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2000  Sydney Summer Olympics

2000 Summer Olympics - The Results (Cycling - Road)

Cycling at the 2000 Sydney Summer Games

 

Host City: Sydney, Australia
Date Started: September 16, 2000
Date Finished: September 20, 2000
Events: 18

Participants: 462 (341 men and 121 women) from 55 countries
Youngest Participant: CAN Genevieve Jeanson (19 years, 29 days)
Oldest Participant: BEL Ã‰tienne De Wilde (42 years, 30 days)
Most Medals (Athlete): NED Leontien Zijlaard-van Moorsel (4 medals)
Most Medals (Country): GER Germany (10 medals)

In the east of Sydney's urban sprawl lies Centennial Park, an expansive green retreat; the home of lakes, cricket pitches, horse trails, cycling and roller blade tracks.
Both the cycling road race and time trials were held around the park on a course which offered spectators free viewing of the world's top cyclists as they whizzed past along the 17.1 km circuit. The women completed seven laps while the men covered 14 laps.
From the start line contestants headed north, turned into a newly constructed road across the top of Moore Park and circled south to Randwick. Then they travelled through the leafy suburbs around Centennial Park, pushed up the hill beside Queens Park, headed east towards the beach suburb of Bronte, travelled through Waverley and came back into Centennial Park. The time trials followed a similar route but skipped the long slog up the hill from Bronte.

Overview

There were several changes to the Olympic Program in 2000, all on the track. The women’s program added a fourth event – the 500 metre time trial added to the match sprint, individual pursuit, and points race. For men, three events were added. These were related to the addition of professional riders that had occurred at the 1996 Olympics, and were all events contested at the World Championships by professionals. The new events were the keirin, the Madison, and the Olympic sprint.

The keirin is one of the most exciting events in cycling because of the speeds. The event is a 2,000 metre paced event, in which the riders ride behind a motorized derny, which increases the potential speeds. The derny paces the riders for about 1,500 metres and then pulls off the track, at which time the cyclists begin a furious sprint to the finish. Keirin racing has traditionally been raced in Japan, where it has been a professional sport since the 1970s, and in which pari-mutuel betting on the riders is permitted.

The Madison is a mass-start team event with two riders per team. It is similar to a team points race, as points are awarded to the top finishers at the intermediate sprints and for the finishing sprint. Only one of the two team riders is actively racing at any one time, riding for a number of laps, and then exchanging with his partner, who is propelled into the pack by a hand sling from the cyclist leaving the racing.

The Olympic sprint is a team sprint event, similar to a shorter team pursuit, with each team consisting of three riders. Two teams compete against each other, starting on opposite sides of the track, with the goal being to catch the other team, or finish three laps of the track first. Each of the three riders leads their team for a single lap, and then drops off the track. The team time is that achieved when the final rider crosses the line.

The road race and mountain biking program in 2000 was the same as in 1996. Men and women contested an individual mass start road race, and individual road time trial, and a cross-country mountain biking event. The mountain bike races took place at Fairfield City Farm, while the road races were conducted on courses laid out around Sydney. The Olympic Velodrome was an indoor facility with a 250 metre wooden surfaced track.

The star of cycling in Sydney was Dutchwoman [Leontien Zijlaard-van Moorsel]. Long one of the top riders in the world, she had battled personal demons, notably bouts of anorexia nervosa, but in Sydney won three gold medals in the road race, road time trial, individual pursuit, and silver in the points race.

Road cycling

Event Gold Silver Bronze
Men's road race Jan Ullrich
 Germany
Alexander Vinokourov
 Kazakhstan
Andreas Klöden
 Germany
Men's time trial Viatcheslav Ekimov
 Russia
Jan Ullrich
 Germany
Vacated[1]
Women's road race Leontien Zijlaard
 Netherlands
Hanka Kupfernagel
 Germany
Diana Žiliūtė
 Lithuania
Women's time trial Leontien Zijlaard
 Netherlands
Mari Holden
 United States
Jeannie Longo-Ciprelli
 France
 

Medal table (all styles men & women)

 
Rank Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1  France (FRA) 5 2 1 8
2  Germany (GER) 3 4 3 10
3  Netherlands (NED) 3 1 0 4
4  Italy (ITA) 2 0 1 3
5  Australia (AUS) 1 2 3 6
6  Great Britain (GBR) 1 1 2 4
 Russia (RUS) 1 1 2 4
8  United States (USA) 1 1 0 2
9  Spain (ESP) 1 0 1 2
10  Belgium (BEL) 0 2 0 2
11  Switzerland (SUI) 0 1 1 2
 Ukraine (UKR) 0 1 1 2
13  Kazakhstan (KAZ) 0 1 0 1
 Uruguay (URU) 0 1 0 1
15  China (CHN) 0 0 1 1
 Lithuania (LTU) 0 0 1 1
Totals (16 nations) 18 18 17 53
 
 

Men's Road Race, Individual

 Host City: Sydney, Australia
Venue(s): Cycling Road Course, Centennial Parklands, Sydney, New South Wales
Date Started: September 27, 2000
Date Finished: September 27, 2000
Format: 239.4 km. (148.7 miles) mass start race.

Summary

The professional peleton was again present. As always, in a one-day race, choosing a favorite was difficult. The top professional riders were [Lance Armstrong], who had won the 1999-2000 Tour de France and would eventually win the race seven times consecutively, and [Jan Ullrich], who had won the 1997 Tour de France. But neither was considered a great sprinter. With 25 km. to do, the peleton made a grave tactical error when it allowed three riders from the same professional team, Deutsche Telekom (later T-Mobile), to get away together. The riders were Kazakhstan’s [Aleksandr Vinokurov], and the Germans [Andreas Kloden] and Ullrich. Vinokurov and Kloden served as domestiques on the Deutsche Telekom team, supporting and riding for Ullrich and the finish, with Ullrich winning the sprint comfortably for the gold medal, was a foregone conclusion. Armstrong missed the winning break and finished 13th.

Mother Nature was kinder to the men as they started their road race the next day, 27 September, in perfect conditions. Far larger crowds lined the surrounding streets to watch the world's best cycle by. These cycling celebrities provided a circling kaleidoscope of colour as the 154-strong field headed off in the mass start. Some spectators simply leaned over the front fences of their houses; others watched from the balconies of apartments. Crowds gathered around television sets in nearby cafes so that they could see the entire race, sipping their capuccinos and cheering the athletes as they fleetingly passed by.
The majority of spectators spilled into the surrounds of the parklands, either with friends, walking the dog or on their own more modest bicycles. An estimated global television audience of 600 million viewers saw the top riders from the Tour de France complete what was dubbed the scenic Tour de Sydney'.
Jan Ullrich of Germany won the 239.4 km race, beating Alexandre Vinokourov of Kazakhstan and German team-mate Andreas Kloeden. He attacked the course during the steep climb on the 13th of 14 laps, before winning in a time of 5:29:08, with a margin of 0:09 seconds. Although representing different countries, all three medal winners were under contract to the same professional team. Throughout the race, team tactics played an important part as riders talked to each other to determine the most appropriate time to sprint, break away, or ride with the pack.
These are the official results of the men's individual road race at the 2000 Summer Olympics in Sydney, Australia. The race was held on Wednesday, 27 September 2000 (the second day of competition of the games) with a race distance of 239.4 km. The estimated global TV audience was 600 million. They were specifically held in Bankstown, Sydney, New South Wales

Final classification

RANK CYCLIST NATION TIME
1 Jan Ullrich  Germany 5:29:08
2 Alexander Vinokourov  Kazakhstan + 0:09
3 Andreas Klöden  Germany + 0:12
4 Michele Bartoli  Italy + 1:26
5 Laurent Jalabert  France
6 Frank Høj  Denmark
7 Piotr Wadecki  Poland
8 George Hincapie  United States
9 Paolo Bettini  Italy
10 Dmitri Konychev  Russia
11 Danilo Di Luca  Italy + 1:29
12 Axel Merckx  Belgium
DSQ Lance Armstrong[1]  United States
14 Erik Zabel  Germany + 1:38
15 Max van Heeswijk  Netherlands
16 Gordon Fraser  Canada
17 Óscar Freire  Spain
18 Jaan Kirsipuu  Estonia
19 Robbie McEwen  Australia
20 Zbigniew Spruch  Poland
21 Markus Zberg  Switzerland
22 Arvis Piziks  Latvia
23 Peter Wrolich  Austria
24 Rolf Aldag  Germany
25 Léon van Bon  Netherlands
26 Andrej Hauptman  Slovenia
27 Vladimir Duma  Ukraine
28 Glenn Magnusson  Sweden
29 Pavel Tonkov  Russia
30 Henk Vogels  Australia
31 Ruber Marín  Colombia
32 Uros Murn  Slovenia
33 Nico Mattan  Belgium
34 Fred Rodriguez  United States
35 Maximiliano Sciandri  Great Britain
36 Serguei Ivanov  Russia
37 Oscar Camenzind  Switzerland
38 John Tanner  Great Britain
39 Serguei Outchakov  Ukraine
40 Nicki Sørensen  Denmark
41 Gerrit Glomser  Austria
42 Olexandr Fedenko  Ukraine
43 David McCann  Ireland
44 Raimondas Rumsas  Lithuania
45 Laurent Brochard  France
46 Andrei Teteriouk  Kazakhstan
47 Christopher Jenner  New Zealand
48 Zbigniew Piątek  Poland
49 Tyler Hamilton  United States
50 Omar Pumar  Venezuela
51 Matthias Buxhofer  Austria
52 Antonio Cruz  United States
53 Alexandr Shefer  Kazakhstan
54 Mauro Gianetti  Switzerland
55 Erki Putsep  Estonia
56 Jens Voigt  Germany
57 Sergei Yakovlev  Kazakhstan
58 Piotr Przydzial  Poland
59 Rolf Sørensen  Denmark
60 Abraham Olano  Spain
61 Julian Dean  New Zealand
62 Christophe Moreau  France
63 Richard Virenque  France
64 Laurent Dufaux  Switzerland
65 Volodimir Gustov  Ukraine
66 Francesco Casagrande  Italy
67 Marc Wauters  Belgium
68 Alex Zülle  Switzerland
69 Marco Pantani  Italy
70 Pavel Padrnos  Czech Republic
71 Rik Verbrugghe  Belgium
72 Eric Wohlberg  Canada
73 Andrei Kivilev  Kazakhstan
74 Ciarán Power  Ireland + 5:50
75 Viacheslav Ekimov  Russia
76 Tomáš Konečný  Czech Republic
77 Stuart O'Grady  Australia + 7:06
78 Bjørnar Vestøl  Norway
79 Peter Van Petegem  Belgium
80 Tristan Hoffman  Netherlands
81 Andris Reiss  Latvia + 12:53
82 José Medina  Chile + 12:54
83 Manuel Guevara  Venezuela + 13:35
84 Carlos Maya  Venezuela
85 Scott Guyton  New Zealand + 14:13
86 David George  South Africa + 16:43
87 Milan Dvorščík  Slovakia + 22:45
88 Alexis Méndez  Venezuela + 23:39
89 Murilo Fischer  Brazil
90 Martin Riska  Slovakia
91 Óscar Pineda  Guatemala
92 Pedro Pablo Pérez  Cuba + 23:40
  Scott McGrory  Australia DNF
  Matt White  Australia DNF
  René Haselbacher  Austria DNF
  Thomas Mühlbacher  Austria DNF
  Czeslaw Lukaszewicz  Canada DNF
  Brian Walton  Canada DNF
  Luis Fernando Sepúlveda  Chile DNF
  Santiago Botero  Colombia DNF
  Jhon García  Colombia DNF
  Fredy González  Colombia DNF
  Víctor Hugo Peña  Colombia DNF
  Radim Kořínek  Czech Republic DNF
  Ján Svorada  Czech Republic DNF
  Lars Michaelsen  Denmark DNF
  Michael Sandstød  Denmark DNF
  Mahmoud Abbas  Egypt DNF
  Amer El-Nady  Egypt DNF
  Mohamed Abdel Fattah  Egypt DNF
  Mohamed Kholafy  Egypt DNF
  Juan Carlos Domínguez  Spain DNF
  Santos González  Spain DNF
  Miguel Ángel Martín Perdiguero  Spain DNF
  Lauri Aus  Estonia DNF
  Innar Mändoja  Estonia DNF
  Janek Tombak  Estonia DNF
  Christophe Capelle  France DNF
  Nick Craig  Great Britain DNF
  Rob Hayles  Great Britain DNF
  Jeremy Hunt  Great Britain DNF
  Jazy Garcia  Guam DNF
  Hossein Askari  Iran DNF
  Ahad Kazemi  Iran DNF
  Yoshiyuki Abe  Japan DNF
  Evgeny Vakker  Kyrgyzstan DNF
  Raivis Belohvoščiks  Latvia DNF
  Andris Naudužs  Latvia DNF
  Dainis Ozols  Latvia DNF
  Artūras Kasputis  Lithuania DNF
  Remigijus Lupeikis  Lithuania DNF
  Saulius Šarkauskas  Lithuania DNF
  Erik Dekker  Netherlands DNF
  Koos Moerenhout  Netherlands DNF
  Kurt Asle Arvesen  Norway DNF
  Svein Gaute Hølestøl  Norway DNF
  Thor Hushovd  Norway DNF
  Glen Mitchell  New Zealand DNF
  Piotr Chmielewski  Poland DNF
  José Azevedo  Portugal DNF
  Bruno Castanheira  Portugal DNF
  Vítor Gamito  Portugal DNF
  Orlando Rodrigues  Portugal DNF
  Robert Hunter  South Africa DNF
  Evgeni Petrov  Russia DNF
  Martin Hvastija  Slovenia DNF
  Tadej Valjavec  Slovenia DNF
  Roman Broniš  Slovakia DNF
  Róbert Nagy  Slovakia DNF
  Magnus Bäckstedt  Sweden DNF
  Michel Lafis  Sweden DNF
  Martin Rittsel  Sweden DNF
  Serhiy Honchar  Ukraine DNF
  Gregorio Bare  Uruguay DNF
 
 
Date  17 Jan 2013

IOC Statement on Lance Armstrong

Following the recent decisions of USADA and the UCI regarding the competitive cycling results of Lance Armstrong, the IOC has disqualified Armstrong from the events in which he competed at the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games, namely, the men’s individual road race, where he finished 13th, and the men’s individual time trial, where he finished 3rd and was awarded with a bronze medal and a certificate.

The IOC has asked that the medal and certificate be returned by Armstrong to the United States Olympic Committee, which should forward them to the IOC. The decision was taken in principle at the IOC Executive Board meeting in December, but its implementation required the expiration of the appeal deadline.
 

 

 

Men's Individual Time Trial

Host City: Sydney, Australia
Venue(s): Cycling Road Course, Centennial Parklands, Sydney, New South Wales
Date Started: September 30, 2000
Date Finished: September 30, 2000
Format: 46.8 km. (29.1 miles). 

Summary

Three days before this event, Germany’s [Jan Ullrich] had won the road race. One of the world’s top road racers, the winner of the Tour de France in 1997, Ullrich was a time trial specialist and was the favorite. His biggest competition was expected to come from [Lance Armstrong]. Armstrong had competed in both the 1992 and 1996 Olympics, but had not yet an Olympic medal. Shortly after the 1996 Olympics, he was discovered to have testicular cancer, which had metastasized to his brain and liver. Enduring long courses of chemotherapy, and several surgeries, his return to the professional peloton was in doubt. But return he did, winning the Tour de France in both 1999 and 2000, with Ullrich second in 2000, and Armstrong would eventually win the race seven consecutive times – 1999-2005. Also formidable in the time trial, the race was expected to come down to these two, and they were the last two riders off. The 25th rider to start, of 38, was Russian [Vyacheslav Yekimov]. Yekimov, a 1988 gold medalist in the team pursuit and former world champion in the individual pursuit, was now a top professional road racer, and had served as a capable lieutenant on Armstrong’s US Postal Service team. He had a very long career and in the late 80s, had been the top individual pursuiter in the world for the Soviet Union. When Yekimov started the time trial, the leader was Kazakh [Andrey Teteryuk] but Yekimov finished in 57:40, besting Teteryuk by over a minute. And the time held up as numerous top pros had failed to better it by the time Armstrong and Ullrich started. At the first checkpoint, they trailed Yekimov’s time, and they were never able to get ahead of him, as Yekimov won a very surprising gold medal, with Ullrich second and Armstrong seemingly winning his only Olympic medal, a bronze.

Even though Armstrong was the dominant cyclist of the decade whispers of drug use continued to haunt him. He may have retired with the reputation intact but the United States Anti-Doping agency were hard on his trail. In August 2012 they announced that their long investigation had concluded that he had used illegal performance-enhancing drugs from 1998 onwards and they voided his results for the period of his greatest successes including all his Tour De France victories. His Olympic medal was also forfeited.

 On the same day, beginning at noon, the first of three waves set off on the last cycling event of the 2000 Olympic Games, the men's individual time trial. Cooled by light winds, record crowds turned out on a sunny Sydney Saturday to see the riders cover three laps, a total distance of 46.8 km.
Thirty-four-year-old Viacheslav Ekimov of the Russian Federation, with his movie star good looks, set the fastest time and won the gold medal. Affectionately known as Eki, he finished in 57:40 at an average speed of 48.69 kph. Reaching speeds over 80 kph, riders were oblivious to the normal road traffic signs along the route – which cautioned no speed in excess of 40 kph. At the finish line, the noise of the media helicopters above was so loud that the commentator could barely be heard as photo journalists jockeyed for positions almost as fiercely as the riders had on the course.
It was Ekimov's second gold medal, the first won in 1988 in the team pursuit. Asked to compare the two, he commented, "This is a top honour for a sportsman. It's like being on Everest." Further pressed by the media to articulate how it felt to beat two-time Tour de France winner Lance Armstrong, Ekimov graciously added, "To me, Lance Armstrong is a hero."
Pre-race favourite Armstrong, representing the USA, who races on the same professional team as the Russian, finished with a bronze. He commented, "There are no excuses. I gave it everything. I got third place. Two riders were ahead of me and they were better than me today." Given a low chance of survival from cancer four years ago, Armstrong is not just one of sport's most inspirational stories but one of life's.
Jan Ullrich of Germany won silver in the individual time trial and was content that he'd won gold in the road race. "I'm totally happy with my Olympics. I hadn't expected to get a medal here," he said.
Although there was not the prize money that these athletes have become accustomed to, the pride and glory of winning an Olympic medal was more than enough incentive for each rider to compete at his maximum level.

These are the official results of the Men's Individual Time Trial at the 2000 Summer Olympics in Sydney, Australia. The race was held on Saturday, September 30, 2000 with a race distance of 46.8 km.

On 17 January 2013 Lance Armstrong was stripped of the bronze medal and disqualified by the International Olympic Committee for an anti-doping rule violation. They also decided not to award Spanish cyclist Abraham Olano the medal, as he had also tested positive for doping, back in 1998.
 
Name Country Time Difference
Goud Vyacheslav Jekimov Vlag van Rusland RUS 57.40,420 -
Zilver Jan Ullrich Vlag van Duitsland GER 57.48,333 +00 "08"
DSQ Lance Armstrong Vlag van Verenigde Staten USA 58.14,267 +00 "34"
4 Abraham Olano Vlag van Spanje ESP 58.31,647 +00 "51"
5 Laurent Jalabert Vlag van Frankrijk FRA 58.44.455 +01 "04"
6 Andrej Teterioek Vlag van Kazachstan KAZ 58.52.342 +01 "12"
7 Thor Hushovd Vlag van Noorwegen NOR 59.00.015 +01 "20"
8 Santos González Vlag van Spanje ESP 59.03.202 +01 "23"
9 Serhiy Honchar Vlag van Oekraïne UKR 59.20,611 +01 "40"
10 Tyler Hamilton Vlag van Verenigde Staten USA 59.26.548 +01 "46"
11 Chris Boardman Vlag van Verenigd Koninkrijk GBR 59.32.230 +01 "52"
12 Andreas Klöden Vlag van Duitsland GER 59.33.971 +01 "53"
13 Christophe Moreau Vlag van Frankrijk FRA 59.37.062 +01 "58"
14 Yevgeni Petrov Vlag van Rusland RUS 59.40.690 +02 "00"
15 Raivis Belohvoščiks Vlag van Letland LAT 59.57.852 +02 "17"
16 David Millar Vlag van Verenigd Koninkrijk GBR 01: 00.17.708 +02 "37"
17 Eugen Wacker Vlag van Kirgizië KGZ 01: 00.21.925 +02 "41"
18 Serhij Matvjejev Vlag van Oekraïne UKR 01: 00.25.933 +02 "45"
19 Nathan O'Neill Vlag van Australië AUS 01: 00.32.749 +02 "52"
20 Eric Wohlberg Vlag van Canada CAN 01: 00.34.353 +02 "54"
21 Dainis Ozols Vlag van Letland LAT 01: 00.46.390 +03 '06 "
22 Martin Hvastija Vlag van Slovenië SLO 01: 01.08.831 +03 '27 "
23 Raimondas Rumšas Vlag van Litouwen LTU 01: 01.08,954 +03 "28"
24 Víctor Hugo Peña Vlag van Colombia COL 01: 01.10.518 +03 '30 "
25 Artūras Kasputis Vlag van Litouwen LTU 01: 01.22,794 +03 '42 "
26 Koos Moerenhout Vlag van Nederland NED 01: 01.27,159 +03 '46 "
27 Aleksandr Vinokurov Vlag van Kazachstan KAZ 01: 01.34.259 +03 '54 "
28 Tomáš Konečný Vlag van Tsjechië CZE 01: 01.36.565 +03 '56 "
29 Erik Dekker Vlag van Nederland NED 01: 01.40.363 +04 "00"
30 Martin Rittsel Vlag van Zweden SWE 01: 01.59.765 +04 '19 "
31 Piotr Wadecki Vlag van Polen POL 01: 02.04,653 +04 "24"
32 Lauri Aus Vlag van Estland EST 01: 02.16.275 +04 "36"
33 Alex Zülle Vlag van Zwitserland SUI 01: 02.34.088 +04 "54"
34 René Haselbacher Vlag van Oostenrijk AUT 01: 02.38,328 +04 "58"
35 Vitor-Manuel Gamito Vlag van Portugal POR 01: 03.16.742 +05 "36"
36 Amer El-Nady Vlag van Egypte EGY 01: 03.18.318 +05 "38"
37 Michael Andersson Vlag van Zweden SWE 01: 05.19.037 +07 "39"
Not finished
- Michael Sandstød Vlag van Denemarken DEN    
Name 7.5 km 15.6 km 23.1 km 31.2 km 38.7 km 46.8 km
Vlag van Rusland Vyacheslav Jekimov 9.35 19.08 28.51 38.28 48.20 57.40
Vlag van Duitsland Jan Ullrich 9.35 19.11 28.56 38.34 48.14 57.48
Vlag van Verenigde Staten Lance Armstrong 9.36 19.09 28.55 38.36 48.27 58.14
Vlag van Spanje Abraham Olano 9.42 19.22 29.14 38.57 48.48 58.31
Vlag van Frankrijk Laurent Jalabert 9.40 19.31 29.14 39.07 48.59 58.44
Vlag van Kazachstan Andrej Teterioek 9.50 19.40   39.29 49.17 58.52
Vlag van Noorwegen Thor Hushovd 9.40 19.23 29.27 39.19 49.19 59.00
Vlag van Spanje Santos González   19.38 29.36 39.22 49.11 59.03
Vlag van Oekraïne Serhiy Honchar 9.48 19.38 29.33 39.29 49.29 59.20
Vlag van Verenigde Staten Tyler Hamilton 9.50 19.33 29.36 39.32 49.32 59.26
Vlag van Verenigd Koninkrijk Chris Boardman 9.50 19.41 29.45 39.39 49.43 59.32
Vlag van Duitsland Andreas Klöden 9.49 19.41 29.43 39.33 49.41 59.33
Vlag van Frankrijk Christophe Moreau 10.02   30.25 40.01   59.38
Vlag van Rusland Yevgeni Petrov 9.48 19.40 29.38 39.33 49.38 59.40
Vlag van Letland Raivis Belohvoščiks 9.50 20.38 29.51 39.52 50.05 59.57
Vlag van Verenigd Koninkrijk David Millar 9.52 19.54 30.06 40.10 50.18 01: 00.17
Vlag van Kirgizië Eugen Wacker 9.56 19.55 30.00 40.03 50.15 01: 00.21
Vlag van Oekraïne Serhij Matvjejev 9.56 19.59 30.11 40.10 50.24 01: 00.25
Vlag van Australië Nathan O'Neill 9.54 19.56 30.07 40.17 50.34 01: 00.32
Vlag van Canada Eric Wohlberg 9.54 19.58 30.09 40.14 50.33 01: 00.34
Vlag van Letland Dainis Ozols 9.50 19.53 30.04 40.11 50.31 01: 00.46
Vlag van Litouwen Raimondas Rumšas 10.06 20.13 30.30 40.36 51.02 01: 01.07
Vlag van Slovenië Martin Hvastija 9.50 19.44 30.03 40.20 50.52 01: 01.08
Vlag van Colombia Víctor Hugo Peña 10.06 20.06 30.21 40.34   01: 01.10
Vlag van Litouwen Artūras Kasputis 10.01 20.04 30.20 40.36 51.09 01: 01.22
Vlag van Nederland Koos Moerenhout 9.54 20.06 30.27 40.47 51.10 01: 01.26
Vlag van Kazachstan Aleksandr Vinokurov   20.21 30.52   51.13 01: 01.34
Vlag van Tsjechië Tomáš Konečný 10.12 20.35 30.54 41.07 51.22 01: 01.36
Vlag van Nederland Erik Dekker 10.02 20.18 30.38 40.49 51.15 01: 01.40
Vlag van Zweden Martin Rittsel   20.25   41.18   01: 01.59
Vlag van Polen Piotr Wadecki 10.13 20.33 31.05 41.27   01: 02.04
Vlag van Estland Lauri Aus 10.13 20.32 31.03 41.20 51.57 01: 02.16
Vlag van Zwitserland Alex Zülle 10.18 20.35   40.10 51.59 01: 02.34
Vlag van Oostenrijk René Haselbacher 10.13 20.30 30.59 41.43 52.16 01: 02.38
Vlag van Portugal Vitor-Manuel Gamito 10.07 20.44 31.35 41.51 52.37 01: 03.16
Vlag van Egypte Amr El-Nady 10.12 20.36 31.05 41.33 52.36 01: 03.18
Vlag van Zweden Michael Andersson 10.35 21.52 34.09 42.54 54.08 01: 05.19
Vlag van Denemarken Michael Sandstød 9.54 20.04 30.36 41.04 51.53 DNF
 
 

Women's Road Race, Individual

 Host City: Sydney, Australia
Venue(s): Cycling Road Course, Centennial Parklands, Sydney, New South Wales
Date Started: September 26, 2000
Date Finished: September 26, 2000
Format: 119.7 km. (74.3 miles) mass start race.

Summary

Defending champion [Jeannie Longo] was back for her fifth Olympics. But the dead flat course did not allow her or any rider to break open the field, and it came down to a field sprint. Finishing in Sydney downpour, the winner was the Dutch rider [Leontien Zijlaard-Van Moorsel] over Germany's [Hanka Kupfernagel]. Zijlaard-Van Moorsel's performance at the 2000 Olympics rivals any in cycling history. She won the road race, the individual time trial, the 3,000 metre individual pursuit on the track, and won a silver medal in the points race on the track. She won the World Championships on the roads in 1991 and 1993, and in the Time Trial in 1998-99, and was a four-time individual pursuit World Champion (1990, 2001-03). Her career occurred in two phases. After 1993, she suffered from anorexia nervosa and lost almost 20 kg. (44 lbs.). But she recovered and returned to international cycling in the late 90s to enjoy her greatest successes.

 On the first day of the road cycling competition, 26 September, the women competing in the road race were subject to the first of two downpours that hit the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games. In dreadful conditions, all but eight of the 57 starters completed the full seven laps of the 119.7 km race, with slippery roads proving a hazard. The riders appeared undeterred by the driving rain and wind, however, maintaining an average speed of 38.51 km per hour.
Leontien Zijlaard of the Netherlands was the first across the line in 3:06:31. Usually recognised as the glamorous face of the sport, she was covered from head to toe in mud as she raised her arms in victory. It was the second of three gold medals of these Olympic Games for Zijlaard, who dominated the cycling. She had already taken gold in the individual pursuit, where she set world and Olympic records and won silver in the point race.
In an extremely close finish, the next 23 competitors came in so close that they were each credited the same time as the winner. Hanka Kupfernagel of Germany took silver with Diana Ziliute of Lithuania claiming bronze. Unfortunately for the women, the crowds were sparse, due to the inclement weather.
 The women's road race was one of the cycling events at the 2000 Summer Olympics. The race was held on Tuesday, 26 September 2000 with a race distance of 119.7 km. Because the top three were so close there was a photo finish.

Results

Final classification

RANK CYCLIST NATION TIME
1 Leontien Zijlaard  Netherlands 3:06:31
2 Hanka Kupfernagel  Germany
3 Diana Žiliūtė  Lithuania
4 Anna Willson  Australia
5 Svetlana Bubnenkova  Russia
6 Magali le Floc'h  France
7 Zoulfia Zabirova  Russia
8 Heide van de Vijver  Belgium
9 Yvonne Schnorf  Switzerland
10 Sara Symington  Great Britain
11 Genevieve Jeanson  Canada
12 Mirjam Melchers  Netherlands
13 Rasa Polikevičiūtė  Lithuania
14 Joane Somarriba Arrola  Spain
15 Alessandra Cappellotto  Italy
16 Nicole Brändli  Switzerland
17 Tetyana Styazhkina  Ukraine
18 Jacinta Coleman  New Zealand
19 Oksana Saprykina  Ukraine
20 Cindy Pieters  Belgium
21 Pia Sundstedt  Finland
22 Lyne Bessette  Canada
23 Tracey Gaudry  Australia
24 Yvonne McGregor  Great Britain
25 Edita Pučinskaitė  Lithuania + 0:06
26 Jeannie Longo-Ciprelli  France
27 Ceris Gilfillan  Great Britain
28 Juanita Feldhahn  Australia
29 Monica Valen  Norway + 1:31
30 Petra Rossner  Germany + 2:46
31 Valeria Cappellotto  Italy
32 Priska Doppmann  Switzerland + 3:46
33 Valentyna Karpenko  Ukraine + 4:02
34 Fatima Blazquez Lozano  Spain
35 Ingunn Bollerud  Norway
36 Roz Reekie-May  New Zealand + 4:03
37 Chantal Beltman  Netherlands
38 Solrun Flatås  Norway + 4:33
39 Catherine Marsal  France
40 Vanja Vonckx  Belgium + 6:09
41 Miho Oki  Japan
42 Olga Slioussareva  Russia + 6:56
43 Clara Hughes  Canada + 10:18
44 Cláudia Carceroni-Saintagne  Brazil + 17:48
45 Chen Chiung-Yi  Chinese Taipei + 21:29
46 Dania Perez  Cuba + 21:57
47 Nicole Freedman  United States
48 Maria Cagigas  Spain + 21:58
49 Janildas Silva  Brazil + 28:41
  Yoanka González  Cuba DNF
  Ina-Yoko Teutenberg  Germany DNF
  Deirdre Murphy  Ireland DNF
  Roberta Bonanomi  Italy DNF
  Susy Pryde  New Zealand DNF
  Bianca Jane Netzler  Samoa DNF
  Mari Holden  United States DNF
  Karen Kurreck  United States DNF
 

Summary

The Netherlands' [Leontien Zijlaard-van Moorsel] had had an up and down career. In 1991 and 1993 she was World Champion on the road, and won the 1992-93 Tour de France Féminine. But she withdrew from competition, suffering from anorexia nervosa and depression. She returned to international competition in 1998, winning the time trial World Championships in 1998-99. She entered the time trial in Sydney as the favorite and her entire 2000 Olympics was the stuff of wonder. She would win the time trial by a comfortable 37-second margin over surprising American [Mari Holden]. She would also win gold in Sydney in the individual pursuit and the road race, and added a fourth medal, silver, in the points race. After the Olympics, Holden won the World Championship in this event, although Zijlaard-van Moorsel did not compete. [Jeannie Longo-Ciprelli], the bronze medalist, is the greatest female road cyclist ever, with a huge list of palmares. She was World Champion in this event in 1995-97 and would win again in 2001. Holden had not raced much internationally but later in 2000 she would win the World Time Trial Championship.

 

Women's Individual Time Trial

 Host City: Sydney, Australia
Venue(s): Cycling Road Course, Centennial Parklands, Sydney, New South Wales
Date Started: September 30, 2000
Date Finished: September 30, 2000
Format: 31.2 km. (19.4 miles).

Summary

The Netherlands' [Leontien Zijlaard-van Moorsel] had had an up and down career. In 1991 and 1993 she was World Champion on the road, and won the 1992-93 Tour de France Feminine. But she withdrew from competition, suffering from anorexia nervosa and depression. She returned to international competition in 1998, winning the time trial World Championships in 1998-99. She entered the time trial in Sydney as the favorite and her entire 2000 Olympics was the stuff of wonder. She would win the time trial by a comfortable 37-second margin over surprising American [Mari Holden]. She would also win gold in Sydney in the individual pursuit and the road race, and added a fourth medal, silver, in the points race. After the Olympics, Holden won the World Championship in this event, although Zijlaard-van Moorsel did not compete. [Jeannie Longo-Ciprelli], the bronze medalist, is the greatest female road cyclist ever, with a huge list of palmares. She was World Champion in this event in 1995-97 and would win again in 2001. Holden had not raced much internationally but later in 2000 she would win the World Time Trial Championship.

In the women's individual time trial on 30 September, road race gold medallist Leontien Zijlaard of the Netherlands did what no other cyclist had done before, when she won a third gold and fourth medal at a single Olympic Games. She convincingly won the two-lap, 31.2 km trial in 42:00 minutes flat. In relentlessly strong cycling, she was a clear 37 seconds ahead of Mari Holden of the USA and 52 seconds ahead of bronze medallist 41-year-old veteran Jeannie Longo-Ciprelli of France, who was impressively competing in her fifth Olympic Games. Zijlaard increased her lead at every intermediate time check before powering home, with the bright orange colour of the Netherlands' team filling her rear wheel. "If someone would have told me I would win three gold medals in the Olympics I wouldn't have believed it!" Zijlaard said after the race. 
 
Name Country Time Difference
Goud Leontien Zijlaard-Van Moorsel Vlag van Nederland NED 42.00.781 -
Zilver Mari Holden Vlag van Verenigde Staten USA 42: 37,372 +00 "37"
Brons Jeannie Longo-Ciprelli Vlag van Frankrijk FRA 42: 52,547 +00 "52"
4 Anna Wilson Vlag van Australië AUS 42: 58,828 +00 "58"
5 Joane Somarriba Vlag van Spanje ESP 43: 06,620 +01 '06 "
6 Clara Hughes Vlag van Canada CAN 43: 12,528 +01 "12"
7 Judith Arndt Vlag van Duitsland GER 43: 31,752 +01 "31"
8 Hanka Kupfernagel Vlag van Duitsland GER 43: 37,943 +01 "37"
9 Diana Žiliūtė Vlag van Litouwen LTU 43: 39,997 +01 "39"
10 Edita Pučinskaitė Vlag van Litouwen LTU 43: 48,646 +01 "48"
11 Mirjam Melchers Vlag van Nederland NED 44: 12,876 +02 "12"
12 Zoelfia Zabirova Vlag van Rusland RUS 44: 22,355 +02 "22"
13 Catherine Marsal Vlag van Frankrijk FRA 44: 27,135 +02 "27"
14 Ceris Gilfillan Vlag van Verenigd Koninkrijk GBR 44: 29.104 +02 "29"
15 Geneviève Jeanson Vlag van Canada CAN 44: 32,500 +02 "32"
16 Karen Kurreck Vlag van Verenigde Staten USA 44: 33,379 +02 "33"
17 Yvonne McGregor Vlag van Verenigd Koninkrijk GBR 44: 37,095 +02 "37"
18 Teodora Ruano Vlag van Spanje ESP 44: 37,369 +02 "37"
19 Tetiana Stiazhkina Vlag van Oekraïne UKR 44: 45.134 +02 "45"
20 Solrun Flatås Vlag van Noorwegen NOR 45: 01.575 +03 '01 "
21 Tracey Watson-Gaudry Vlag van Australië AUS 45: 11,020 +03 "11"
22 Nicole Brändli-Sedoun Vlag van Zwitserland SUI 45: 16,764 +03 '16 "
23 Olga Slioussareva Vlag van Rusland RUS 45: 51,099 +03 "51"
Not started
- Alessandra Cappellotto Vlag van Italië ITA    
 
Name 7.5 km 15.6 km 23.1 km 31.2 km
Vlag van Nederland Leontien Zijlaard-Van Moorsel 10.14 20.46 31.31 42.00
Vlag van Verenigde Staten Mari Holden 10.32 21.12 31.59 42.37
Vlag van Frankrijk Jeannie Longo-Ciprelli 10.47 21.28 32.16 42.52
Vlag van Australië Anna Wilson 10.38 21.14 32.18 42.58
Vlag van Spanje Joane Somarriba 10.28 21.31 32.23 43.06
Vlag van Canada Clara Hughes 10.47 21.39 32.26 43.12
Vlag van Duitsland Judith Arndt 10.40 21.40 32.38 43.31
Vlag van Duitsland Hanka Kupfernagel 10.44 21.41 32.50 43.35
Vlag van Litouwen Diana Žiliūtė 10.51 21.49 32.48 43.39
Vlag van Litouwen Edita Pučinskaitė 10.53 21.58 32.55 43.48
Vlag van Nederland Mirjam Melchers 10.40 21.50 33.05 44.12
Vlag van Rusland Zoelfia Zabirova 10.59 10 p.m. 33.13 44.22
Vlag van Frankrijk Catherine Marsal 11.06 22.12 33.22 44.27
Vlag van Verenigd Koninkrijk Ceris Gilfillan 10.58 22.08 33.19 44.29
Vlag van Canada Geneviève Jeanson 10.52 22.06 33.23 44.32
Vlag van Verenigde Staten Karen Kurreck 11.06 22.08 33.27 44.33
Vlag van Verenigd Koninkrijk Yvonne McGregor 11.07 22.07 33.26 44.37
Vlag van Spanje Teodora Ruano 11.15 22.24 33.34 44.37
Vlag van Oekraïne Tetyana Stiajkina 11.03 22.19 33.31 44.45
Vlag van Noorwegen Solrun Flatås 10.58 22.12 33.40 45.01
Vlag van Australië Tracey Watson-Gaudry 11.06 22.24 33.48 45.11
Vlag van Zwitserland Nicole Brändli-Sedoun 11.08 22.35 33.56 45.16
Vlag van Rusland Olga Slioussareva 11.24 22.56 34.33 45.51
 

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