Vassallo  United States 4:21.46  
5 2 Maurizio Divano  Italy 4:22.76  
6 5 Jeff Kostoff  United States 4:23.28  
7 8 Stephen Poulter  Great Britain 4:25.80  
8 3 Giovanni Franceschi  Italy 4:26.05  
 

Final B

RankLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
9 1 Anders Peterson  Sweden 4:27.95 NR
10 3 Andrew Phillips  Jamaica 4:27.98 NR
11 5 Arne Borgstrøm  Norway 4:28.20  
12 4 Ralf Diegel  West Germany 4:28.94  
13 2 Shinji Ito  Japan 4:29.76 AS
14 6 Peter Dobson  Canada 4:30.09  
15 7 Stuart Willmott  Great Britain 4:31.10  
16 8 Yoram Kochavy  Israel 4:40.00  
 

Heats

Rule: The eight fastest swimmers advance to final A (Q), while the next eight to final B (q).

RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
3 1 4 Giovanni Franceschi  Italy 4:23.03 Q
5 1 5 Maurizio Divano  Italy 4:23.61 Q
12 1 3 Peter Dobson  Canada 4:29.61 q
13 1 2 Shinji Ito  Japan 4:30.52 q
14 1 6 Stuart Willmott  Great Britain 4:32.90 q
17 1 7 Scott Newkirk  Virgin Islands 4:48.15  
20 1 1 Ng Wing Hon  Hong Kong 4:58.98  
23 1 8 Juan José Piro  Honduras 5:15.68  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
4 2 4 Ricardo Prado  Brazil 4:23.31 Q
6 2 5 Jesse Vassallo  United States 4:23.82 Q
9 2 3 Ralf Diegel  West Germany 4:28.10 q
10 2 6 Arne Borgstrøm  Norway 4:28.37 q
11 2 7 Andrew Phillips  Jamaica 4:29.43 q, NR
15 2 2 Anders Peterson  Sweden 4:32.93 q
18 2 1 Jairulla Jaitulla  Philippines 4:51.24  
21 2 8 Julian Bolling  Sri Lanka 5:02.88  
RankHeatLaneNameNationalityTimeNotes
1 3 4 Alex Baumann  Canada 4:22.46 Q, OR
2 3 5 Jeff Kostoff  United States 4:22.55 Q
7 3 3 Rob Woodhouse  Australia 4:24.85 Q, OC
8 3 6 Stephen Poulter  Great Britain 4:25.38 Q, NR
16 3 7 Yoram Kochavy  Israel 4:35.70 q, NR
19 3 1 Harry Wozniak  Barbados 4:53.87  
22 3 8 Wu Ming Hsun  Hong Kong 5:02.94  
  3 2 Rafael Escalas  Spain DNS  
 

Men's 4 x— 100 metres Medley Relay

 Host City: Los Angeles, United States
Venue(s): Olympic Swim Stadium, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California
Date Started: August 4, 1984
Date Finished: August 4, 1984

 Competitors 94from 21 nations

Summary

It had been 1970 since a nation other than the United States had held the world record in this event, that being East Germany. Except for 1980, when they were not present, the USA had never lost this race at the Olympics. This was the last event of the 1984 swimming program and the result was expected to be the same. The USA had won gold in world record times at the 1982 World Championships and the 1983 Pan American Games. On the opening leg of the final backstroker [Rick Carey] went out in 55.41, finally erasing [John Naber]'€™s Olympic record for the 100 back. That put the USA well in front, and the race was all but over. On each leg, the US swimmers opened up more of a lead, eventually winning by almost four seconds over Canada, setting a world record of 3:39.30 in the process. Australia won bronze, with West Germany trailing in fourth. As the pro-USA audience cheered their boys wildly, on the side of the pool, American breaststroker [Steve Lundquist] unfurled a towel, on which he had printed, '€œAmerica '€¦ than you for a dream come true!'€

 The final of the men's 4 × 100 metre medley relay event at the 1984 Summer Olympics was held in Los Angeles, California, on August 4, 1984. The first eight qualified for the final.
 

Records

Prior to this competition, the existing world and Olympic records were as follows.

World record  United States (USA)
Rick Carey (55.60)
Steve Lundquist (1:02.01)
Matt Gribble (53.47)
Rowdy Gaines (49.34)
3:40.42 Caracas, Venezuela 22 August 1983
Olympic record  United States (USA)
John Naber (55.89)
John Hencken (1:02.50)
Matt Vogel (54.26)
Jim Montgomery (49.57)
3:42.22 Montreal, Canada 22 July 1976

The following new world and Olympic records were set during this competition.

DateEventNameNationalityTimeRecord
4 August Final Rick Carey (55.41)
Steve Lundquist (1:01.86)
Pablo Morales (52.87)
Rowdy Gaines (49.16)
 United States 3:39.30 WR
 

Final

RankLaneNationSwimmersTimeNotes
1st, gold medalist(s) 5  United States Rick Carey (55.41)
Steve Lundquist (1:01.86)
Pablo Morales (52.87)
Rowdy Gaines (49.16)
3:39.30 WR
2nd, silver medalist(s) 3  Canada Mike West (56.61)
Victor Davis (1:02.33)
Tom Ponting (54.01)
Sandy Goss (50.28)
3:43.23 NR
3rd, bronze medalist(s) 4  Australia Mark Kerry (57.12)
Peter Evans (1:02.29)
Glenn Buchanan (54.68)
Mark Stockwell (49.16)
3:43.25 OC
4 2  West Germany Stefan Peter (58.21)
Gerald Mörken (1:03.55)
Michael Gross (52.81)
Dirk Korthals (49.69)
3:44.26 NR
5 7  Sweden Bengt Baron (57.16)
Peter Berggren (1:05.00)
Thomas Lejdström (54.98)
Per Johansson (49.99)
3:47.13  
6 1  Great Britain Neil Harper (58.37)
Adrian Moorhouse (1:03.61)
Andy Jameson (54.10)
Richard Burrell (51.31)
3:47.39 NR
7 6  Switzerland Patrick Ferland (58.64)
Étienne Dagon (1:03.70)
Théophile David (55.34)
Dano Halsall (50.25)
3:47.93 NR
  8  Japan Daichi Suzuki (57.70)
Shigehiro Takahashi (1:03.70)
Taihei Saka (55.35)
Hiroshi Sakamoto
DSQ  
 

Heats

Rule: The eight fastest teams advance to the final (Q).

 
RankHeatLaneNationSwimmersTimeNotes
3 1 4  Canada Mike West (58.11)
Victor Davis (1:02.54)
Tom Ponting (54.22)
Sandy Goss (51.25)
3:46.12 Q
9 1 1  New Zealand Paul Kingsman (58.73)
Brett Austin (1:04.83)
Anthony Mosse (54.93)
Gary Hurring (52.07)
3:50.56 NR
10 1 5  France Frédéric Delcourt (59.11)
Thierry Pata (1:04.91)
Xavier Savin (55.98)
Stéphan Caron (50.75)
3:50.75  
13 1 3  Venezuela Giovanni Frigo (59.85)
Jorge Henão (1:08.54)
Rafael Vidal (55.51)
Alberto Mestre (51.22)
3:55.12  
14 1 6  Mexico Ernesto Vela (1:01.08)
Eduardo Morillo (1:06.02)
Carlos Romo (57.10)
Ramiro Estrada (51.88)
3:56.11  
19 1 7  Guatemala Ernesto José Degenhart (1:05.10)
Fernando Marroquin (1:09.91)
Roberto Granados (1:03.35)
Rodrigo Leal (58.58)
4:16.94  
20 1 8  Honduras Salvador Covelo (1:08.53)
David Palma (1:12.56)
Juan José Piño (1:02.62)
Rodolfo Torres (59.01)
4:22.72  
  1 2  Turkey   DNS  
RankHeatLaneNationSwimmersTimeNotes
5 2 4  West Germany Stefan Peter (58.43)
Gerald Mörken (1:05.49)
Andreas Behrend (55.20)
Alexander Schowtka (50.60)
3:49.75 Q
7 2 5  Great Britain Neil Harper (59.12)
Adrian Moorhouse (1:04.95)
Andy Jameson (54.66)
David Lowe (51.13)
3:49.86 Q
11 2 6  China Wang Hao (58.87)
Jin Fu (1:04.74)
Zheng Jian (56.78)
Mu Lat (51.32)
3:51.71  
12 2 1  Brazil Ricardo Prado (58.82)
Luiz Carvalho (1:06.21)
Marcelo Jucá (57.24)
Cyro Delgado (51.22)
3:53.49  
16 2 2  Singapore David Lim Fong Jock (1:00.59)
Oon Jin Teik (1:08.25)
Ang Peng Siong (57.83)
Oon Jin Gee (53.40)
4:00.07  
18 2 7  Virgin Islands Erik Rosskopf (1:03.71)
Harrell Woolard (1:13.50)
Scott Newkirk (1:02.70)
Collier Woolard (56.27)
4:16.18  
  2 3  Italy Paolo Falchini (58.93)
Gianni Minervini (1:03.78)
Fabrizio Rampazzo (55.80)
Marcello Guarducci
DSQ  
  2 8  Lebanon   DNS  
RankHeatLaneNationSwimmersTimeNotes
1 3 5  Australia Mark Kerry (57.41)
Peter Evans (1:02.67)
Jon Sieben (54.24)
Neil Brooks (49.61)
3:43.93 Q
2 3 4  United States Dave Wilson (57.06)
Richard Schroeder (1:02.66)
Mike Heath (54.60)
Tom Jager (50.01)
3:44.33 Q
4 3 3  Switzerland Patrick Ferland (58.68)
Étienne Dagon (1:03.87)
Théophile David (55.24)
Dano Halsall (50.34)
3:48.13 Q
6 3 8  Sweden Michael Söderlund (58.79)
Peter Berggren (1:05.22)
Bengt Baron (54.98)
Per Johansson (50.77)
3:49.76 Q
8 3 6  Japan Daichi Suzuki (58.31)
Shigehiro Takahashi (1:04.05)
Taihei Saka (55.66)
Hiroshi Sakamoto (52.12)
3:50.14 Q, NR
15 3 2  Egypt Sharif Nour (59.09)
Ayman Nadim (1:09.53)
Ahmed Said (57.73)
Mohamed Youssef (52.96)
3:59.31  
17 3 1  Jamaica Allan Marsh (1:00.53)
Andrew Phillips (1:09.63)
Deryck Marks (1:00.35)
Gordon Scarlett (54.84)
3:59.31  
  3 7  Hong Kong   DNS  
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