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2012 London Summer Olympics

2012 Summer Olympics - The Results (Swimming - Women part 1)

Swimming at the 2012 London Summer Games

 

 swimming2012

Host City: London, Great Britain
Date Started: July 28, 2012
Date Finished: August 4, 2012
Events: 34

Participants: 931 (481 men and 450 women) from 167 countries
Youngest Participant: TOG Adzo Kpossi (13 years, 191 days)
Oldest Participant: SWE Lars Frolander (38 years, 69 days)
Most Medals (Athlete): USA Michael Phelps (6 medals)
Most Medals (Country): USA United States (31 medals)

Overview

Swimming was held at the newly constructed Aquatics Centre in the Olympic Park, although the open water swims were held in at The Serpentine, the easteNR part of a lake in Hyde Park. The sport was again highlighted by the presence of [Michael Phelps], who had won eight gold medals at the Beijing Olympics, and came to London having won 16 medals in all. He was not quite as dominant in London, winning six medals, and four gold medals, but this brought his overall totals to 22 medals and 14 golds, both all-time Olympic records. There was no change to the swimming program since the 2008 Olympics, with men and women both contesting 17 events, 16 in the pool and the open-water swim.

The United States was the dominant nation, winning 16 of 34 gold medals, and 31 medals in all. Phelps won the most medals by any swimmer, while on the women’s side, Americans [Missy Franklin] and [Allison Schmitt] won five medals, with Franklin winning four golds and Schmitt three. In the men’s open-water swim Tunisia’s [Ousmane Mellouli] won the gold medal. He also won a bronze medal in the pool in the 1,500 freestyle, an event he had won in 2008, making him the first swimmer to win gold medals both in the pool and open-water events.

Multiple world records were set in London swimming, which reversed the trend of the last few years. Beijing had seen the world record list assaulted as swimmers used skinsuits made from new fabrics and which greatly decreased drag in the water. These were banned after the 2008 Olympics and with the retuNR to what are termed textile suits, world records had been dearly sought since 2008. But the level of competition and the hyper-fast London pool contributed to numerous changes in the world lists.

The swimming competitions at the 2012 Summer Olympics in London took place from 28 July to 4 August at the Aquatics Centre. The open-water competition took place from 9 to 10 August in Hyde Park.

Swimming featured 34 events (17 male, 17 female), including two 10 km open-water marathons in Hyde Park's Serpentine Lake. The remaining 32 were contested in a 50 m long course pool within the Olympic Park.

United States claimed a total of 31 medals (16 golds, 9 silver, and 6 bronze) in the leaderboard to maintain its supremacy as the most successful nation in swimming. Brought by an unprecedented sporting domination, Michael Phelps emerged as the most decorated Olympian of all time after winning six more medals at these Games to bring his total after the 2012 games to 22 (18 golds, 2 silver, and 2 bronze). Battling against the Americans for an overall medal count, China mounted to an unexpected second-place effort on the leaderboard with a tally of 10 medals (five golds, three silver, and bronze) after striking a superb double from Sun Yang in long-distance freestyle (both 400 and 1500 m) and Ye Shiwen in the individual medley (both 200 and 400 m). Meanwhile, France ended on a spectacular fashion in third spot with a total of seven medals (four golds, two silver, and one bronze), followed by the Netherlands with four, including two golds from Ranomi Kromowidjojo in sprint freestyle (both 50 and 100 m), and South Africa with three.

For the first time since 1992, Australia delivered an underwhelming performance with only a single triumph in the freestyle relay, but managed to bring home a total of ten medals. After not winning a gold in swimming since 2004, Japan produced the most medals in the post-war era to build a tally of eleven (three silver and eight bronze).

In the post-techsuit era, a total of nine world records and twenty five Olympic records were set during the competition.

Schedule

Similar to the previous Olympics since 2000, with the exception of 2008, swimming program schedule occurred in two segments. For the pool events, prelims were held in the moNRing, with semifinals and final in the following evening session.

Legend
H Heats ½ Semifinals F Final
  
Women
Date → Jul 28 Jul 29 Jul 30 Jul 31 Aug 1 Aug 2 Aug 3 Aug 4 Aug 9
Event ↓ M E M E M E M E M E M E M E M E M E
50 m freestyle             H ½   F  
100 m freestyle         H ½   F      
200 m freestyle     H ½   F          
400 m freestyle   H F              
800 m freestyle           H     F    
100 m backstroke   H ½   F            
200 m backstroke           H ½   F    
100 m breaststroke   H ½   F            
200 m breaststroke         H ½   F      
100 m butterfly H ½   F              
200 m butterfly       H ½   F        
200 m individual medley     H ½   F          
400 m individual medley H F                
4×100 m freestyle relay H F                
4×200 m freestyle relay         H F        
4×100 m medley relay             H     F  
10 km open water                 F  

Qualification

FINA By-Law BL 9.3.6.4 (swimming) and BL 9.3.7.5.3 (open water) lays out the qualification procedures for the "Swimming" competition at the Olympics. Each country is allowed to enter up to two swimmers per individual event (provided they qualify), and one entry per relay; and a country may not have more than 26 males and 26 females (52 total) on its team.

Swimming – individual events

On 11 November 2010, FINA posted the qualifying times for individual events for the 2012 Olympics. The time standards consist of two time standards, an "Olympic Qualifying Time" and an "Olympic invitation time". Each country was able to enter up to two swimmers per event, provided both swimmers met the (faster) qualifying time. A country was able to enter one swimmer per event that met the invitation standard. Any swimmer who met the "qualifying" time was entered in the event for the Games; a swimmer meeting the "invitation" standard was eligible for entry, and their entry was allotted/filled in by ranking.

If a country has no swimmers meeting either qualifying standard, it may enter one male and one female. A country that does not receive an allocation spot but has at least one swimmer who meets a qualifying standard may enter the swimmer with the highest ranking.

Swimming – relay events

Each relay event featured 16 teams, composed of:

  • 12: the top-12 finishers at the 2011 World Championships in each relay event.
  • 4: the 4 fastest non-qualified teams, based on times in the 15-months preceding the Olympics.

Open-water swimming

The men's and women's 10 km races at the 2012 Olympics each featured 25 swimmers:

  • 10: the top-10 finishers in the 10 km races at the 2011 World Championships
  • 9: the top-9 finishers at the 2012 Olympic Marathon Swim Qualifier (8–9 June 2012 in Setúbal, Portugal).
  • 5: one representative from each FINA continent (Africa, Americas, Asia, Europe and Oceania). (These were selected based on the finishes at the qualifying race in Setúbal.)
  • 1: from the host nation (Great Britain) if not qualified by other means. If Great Britain already had a qualifier in the race, this spot was allocated back into the general pool from the 2012 qualifying race.

Participating nations

FINA announced in early July 2012 that 631 athletes from 166 nations would compete in swimming events at the 2012 Olympics (note: all nations qualified for the 10 km races also had at least 1 swimmer qualified for the pool portion). 59 nations qualified via the A cut (OQT), 12 via the B cut (OST) and 95 via Universality.[12] Brunei, Central African Republic, Djibouti, Ethiopia, Lesotho, Liechtenstein, Togo, and Tonga made their official debut in swimming. Meanwhile, Grenada, Iraq, and Saint Vincent and the Grenadines retuNRed to the sport after an eight-year absence. Nations with swimmers at the Games are (team size in parentheses):
  •  Albania (2)
  •  Algeria (1)
  •  American Samoa (2)
  •  Andorra (2)
  •  Angola (2)
  •  Antigua and Barbuda (2)
  •  Argentina (4)
  •  Armenia (2)
  •  Aruba (2)
  •  Australia (47)
  •  Austria (11)
  •  Azerbaijan (2)
  •  Bahamas (1)
  •  Bahrain (2)
  •  Bangladesh (1)
  •  Barbados (1)
  •  Belarus (8)
  •  Belgium (13)
  •  Benin (1)
  •  Bermuda (1)
  •  Bolivia (2)
  •  Bosnia and Herzegovina (2)
  •  Brazil (19)
  •  Brunei (1)
  •  Bulgaria (4)
  •  Burkina Faso (2)
  •  Burundi (2)
  •  Cambodia (2)
  •  Cameroon (2)
  •  Canada (33)
  •  Cayman Islands (2)
  •  Central African Republic (1)
  •  Chile (1)
  •  China (51)
  •  Colombia (3)
  •  Comoros (1)
  •  Republic of the Congo (2)
  •  Cook Islands (2)
  •  Costa Rica (2)
  •  Ivory Coast (2)
  •  Croatia (4)
  •  Cuba (2)

 

  •  Cyprus (1)
  •  Czech Republic (6)
  •  Denmark (10)
  •  Djibouti (1)
  •  Dominican Republic (2)
  •  Ecuador (3)
  •  Egypt (3)
  •  El Salvador (2)
  •  Estonia (2)
  •  Ethiopia (2)
  •  Fiji (2)
  •  Finland (7)
  •  France (31)
  •  Georgia (1)
  •  Germany (30)
  •  Great Britain (44)
  •  Greece (14)
  •  Grenada (1)
  •  Guam (3)
  •  Guatemala (1)
  •  Guinea (1)
  •  Guyana (2)
  •  Honduras (2)
  •  Hong Kong (3)
  •  Hungary (32)
  •  Iceland (7)
  •  India (1)
  •  Indonesia (1)
  •  Iran (1)
  •  Iraq (1)
  •  Ireland (4)
  •  Israel (5)
  •  Italy (35)
  •  Jamaica (1)
  •  Japan (29)
  •  Jordan (2)
  •  Kazakhstan (7)
  •  Kenya (2)
  •  South Korea (15)
  •  Kuwait (2)
  •  Kyrgyzstan (2)
  •  Laos (1)

 

  •  Latvia (2)
  •  Lebanon (2)
  •  Lesotho (1)
  •  Libya (1)
  •  Liechtenstein (1)
  •  Lithuania (4)
  •  Luxembourg (1)
  •  Macedonia (2)
  •  Madagascar (2)
  •  Malawi (1)
  •  Malaysia (2)
  •  Maldives (2)
  •  Mali (2)
  •  Malta (2)
  •  Mauritius (2)
  •  Marshall Islands (2)
  •  Mexico (9)
  •  Federated States of Micronesia (2)
  •  Moldova (2)
  •  Monaco (1)
  •  Mongolia (2)
  •  Morocco (1)
  •  Mozambique (2)
  •  Nepal (2)
  •  Netherlands (15)
  •  New Zealand (17)
  •  Nicaragua (2)
  •  Niger (1)
  •  Norway (3)
  •  Pakistan (2)
  •  Palau (1)
  •  Palestine (2)
  •  Panama (1)
  •  Papua New Guinea (2)
  •  Paraguay (2)
  •  Peru (3)
  •  Philippines (2)
  •  Poland (19)
  •  Portugal (7)
  •  Puerto Rico (2)
  •  Qatar (2)
  •  Romania (4)

 

  •  Russia (35)
  •  Rwanda (2)
  •  Saint Lucia (1)
  •  Saint Vincent and the Grenadines (1)
  •  San Marino (1)
  •  Senegal (2)
  •  Serbia (8)
  •  Seychelles (2)
  •  Singapore (5)
  •  Slovakia (5)
  •  Slovenia (12)
  •  South Africa (20)
  •  Spain (14)
  •  Sri Lanka (2)
  •  Sudan (2)
  •  Suriname (2)
  •  Swaziland (1)
  •  Sweden (12)
  •  Switzerland (7)
  •  Syria (2)
  •  Chinese Taipei (3)
  •  Tajikistan (1)
  •  Tanzania (2)
  •  Thailand (2)
  •  Togo (1)
  •  Tonga (1)
  •  Trinidad and Tobago (1)
  •  Tunisia (4)
  •  Turkey (6)
  •  Turkmenistan (2)
  •  Uganda (2)
  •  Ukraine (14)
  •  United Arab Emirates (1)
  •  United States (49)
  •  Uruguay (2)
  •  Uzbekistan (2)
  •  Venezuela (10)
  •  Vietnam (1)
  •  Virgin Islands (1)
  •  Zambia (2)
  •  Zimbabwe (1)

Medal summary (both men & women)

 
Rank Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1  United States (USA) 16 9 6 31
2  China (CHN) 5 2 3 10
3  France (FRA) 4 2 1 7
4  Netherlands (NED) 2 1 1 4
5  South Africa (RSA) 2 1 0 3
6  Hungary (HUN) 2 0 1 3
7  Australia (AUS) 1 6 3 10
8  Tunisia (TUN) 1 0 1 2
9  Lithuania (LTU) 1 0 0 1
10  Japan (JPN) 0 3 8 11
11  Russia (RUS) 0 2 2 4
12  Belarus (BLR) 0 2 0 2
 South Korea (KOR) 0 2 0 2
 Spain (ESP) 0 2 0 2
15  Canada (CAN) 0 1 2 3
 Great Britain (GBR) 0 1 2 3
17  Brazil (BRA) 0 1 1 2
18  Germany (GER) 0 1 0 1
19  Italy (ITA) 0 0 1 1
Totals (19 nations) 34 36 32 102

Note: There were ties for silver in the men's 200 m freestyle and men's 100 m butterfly events.

Results

Women's events

Event Gold Silver Bronze
50 m freestyle Ranomi Kromowidjojo
 Netherlands
24.05 OR Aliaksandra Herasimenia
 Belarus
24.28 NR Marleen Veldhuis
 Netherlands
24.39
100 m freestyle Ranomi Kromowidjojo
 Netherlands
53.00 OR Aliaksandra Herasimenia
 Belarus
53.38 Tang Yi
 China
53.44
200 m freestyle Allison Schmitt
 United States
1:53.61 OR, AM Camille Muffat
 France
1:55.58 Bronte Barratt
 Australia
1:55.81
400 m freestyle Camille Muffat
 France
4:01.45 OR Allison Schmitt
 United States
4:01.77 AM Rebecca Adlington
 Great Britain
4:03.01
800 m freestyle Katie Ledecky
 United States
8:14.63 AM Mireia Belmonte García
 Spain
8:18.76 NR Rebecca Adlington
 Great Britain
8:20.32
 
100 m backstroke Missy Franklin
 United States
58.33 AM Emily Seebohm
 Australia
58.68 Aya Terakawa
 Japan
58.83 AS
200 m backstroke Missy Franklin
 United States
2:04.06 WR Anastasia Zuyeva
 Russia
2:05.92 Elizabeth Beisel
 United States
2:06.55
 
100 m breaststroke Rūta Meilutytė
 Lithuania
1:05.47 Rebecca Soni
 United States
1:05.55 Satomi Suzuki
 Japan
1:06.46
200 m breaststroke Rebecca Soni
 United States
2:19.59 WR Satomi Suzuki
 Japan
2:20.72 =AS Yuliya Yefimova
 Russia
2:20.92 EU
 
100 m butterfly Dana Vollmer
 United States
55.98 WR Lu Ying
 China
56.87 Alicia Coutts
 Australia
56.94
200 m butterfly Jiao Liuyang
 China
2:04.06 OR Mireia Belmonte García
 Spain
2:05.25 NR Natsumi Hoshi
 Japan
2:05.48
 
200 m individual medley Ye Shiwen
 China
2:07.57 OR, AS Alicia Coutts
 Australia
2:08.15 Caitlin Leverenz
 United States
2:08.95
400 m individual medley Ye Shiwen
 China
4:28.43 WR Elizabeth Beisel
 United States
4:31.27 Li Xuanxu
 China
4:32.91
 
4 × 100 m freestyle relay  Australia (AUS)
Alicia Coutts (53.90)
Cate Campbell (53.19)
Brittany Elmslie (53.41)
Melanie Schlanger (52.65)
Emily Seebohm[b]
Yolane Kukla[b]
Libby Trickett[b]
3:33.15 OR  Netherlands (NED)
Inge Dekker (54.67)
Marleen Veldhuis (53.80)
Femke Heemskerk (53.39)
Ranomi Kromowidjojo (51.93)
Hinkelien Schreuder[b]
3:33.79  United States (USA)
Missy Franklin (53.52)
Jessica Hardy (53.53)
Lia Neal (53.65)
Allison Schmitt (53.54)
Amanda Weir[b]
Natalie Coughlin[b]
3:34.24 AM
4 × 200 m freestyle relay  United States (USA)
Missy Franklin (1:55.96)
Dana Vollmer (1:56.02)
Shannon Vreeland (1:56.85)
Allison Schmitt (1:54.09)
Lauren Perdue[b]
Alyssa Anderson[b]
7:42.92 OR, AM  Australia (AUS)
Bronte Barratt (1:55.76)
Melanie Schlanger (1:55.62)
Kylie Palmer (1:56.91)
Alicia Coutts (1:56.12)
Brittany Elmslie[b]
Angie Bainbridge[b]
Jade Neilsen[b]
Blair Evans[b]
7:44.41  France (FRA)
Camille Muffat (1:55.51)
Charlotte Bonnet (1:57.78)
Ophélie-Cyrielle Étienne (1:58.05)
Coralie Balmy (1:56.15)
Margaux Farrell[b]
Mylène Lazare[b]
7:47.49 NR
4 × 100 m medley relay  United States (USA)
Missy Franklin (58.50)
Rebecca Soni (1:04.82)
Dana Vollmer (55.48)
Allison Schmitt (53.25)
Rachel Bootsma[b]
Breeja Larson[b]
Claire Donahue[b]
Jessica Hardy[b]
3:52.05 WR  Australia (AUS)
Emily Seebohm (59.01)
Leisel Jones (1:06.06)
Alicia Coutts (56.41)
Melanie Schlanger (52.54)
Brittany Elmslie[b]
3:54.02  Japan (JPN)
Aya Terakawa (58.99)
Satomi Suzuki (1:05.96)
Yuka Kato (57.36)
Haruka Ueda (53.42)
3:55.73
 
10 km open water Éva Risztov
 Hungary
1:57:38.2 Haley Anderson
 United States
1:57:38.6 Martina Grimaldi
 Italy
1:57:41.8

AF African record | AM Americas record | AS Asian record | ER European record | OC Oceania record | OR Olympic record | WJR World Junior record | WR World record
NR National record (Any world record is necessarily also an Olympic, area, and national record. Area records (for continental regions) are also national records.)

b Swimmers who participated in the heats only and received medals.

Olympic and world records broken

Women

Event Date Round Name Nationality Time Record Day
Women's 100 m butterfly 28 July Heats Dana Vollmer  United States 56.25 OR 1
Women's 400 m individual medley 28 July Final Ye Shiwen  China 4:28.43 WR 1
Women's 4 × 100 m freestyle relay 28 July Final Alicia Coutts (53.90)
Cate Campbell (53.19)
Brittany Elmslie (53.41)
Melanie Schlanger (52.65)
 Australia 3:33.15 OR 1
Women's 100 m backstroke 29 July Heats Emily Seebohm  Australia 58.23 OR 2
Women's 100 m butterfly 29 July Final Dana Vollmer  United States 55.98 WR 2
Women's 400 m freestyle 29 July Final Camille Muffat  France 4:01.45 OR 2
Women's 200 m individual medley 30 July Semifinal Ye Shiwen  China 2:08.39 OR 3
Women's 200 m freestyle 31 July Final Allison Schmitt  United States 1:53.61 OR 4
Women's 200 m individual medley 31 July Final Ye Shiwen  China 2:07.57 OR 4
Women's 100 m freestyle 1 August Semifinal Ranomi Kromowidjojo  Netherlands 53.05 OR 5
Women's 200 m butterfly 1 August Final Jiao Liuyang  China 2:04.06 OR 5
Women's 200 m breaststroke 1 August Semifinal Rebecca Soni  United States 2:20.00 WR 5
Women's 4 × 200 m freestyle relay 1 August Final Missy Franklin (1:55.96)
Dana Vollmer (1:56.02)
Shannon Vreeland (1:56.85)
Allison Schmitt (1:54.09)
 United States 7:42.92 OR 5
Women's 200 m breaststroke 2 August Final Rebecca Soni  United States 2:19.59 WR 6
Women's 100 m freestyle 2 August Final Ranomi Kromowidjojo  Netherlands 53.00 OR 6
Women's 200 m backstroke 3 August Final Missy Franklin  United States 2:04.06 WR 7
Women's 50 m freestyle 4 August Final Ranomi Kromowidjojo  Netherlands 24.05 OR 8
Women's 4 × 100 m medley relay 4 August Final Missy Franklin (58.50)
Rebecca Soni (1:04.82)
Dana Vollmer (55.48)
Allison Schmitt (53.25)
 United States 3:52.05 WR 8
  • All world records (WR) are subsequently Olympic records (OR).

Derya Büyükuncu and Lars Frölander were the first swimmers to participate in six consecutive Olympic Games (1992-2012).

Controversies

In the women's 400-metre individual medley, Chinese Ye Shiwen won in a world-record time of 4:28.43. After the race, Ye had allegations against her suggesting the use of drugs that drew comment from the InteNRational Olympic Committee and FINA who defended Ye. Ye has never tested positive of any performance-enhancing drugs. Some claim the accusations were a result of xenophobia towards the Chinese.

In the final of the 100-metre breaststroke, South African Cameron van der Burgh won in a world-record time of 58.46, bettering the previous record of 58.58 held by Brenton Rickard of Australia. After the race however, underwater camera footage showed winner van der Burgh did three illegal butterfly kicks on the underwater pullout (rules allow for one kick). Van der Burgh later admitted to the illegal move and justified the act by saying if he was not doing it, "you are falling behind or giving yourself a disadvantage."

 

Women's 50 metres Freestyle

 Host City: London, Great Britain
Venue(s): London Aquatics Centre, Olympic Park, Stratford, London
Date Started: August 3, 2012
Date Finished: August 4, 2012

Summary

Sweden's [Therese Alshammar] had won this event at the 2011 World Championships, and the defending gold medalist, German [Britta Steffen], was back, but they were expected to be challenged by Dutchwoman [Ranomi Kromowidjojo], who had already won the 100 freestyle in London. But it was Kromo who won relatively easily, taking the lead from the start and stopping the clock in 24.05 for the gold medal. Behind her teammate [Marleen Veldhuis] appeared ready to give the Netherlands a 1-2 finish but was pipped at the finish by Belarussian [Aleksandra Gerasimenya] for the silver. Steffen just missed the medals in fourth place, nipping out Alshammar in fifth.

Kromowidjojo became the fourth woman to sweep the two sprint freestyles since the 50 was introduced in 1988, joining East German [Kristin Otto] from 1988, her countrywoman [Inge de Bruijn] in 2000, and Steffan at Beijing. Kromowidjojo's unusual name reflects her mixed Dutch-Javanese-Surinamese ethnicity.

The women's 50 metre freestyle event at the 2012 Summer Olympics took place on 3–4 August at the London Aquatics Centre in London, United Kingdom.

Netherlands' Ranomi Kromowidjojo smashed a new Olympic record to strike a fourth sprint freestyle double in history, since East German Kristin Otto did so in 1988, her fellow countrywoman Inge de Bruijn in 2000, and Germany's defending champion Britta Steffen in 2008. She blistered the field with a sterling time and a textile best in 24.05 to slice off Steffen's previous Olympic record by a hundredth of a second (0.01). Belarus' Aliaksandra Herasimenia added a second silver to her Olympic hardware in a national record of 24.28, while Kromowidjojo's teammate Marleen Veldhuis edged out the scorching Steffen (24.46) by 0.07 seconds to snatch the bronze in 24.39, handing over an entire medal haul for the Dutch squad with a one–three finish.

Great Britain's home favorite Francesca Halsall finished behind Steffen by a fingertip with a fifth-place time in 24.47. Meanwhile, Sweden's Therese Alshammar shook off a pinched nerve injury to officially compete in her fifth Olympics, but managed only to claim a sixth spot in 24.61. U.S. swimmer Jessica Hardy (24.62) and the Bahamas' Arianna Vanderpool-Wallace (24.69) rounded out the field in a splash-and-dash finale.

Notable swimmers missed the top-eight final including Aussie sisters Bronte and Cate Campbell, defending bronze medalist; and Halsall's teammate Amy Smith, who finished outside the roster by 16-hundredths of a second with a ninth-place time in 24.87. Earlier on the moNRing prelims, Smith picked up a sixteenth spot in a most exciting three-way swim-off against U.S. sprinter Kara Lynn Joyce and Iceland's Sarah Blake Bateman after they each posted a matching time of 25.28.

Records

Prior to this competition, the existing world and Olympic records were as follows.

World record  Britta Steffen (GER) 23.73 Rome, Italy 2 August 2009
Olympic record  Britta Steffen (GER) 24.06 Beijing, China 17 August 2008

The following records were established during the competition:

Date Event Name Nationality Time Record
August 4 Final Ranomi Kromowidjojo  Netherlands 24.05 OR
 

Final

Rank Lane Name Nationality Time Notes
1st place, gold medalist(s) 4 Ranomi Kromowidjojo  Netherlands 24.05 OR
2nd place, silver medalist(s) 5 Aliaksandra Herasimenia  Belarus 24.28 NR
3rd place, bronze medalist(s) 3 Marleen Veldhuis  Netherlands 24.39  
4 6 Britta Steffen  Germany 24.46  
5 2 Francesca Halsall  Great Britain 24.47  
6 8 Therese Alshammar  Sweden 24.61  
7 1 Jessica Hardy  United States 24.62  
8 7 Arianna Vanderpool-Wallace  Bahamas 24.69  

Semifinals

Semifinal 1

Rank Lane Name Nationality Time Notes
1 4 Marleen Veldhuis  Netherlands 24.50 Q
2 5 Britta Steffen  Germany 24.57 Q
3 6 Arianna Vanderpool-Wallace  Bahamas 24.64 Q, NR
4 7 Jessica Hardy  United States 24.68 Q
5 3 Therese Alshammar  Sweden 24.71 Q
6 8 Amy Smith  Great Britain 24.87  
7 2 Cate Campbell  Australia 25.01  
8 1 Victoria Poon  Canada 25.17  

Semifinal 2

Rank Lane Name Nationality Time Notes
1 4 Ranomi Kromowidjojo  Netherlands 24.07 Q
2 3 Aliaksandra Herasimenia  Belarus 24.45 Q, NR
3 5 Francesca Halsall  Great Britain 24.63 Q
4 2 Bronte Campbell  Australia 24.94  
8 Anna Santamans  France  
6 6 Jeanette Ottesen  Denmark 24.99  
7 7 Sarah Sjöström  Sweden 25.08  
8 1 Theodora Drakou  Greece 25.28  

Qualification swim-off

Rank Lane Name Nationality Time Notes
1 3 Amy Smith  Great Britain 24.82 Q
2 5 Kara Lynn Joyce  United States 25.16  
3 4 Sarah Blake Bateman  Iceland 26.03  

Series

Series 1

Rank Line Name nationality Weather Notes
  4 Nafissatou Moussa Adamou Níger Niger (NIG) 37.29  
1 5 Adzo Kpossi Togo Togo (TOG) 37.55  
3 3 Masempe Theko Lesoto Lesotho (LES) 42.35  

Series 2

Rank Line Name nationality Weather Notes
1 4 Angelika Ouedraogo Burkina Faso Burkina Faso (BUR) 32.19  
1 3 Assita Toure Costa de Marfil Ivory Coast (CIV) 33.09  
3 6 Elsie Uwamahoro Burundi Burundi (BDI) 33.14  
= 1 Aminata Aboubakar Yacoub República del Congo Republic of the Congo (CGO) 33.14  
5 5 Sara Alflaij Baréin Bahrain (BNR) 33.81  
6 7 Mhasin Fadlalla Sudán Sudan (LDS) 35.07  

Series 3

Rank Line Name nationality Weather Notes
1 3 Karin O'Reilly Clashing Antigua y Barbuda Antigua and Barbuda (ANT) 30.01  
1 6 Vitiny Hemthon Camboya Cambodia (CAM) 30.44  
3 5 Alphonsine Crush Ruanda Rwanda (RWA) 30.72  
4 1 Nada Arkaji Catar Qatar (QAT) 30.89  
5 7 Fatoumata Samassekou Malí Mali (MLI) 31.88  
6 4 Angelika Ouedraogo Burkina Faso Burkina Faso (BUR) 32.19  
7 8 Aminath Shajan Maldivas Maldives (MDV) 32.23  
8 1 Yanet Seyoum Etiopía Ethiopia (ETH) 32.41  

Series 4

Rank Line Name nationality Weather Notes
1 1 Joyce Tafathata Malaui Malawi (MAW) 27.74  
1 5 Judith Meauri Papúa Nueva Guinea Papua New Guinea (PNG) 27.84  
3 4 Ann-Marie Hepler Islas Marshall Marshall Islands (MHL) 28.06  
4 3 Keesha Keane Palaos Palau (PLW) 28.25  
5 6 Sabine Hazboun Palestina Palestine (PLE) 28.28  
6 8 Antoinette Guedia Camerún Cameroon (CMR) 29.28  
7 7 Celeste Brown Islas Cook Cook Islands (COK) 29.36  
8 1 Mariana Henriques Angola Angola (ANG) 31.36  

Series 5

Rank Line Name nationality Weather Notes
1 4 Meilutyte route Lituania Lithuania (LTU) 25.55 NR
1 3 Gabriela Nikitina Letonia Latvia (LAT) 26.26  
3 5 Chinyere Pigot Surinam Suriname (SUR) 26.30  
4 6 Nicola Muscat Malta Malta (MLT) 27.22  
5 1 Jessica Teixeira Vieira Mozambique Mozambique (MOZ) 27.39  
6 7 Talita Baqlah Jordania Jordan (JOR) 27.45  
7 1 Faye Sultan Kuwait Kuwait (KUW) 27.92 NR
8 8 Jamila Lunkuse Uganda Uganda (UGA) 28.44  

Series 6

Rank Line Name nationality Weather Notes
1 3 Zhu Qianwei China China (CHN) 25.54  
1 5 Hanna-Maria Seppala Finlandia Finland (END) 25.55  
3 6 Erika Ferraioli Italia Italy (ITA) 25.69  
4 8 Alia Atkinson Jamaica Jamaica (JAM) 25.98  
5 1 Miroslava Syllabová Eslovaquia Slovakia (SVK) 26.07  
6 1 Farida Osman Egipto Egypt (EGY) 26.34  
7 7 Miroslava Najdanovski Serbia Serbia (SRB) 26.46  
- 4 Eszter Dara Hungría Hungary (HUN) - DNS

Series 7

Rank Line Name nationality Weather Notes
1 6 Sarah Blake Bateman Islandia Iceland (ISL) 25.28 QSO
1 1 Hayley palmer Nueva Zelanda New Zealand (NZL) 25.47  
3 4 Arlene Semeco Venezuela Venezuela (COM) 25.56  
4 7 Vanessa Garcia Puerto Rico Puerto Rico (PUR) 25.58  
5 3 Anna Dowgiert Polonia Poland (POL) 25.59  
6 8 Jolien Sysmans Bélgica Belgium (BEL) 25.60  
7 5 Burcu Dolunay Turquía Turkey (TUR) 25.72  
8 1 Trudi maree Sudáfrica South Africa (RSA) 25.78  

Series 8

Rank Line Name nationality Weather Notes
1 4 Therese Alshammar Suecia Sweden (SWE) 24.77 Q
1 3 Bronte Campbell Australia Australia (AUS) 24.87 Q
3 5 Cate Campbell Australia Australia (AUS) 24.94 Q
4 7 Theodora Drakou Grecia Greece (GRE) 25.13 Q
5 6 Kara Lynn Joyce Estados Unidos United States (USA) 25.28 QSO
6 1 Nery Niangkouara Grecia Greece (GRE) 25.40  
7 1 Graciele Herrmann Brasil Brazil (BRA) 25.44  
8 8 Yayoi Matsumoto Japón Japan (JPN) 25.73  

Series 9

Rank Line Name nationality Weather Notes
1 4 Francesca Halsall Reino Unido United Kingdom (GBR) 24.61 Q
1 5 Britta Steffen Alemania Germany (GER) 24.70 Q
3 3 Aliaksandra Herasimenia Bielorrusia Belarus (BLR) 24.76 Q
4 6 Sarah Sjöström Suecia Sweden (SWE) 24.94 Q
5 7 Victoria Poon Canadá Canada (CAN) 25.15 Q
6 8 Anna Santamans Francia France (FRA) 25.23 Q
7 1 Amy Smith Reino Unido United Kingdom (GBR) 25.28 QSO
8 1 PeNRille Blume Dinamarca Denmark (DEN) 25.54  

Series 10

Rank Line Name nationality Weather Notes
1 4 Ranomi Kromowidjojo Países Bajos Netherlands (NED) 24.51 Q
1 5 Marleen Veldhuis Países Bajos Netherlands (NED) 24.57 Q
3 1 Arianna Vanderpool-Wallace Bahamas Bahamas (BAH) 24.85 Q
= 6 Jeanette Ottesen Dinamarca Denmark (DEN) 24.85 Q
5 3 Jessica Hardy Estados Unidos United States (USA) 24.99 Q
6 7 Triin Aljand Estonia Estonia (EST) 25.33  
7 1 Sviatlana Khakhlova Bielorrusia Belarus (BLR) 25.36  
8 8 Darya Stepanyuk Ucrania Ukraine (UKR) 25.70  
 

Women's 100 metres Freestyle

 Host City: London, Great Britain
Venue(s): London Aquatics Centre, Olympic Park, Stratford, London
Date Started: August 1, 2012
Date Finished: August 2, 2012

Summary

After her 2008 Olympic title, [Britta Steffen] also won the 2009 world title. With the swimsuit craze at its zenith, she lowered the world record in Rome to a spectacular 52.07. With the new swimsuits banned from 2010, times dropped back into the 53-second range. At the 2011 World Championships, the title was shared between two outsiders, [Aleksandra Gerasimenya] and [Jeanette Ottesen]. Third then was [Ranomi Kromowidjojo], who would become the first to swim below 53 seconds in the post-polyurethane era, when she clocked 52.75 in spring 2012. At the 4x—100 m relay earlier in the Games, Kromowidjojo had by far clocked the fasted relay split, despite losing out to Australia's [Mel Schlanger] in the final leg. Other favorites for the gold medal included Sweden's [Sarah Sjostrom], 2012 European Champion and swimming 53.05 in late 2011, and home favorite [Fran Halsall]. Veteran swimmer [Therese Alshammar] suffered from a trapped nerve shortly before the Games, and decided to skip the event.

The semi-finals saw Steffen's Olympic Record fall, Kromowidjojo lowering it to 53.05. Steffen herself was eliminated, as was Sjostrom. Second best was Schlanger, three tenths back. In the final, it was Gerasimenya off to the best start, swimming from lane 1 (she had won the world title from lane 8). Kromowidjojo tuNRed in fourth place, but had the best second leg and powered to 53.00, again lowering the Olympic record. Second was Gerasimenya, winning Belarus' first Olympic medal in swimming, with [Tang Yi] claming a surprise bronze.

BoNR of a Surinamese father and a Dutch mother, Kromowidjojo won her first Olympic title at age 17 in Beijing with the Dutch relay team. The squad repeated at the 2009 and 2011 Worlds, but Kromowidjojo was yet to win an individual title in the 50 m pool. She did win two golds at the 2010 World Short Course Championships in Dubai. Earlier that year, she had been diagnosed with meningitis, causing her to miss the 2010 Europeans.

The women's 100 metre freestyle event at the 2012 Summer Olympics took place on 1–2 August at the London Aquatics Centre in London, United Kingdom.

Dutch swimmer Ranomi Kromowidjojo blasted a new Olympic record to become the country's third gold medalist in the event since Rie Mastenbroek topped the podium in 1936 and Inge de Bruijn in 2000. Flipping fourth at the halfway tuNR, she pulled ahead of a tightly-packed field to touch the wall first and improve her own record in 53.00. Belarus' Aliaksandra Herasimenia strengthened her lead on the first length under a world-record pace, but faded down the stretch to pick up a silver in 53.38. Meanwhile, China's Tang Yi produced a fast burst on the final lap to capture the bronze in 53.44.

Australia's Melanie Schlanger finished fourth in 53.47, while American teenage sensation Missy Franklin denied a chance for another Olympic medal with a fifth-place time in 53.64. Great Britain's home favorite Francesca Halsall (53.66), Denmark's Jeanette Ottesen (53.75), who shared the title with Herasimenia at the 2011 World Championships, and U.S. swimmer Jessica Hardy (54.02) rounded out the finale.

Before the breakthrough finale, Kromowidjojo threw down a top-seeded time of 53.05 to slice 0.07 seconds off the previous Olympic record set by Germany's defending champion Britta Steffen, who later missed the final roster with a twelfth-place finish (54.18) from the semifinals.

Among the fifty swimmers registered in the event, only forty-eight had competed. Sweden's five-time Olympian Therese Alshammar suffered from a pinched nerve in her neck, and decided to skip most of her events. Additionally, Australia's Cate Campbell scratched her first individual race because of a glandular fever.

Records

Prior to this competition, the existing world and Olympic records were as follows.

World record  Britta Steffen (GER) 52.07 Rome, Italy 31 July 2009
Olympic record  Britta Steffen (GER) 53.12 Beijing, China 15 August 2008

The following records were established during the competition:

Date Event Name Nationality Time Record
August 1 Semifinal 2 Ranomi Kromowidjojo  Netherlands 53.05 OR
August 2 Final Ranomi Kromowidjojo  Netherlands 53.00 OR
 

Final

Rank Lane Name Nationality Time Notes
1st place, gold medalist(s) 4 Ranomi Kromowidjojo  Netherlands 53.00 OR
2nd place, silver medalist(s) 1 Aliaksandra Herasimenia  Belarus 53.38 NR
3rd place, bronze medalist(s) 6 Tang Yi  China 53.44  
4 5 Melanie Schlanger  Australia 53.47  
5 3 Missy Franklin  United States 53.64  
6 7 Francesca Halsall  Great Britain 53.66  
7 2 Jeanette Ottesen  Denmark 53.75  
8 8 Jessica Hardy  United States 54.02  
 

Semifinals

Semifinal 1

Rank Lane Name Nationality Time Notes
1 4 Melanie Schlanger  Australia 53.38 Q
2 5 Aliaksandra Herasimenia  Belarus 53.78 Q
3 6 Jessica Hardy  United States 53.86 Q
4 2 Sarah Sjöström  Sweden 53.93  
5 3 Arianna Vanderpool-Wallace  Bahamas 54.12  
6 1 Britta Steffen  Germany 54.18  
7 8 Daniela Schreiber  Germany 54.39  
8 7 Haruka Ueda  Japan 54.59  
 

Semifinal 2

Rank Lane Name Nationality Time Notes
1 3 Ranomi Kromowidjojo  Netherlands 53.05 Q, OR
2 7 Missy Franklin  United States 53.59 Q
3 4 Tang Yi  China 53.60 Q
4 5 Jeanette Ottesen  Denmark 53.77 Q
6 Francesca Halsall  Great Britain Q
6 8 Femke Heemskerk  Netherlands 54.13  
7 2 Julia Wilkinson  Canada 54.25  
8 1 Amy Smith  Great Britain 54.28  
 

Series

Series 1

Rank Line Name nationality Weather Notes
1 4 Mareme Faye Senegal Senegal (SEN) 1: 06.42  
1 5 Shreya Dhital Nepal Nepal (NEP) 1: 10.80  
3 3 Ayouba Ali Sihame Comoras Comoros (COM) 1: 14.40  

Series 2

Rank Line Name nationality Weather Notes
1 3 Jade Howard Zambia Zambia (ZAM) 59.35  
1 5 Bayan Jumah Siria Syria (SYR) 59.78  
3 4 Karen Riveros Paraguay Paraguay (PAR) 59.86  
4 6 Britany van Lange Guyana Guyana (GUY) 1: 01.62  
5 1 Aina Fils Rabetsara Madagascar Madagascar (MAD) 1: 02.39  
6 7 Reshika Udugampola Sri Lanka Sri Lanka (SRI) 1: 04.93  
7 1 Cupcake moshi Tanzania Tanzania (TAN) 1: 05.80  

Series 3

Rank Line Name nationality Weather Notes
1 4 Eszter Dara Hungría Hungary (HUN) 55.37  
1 5 Liliana Ibanez México Mexico (MEX) 55.71 NR
3 3 Nastja Govejsek Eslovenia Slovenia (SLO) 56.21  
4 1 Mylene Ong Singapur Singapore (SIN) 56.33  
5 6 Jasmine Alkhaldi Filipinas Philippines (PHI) 57.13  
6 1 Megan Fonteno Samoa Americana American Samoa (ASA) 57.45  
7 7 Karen Torrez Bolivia Bolivia (BOL) 57.78 NR
8 8 Clelia Tini San Marino San Marino (SMR) 58.29  

Series 4

Rank Line Name nationality Weather Notes
1 4 Burcu Dolunay Turquía Turkey (TUR) 55.35  
1 1 Nina Rangelova Bulgaria Bulgaria (BUL) 55.52 NR
3 6 Daynara Paula Brasil Brazil (BRA) 55.94  
4 3 Katarzyna Wilk Polonia Poland (POL) 56.13  
5 7 Meilutyte route Lituania Lithuania (LTU) 56.33  
6 8 Katarina Filova Eslovaquia Slovakia (SVK) 56.58  
7 5 Arlene Semeco Venezuela Venezuela (COM) 56.90  
8 1 Miroslava Najdanovski Serbia Serbia (SRB) 57.45  

Series 5

Rank Line Name nationality Weather Notes
1 3 Tang yi China China (CHN) 53.28 Q
1 4 Jeanette Ottesen Dinamarca Denmark (DEN) 53.51 Q
3 6 Jessica Hardy Estados Unidos United States (USA) 54.09 Q
4 5 Femke Heemskerk Países Bajos Netherlands (NED) 54.43 Q
= 7 Daniela Schreiber Alemania Germany (GER) 54.43 Q
6 1 PeNRille Blume Dinamarca Denmark (DEN) 55.04  
7 1 Hannah Wilson Hong Kong Hong Kong (HKG) 55.33  
8 8 Nery Niangkouara Grecia Greece (GRE) 56.63  

Series 6

Rank Line Name nationality Weather Notes
1 7 Arianna Vanderpool-Wallace Bahamas Bahamas (BAH) 53.73 NR, Q
1 5 Francesca Halsall Reino Unido United Kingdom (GBR) 54.02 Q
3 1 Julia Wilkinson Canadá Canada (CAN) 54.16 Q
4 4 Sarah Sjöström Suecia Sweden (SWE) 54.26 Q
5 1 Amy Smith Reino Unido United Kingdom (GBR) 54.37 Q
6 3 Britta Steffen Alemania Germany (GER) 54.42 Q
7 8 Hanna-Maria Seppälä Finlandia Finland (END) 54.93  
- 6 Cate Campbell Australia Australia (AUS) - DNS

Series 7

Rank Line Name nationality Weather Notes
1 6 Melanie Schlanger Australia Australia (AUS) 53.50 Q
1 5 Aliaksandra Herasimenia Bielorrusia Belarus (BLR) 53.63 NR, Q
3 4 Ranomi Kromowidjojo Países Bajos Netherlands (NED) 53.66 Q
4 3 Missy franklin Estados Unidos United States (USA) 54.26 Q
5 1 Haruka Ueda Japón Japan (JPN) 54.35 Q
6 7 Veronika Popova Rusia Russia (RUS) 54.66  
7 8 Charlotte Bonnet Francia France (FRA) 55.12  
- 1 Therese Alshammar Suecia Sweden (SWE) - DNS
 

Women's 200 metres Freestyle

 Host City: London, Great Britain
Venue(s): London Aquatics Centre, Olympic Park, Stratford, London
Date Started: July 30, 2012
Date Finished: July 31, 2012

Summary

The defending gold medalist and World Champion was Italy's [Federica Pellegrini] but the favorite was American [Allison Schmitt], who had starred at the US Olympic Trials in June. They were expected to be challenged by Schmitt's teammate, [Missy Franklin], who was swimming an ambitious seven-event schedule in London. Franklin started the final fast, passing 50 metres under the world record split, but she could not hold that and Schmitt moved ahead by 100 metres. She continued to open up, winning the gold medal by almost two seconds over France's [Camille Muffat], bronze medalist in the 200 and 400 frees at the 2011 Worlds, and earlier the gold medalist in London in the 400 free. Australian [Bronte Barratt], better known for her efforts in relays, won the bronze medal, beating Franklin by only 1/100th of a second. Pellegrini was never a factor for the medals and placed fifth.

This was Schmitt's third medal of the London Olympics, after a silver in the 400 free behind Muffat and a bronze in the 4x—100 free relay. She had also won a bronze in 2008 as part of the 4x—200 relay. She would finish London 2012 with five medals and three golds, later adding gold medals in the medley relay and the 4x—200.

The women's 200 metre freestyle event at the 2012 Summer Olympics took place on 30–31 July at the London Aquatics Centre in London, United Kingdom.

U.S. swimmer Allison Schmitt blasted a new Olympic record with a stunning effort to capture the gold medal in the event for the first time, since Nicole Haislett topped the podium in 1992. She pulled away from a tightly-packed field on the final lap to hit the wall first in a sterling time of 1:53.61, shaving 1.21 seconds off the record set by Italy's Federica Pellegrini from Beijing in 2008. After defeating Schmitt in a close duel to grab the 400 m freestyle title two days earlier, France's Camille Muffat trailed behind her rival by almost a body length for the silver in 1:55.58. Meanwhile, Australia's Bronte Barratt produced a striking touch to take home the bronze in 1:55.81, edging out American teenage star Missy Franklin by a hundredth of a second.

Franklin missed a chance to add her third career medal with a fourth-place time in 1:55.82, while Pellegrini, the defending Olympic champion, dropped off the podium to fifth in 1:56.73. Russia's Veronika Popova (1:57.25), Great Britain's home favorite Caitlin McClatchey (1:57.60) and Barratt's teammate Kylie Palmer (1:57.68) closed out the field.

Notable swimmers failed to reach the top-eight final roster including Slovenia's Sara Isaković, the defending silver medalist, who placed fourteenth (1:58.47) in the semifinals; and Romania's Camelia Potec, a four-time Olympian and 2004 Olympic champion, who posted a twenty-fifth place time (2:01.15) on the moNRing prelims.

Records

Prior to this competition, the existing world and Olympic records were as follows.

World record  Federica Pellegrini (ITA) 1:52.98 Rome, Italy 29 July 2009
Olympic record  Federica Pellegrini (ITA) 1:54.82 Beijing, China 13 August 2008

The following records were established during the competition:

Date Event Name Nationality Time Record
July 31 Final Allison Schmitt  United States 1:53.61 OR
 

Final

Rank Lane Name Nationality Time Notes
1st place, gold medalist(s) 5 Allison Schmitt  United States 1:53.61 OR, AM
2nd place, silver medalist(s) 3 Camille Muffat  France 1:55.58  
3rd place, bronze medalist(s) 4 Bronte Barratt  Australia 1:55.81  
4 8 Missy Franklin  United States 1:55.82  
5 6 Federica Pellegrini  Italy 1:56.73  
6 2 Veronika Popova  Russia 1:57.25  
7 7 Caitlin McClatchey  Great Britain 1:57.60  
8 1 Kylie Palmer  Australia 1:57.68  

Semifinals

Semifinal 1

Rank Lane Name Nationality Time Notes
1 2 Bronte Barratt  Australia 1:56.08 Q
2 4 Allison Schmitt  United States 1:56.15 Q
3 7 Camille Muffat  France 1:56.18 Q
4 5 Veronika Popova  Russia 1:56.84 Q, NR
5 3 Barbara Jardin  Canada 1:57.91  
6 6 Sarah Sjöström  Sweden 1:58.12  
7 8 Sara Isaković  Slovenia 1:58.47  
8 1 Wang Shijia  China 1:58.63  

Semifinal 2

Rank Lane Name Nationality Time Notes
1 4 Federica Pellegrini  Italy 1:56.67 Q
2 6 Caitlin McClatchey  Great Britain 1:57.33 Q
3 7 Kylie Palmer  Australia 1:57.44 Q
4 5 Missy Franklin  United States 1:57.57 Q
5 3 Melania Costa Schmid  Spain 1:57.76  
6 2 Samantha Cheverton  Canada 1:57.98  
7 1 Silke Lippok  Germany 1:58.24  
8 8 Hanae Ito  Japan 1:59.62  

Series

Series 1

Rank Line Name nationality Weather Notes
1 3 Natthanan Junkrajang Tailandia Thailand (THA) 2: 02.49  
1 5 Danielle Villars Suiza Switzerland (SUI) 2: 03.55  
3 4 Baek Il-Joo Corea del Sur South Korea (KOR) 2: 04.32  
4 6 Heather Arseth Mauricio Mauritius (MRI) 2: 07.81  
5 1 Aurelie Fanchette Seychelles Seychelles (SEY) 2: 23.49  

Series 2

Rank Line Name nationality Weather Notes
1 5 PeNRille Blume Dinamarca Denmark (DEN) 2: 00.91  
1 6 Camelia Potec Rumania Romania (ROU) 2: 01.15  
3 1 Liliana Ibanez México Mexico (MEX) 2: 01.36  
4 1 Anna Stylianou Chipre Cyprus (CYP) 2: 01.87  
5 8 Katarína Filová Eslovaquia Slovakia (SVK) 2: 02.03  
6 4 Jördis Steinegger Austria Austria (AUT) 2: 02.39  
7 7 Hanna-Maria Seppälä Finlandia Finland (END) 2: 04.21  
- 3 Grainne Murphy Irlanda Ireland (IRL) - DNS

Series 3

Rank Line Name nationality Weather Notes
1 5 Federica Pellegrini Italia Italy (ITA) 1: 57.16 Q
1 4 Missy franklin Estados Unidos United States (USA) 1: 57.62 Q
3 3 Veronika Popova Rusia Russia (RUS) 1: 57.79 Q
4 6 Barbara Jardin Canadá Canada (CAN) 1: 57.92 Q
5 7 Samantha Cheverton Canadá Canada (CAN) 1: 58.11 Q
6 1 Rebecca TuNRer Reino Unido United Kingdom (GBR) 1: 58.98  
7 1 Ophelie-Cyrielle Etienne Francia France (FRA) 1: 59.15  
8 8 Sze Hang Yu Hong Kong Hong Kong (HKG) 1: 59.92  

Series 4

Rank Line Name nationality Weather Notes
1 1 Caitlin McClatchey Reino Unido United Kingdom (GBR) 1: 58.03 Q
1 3 Bronte Barratt Australia Australia (AUS) 1: 58.12 Q
3 4 Camille Muffat Francia France (FRA) 1: 58.49 Q
4 6 Wang shijia China China (CHN) 1: 58.73 Q
5 1 Hanae Ito Japón Japan (JPN) 1: 58.93 Q
6 8 Nina Rangelova Bulgaria Bulgaria (BUL) 1: 59.21 NR
7 7 Song Wenyan China China (CHN) 1: 59.47  
- 5 Femke Heemskerk Países Bajos Netherlands (NED) - DNS

Series 5

Rank Line Name nationality Weather Notes
1 4 Allison Schmitt Estados Unidos United States (USA) 1: 57.33 Q
1 7 Melani Costa Schmid España Spain (ESP) 1: 57.79 Q
3 5 Sarah Sjöström Suecia Sweden (SWE) 1: 58.03 Q
4 3 Kylie palmer Australia Australia (AUS) 1: 58.16 Q
5 6 Silke Lippok Alemania Germany (GER) 1: 58.59 Q
6 1 Sara Isaković Eslovenia Slovenia (SLO) 1: 58.96 Q
7 8 Karin Prinsloo Sudáfrica South Africa (RSA) 1: 59.24  
8 1 Ágnes Mutina Hungría Hungary (HUN) 1: 59.56  
 
 

Women's 400 metres Freestyle

 Host City: London, Great Britain
Venue(s): London Aquatics Centre, Olympic Park, Stratford, London
Date Started: July 29, 2012
Date Finished: July 29, 2012

Summary

All of Britain put their hopes on the defending gold medalist, [Becky Adlington], but realists looked towards Italy's [Federica Pellegrini], the 2011 World Champion in both the 200 and 400 free, or France's [Camille Muffat], bronze medalist at the 2011 Worlds. As the final started Muffat took the early lead accompanied by American [Allison Schmitt], with Pellegrini in third and Adlington well back early. Muffat and Schmitt were the class of the field and were never really separated, with Muffat winning the gold medal just ahead of the American, 4:01.45 to 4:01.77. Adlington finished the strongest of any swimmer but she had left herself too large a gap to make up and could only come back for the bronze medal. Pellegrini was never in the medal race and placed fifth. A few days later, Muffat and Schmitt would go at it again in the 200, with Schmitt winning that one.

 Adlington claims another  400m Freestyle medal


The extent by which this sport moves on was never better illustrated than in this final, when Britain’s Rebecca Adlington took the bronze medal despite swimming faster than she had to win gold at Beijing 2008. Trailing in sixth place at the halfway point, as Camille Muffat of France (4:01.45) and Allison Schmitt of the USA (4:01.77) set the early pace to secure the gold and silver medals, the defending champion left her surge until the final 50m. With the home crowd urging her on, she made enough headway to grab her spot on the podium in 4:03.01. But this was about differences of expectation, as Adlington explained afterwards. ‘Gold wasn’t my expectation, it was the people’s expectation,’ she said. ‘Everyone has been saying to me “hey, are you going to get a gold?” like I’m just going to pick up a drink, like it’s so easy.’

The women's 400 metre freestyle event at the 2012 Summer Olympics took place on 29 July at the London Aquatics Centre in London, United Kingdom.

France's Camille Muffat held off a sprint duel from a hard-charging American Allison Schmitt with every stroke on the final stretch to capture the event's second Olympic title for her nation, since Laure Manaudou topped the podium in 2004. She maintained her powerful lead from the start to edge out Schmitt by 0.32 seconds for the gold medal and a new Olympic record in 4:01.45. Meanwhile, Schmitt could not catch Muffat on a head-to-head duel to finish with an American record of 4:01.77 in the process of a silver. Great Britain's Rebecca Adlington struggled through the race for her Olympic title defense, but brought out a raucous cheer from a home crowd to eaNR the bronze in 4:03.01.

Denmark's Lotte Friis finished off the podium with a fourth-place time and a national record in 4:03.98, while Italy's Federica Pellegrini, the reigning world record holder, faded to fifth in 4:04.50.[8] Muffat's teammate Coralie Balmy (4:05.95), Canada's Brittany MacLean (4:06.24) and New Zealand's Lauren Boyle (4:06.25) rounded out the field.

Records

Prior to this competition, the existing world and Olympic records were as follows.

World record  Federica Pellegrini (ITA) 3:59.15 Rome, Italy 26 July 2009
Olympic record  Federica Pellegrini (ITA) 4:02.19 Beijing, China 10 August 2008

The following records were established during the competition:

Date Event Name Nationality Time Record
July 29 Final Camille Muffat  France 4:01.45 OR
 

Final

Rank Lane Name Nationality Time Notes
1st place, gold medalist(s) 4 Camille Muffat  France 4:01.45 OR
2nd place, silver medalist(s) 5 Allison Schmitt  United States 4:01.77 AM
3rd place, bronze medalist(s) 8 Rebecca Adlington  Great Britain 4:03.01  
4 2 Lotte Friis  Denmark 4:03.98 NR
5 1 Federica Pellegrini  Italy 4:04.50  
6 3 Coralie Balmy  France 4:05.95  
7 7 Brittany MacLean  Canada 4:06.24  
8 6 Lauren Boyle  New Zealand 4:06.25  
 

Series

Series 1

Rank Line Name nationality Weather Notes
1 4 Mojca Sagmeister Eslovenia Slovenia (SLO) 4: 21.55  
1 5 Andrea Cedrón Perú Peru (PER) 4: 24.18  
3 3 Jennet Saryyeva Turkmenistán Turkmenistan (TKM) 5: 40.29 NR

Series 2

Rank Line Name nationality Weather Notes
1 3 Nina Rangelova Bulgaria Bulgaria (BUL) 4: 11.71 NR
1 5 Kristel Köbrich Chile Chile (CHI) 4: 12.02  
3 4 Aya Takano Japón Japan (JPN) 4: 12.33  
4 1 Julia Hassler Liechtenstein Liechtenstein (LIE) 4: 12.99 NR
5 6 Susana Escobar México Mexico (MEX) 4: 14.78  
6 8 Natthanan Junkrajang Tailandia Thailand (THA) 4: 16.45  
7 1 Lynette Lim Singapur Singapore (SIN) 4: 18.64  
8 7 Kim Ga-Eul Corea del Sur South Korea (KOR) 4: 43.46  

Series 3

Rank Line Name nationality Weather Notes
1 4 Rebecca Adlington Reino Unido United Kingdom (GBR) 4: 05.75 Q
1 5 Chloe sutton Estados Unidos United States (USA) 4: 07.07  
3 6 Mireia Belmonte Garcia España Spain (ESP) 4: 08.23  
4 7 Éva Risztov Hungría Hungary (HUN) 4: 09.08  
5 3 Li Xuanxu China China (CHN) 4: 10.95  
6 1 Camelia Potec Rumania Romania (ROU) 4: 11.43  
7 1 Joanne Jackson Reino Unido United Kingdom (GBR) 4: 11.50  
8 8 Wendy Trott Sudáfrica South Africa (RSA) 4: 11.63  

Series 4

Rank Line Name nationality Weather Notes
1 6 Coralie Balmy Francia France (FRA) 4: 03.56 Q
1 1 Brittany MacLean Canadá Canada (CAN) 4: 05.06 NR, Q
3 4 Federica Pellegrini Italia Italy (ITA) 4: 05.30 Q
4 5 Kylie palmer Australia Australia (AUS) 4: 07.27  
5 3 Shao Yiwen China China (CHN) 4: 08.41  
6 1 Andreina Pinto Venezuela Venezuela (COM) 4: 08.45 NR
7 7 Savannah king Canadá Canada (CAN) 4: 10.93  
8 8 Grainne Murphy Irlanda Ireland (IRL) 4: 19.07  

Series 5

Rank Line Name nationality Weather Notes
1 4 Camille Muffat Francia France (FRA) 4: 03.29 Q
1 5 Allison Schmitt Estados Unidos United States (USA) 4: 03.31 Q
3 1 Lauren Boyle Nueva Zelanda New Zealand (NZL) 4: 03.63 Q, NR
4 6 Lotte Friis Dinamarca Denmark (DEN) 4: 04.22 Q, NR
5 7 Melani Costa Schmid España Spain (ESP) 4: 06.75  
6 3 Bronte Barratt Australia Australia (AUS) 4: 07.99  
7 1 Boglárka Kapás Hungría Hungary (HUN) 4: 10.01  
8 8 Elena Sokolova Rusia Russia (RUS) 4: 12.19  
 
 

Women's 800 metres Freestyle

 Host City: London, Great Britain
Venue(s): London Aquatics Centre, Olympic Park, Stratford, London
Date Started: August 2, 2012
Date Finished: August 3, 2012

Summary

Britain's [Becky Adlington] was the defending champion and the 2011 World Champion, and the entire British crowd was there to root her home again. Her biggest challenger was expected to be Denmark's [Lotte Friis], runner-up at the 2011 Worlds in this event and World Champion in the non-Olympic 1,500. But at the US Olympic Trials in June a young American, 15-year-old [Katie Ledecky] had served notice she should be watched. And the other swimmers did watch her, from behind for the entire final. Ledecky went out ahead of world record pace for 200 metres, with Adlington and Friis trying to hang on. By 600 metres she had moved two bodylengths in front and had only to hold on for the gold medal. Ledecky won in 8:14.63, the second fastest time ever, just off Adlington's world record of 8:14.10 from the Beijing Olympics, but Ledecky's was done in a textile suit. Adlington suffered in the final laps and dropped back to bronze, with the silver taken by Spain's [Mireia Belmonte]. Friis also faded near the end and placed fifth.

Ledecky became the youngest ever champion in this event at 15 years, 139 days, bettering the previous youngest, who was 1976 East German champion [Petra Thumer], then 15-177. It also made her the seventh youngest individual swimming gold medalist in any Olympic event, and sixth youngest woman.

 Rebecca bows to talented teenager in the 800m Freestyle
Britain’s Rebecca Adlington did her best to make the most of her bronze medal at the end of an exhausting week’s work, but there was no denying that a 15-year-old American had proved this was very much a young person’s game. Swimming in her first championship for her country, Katie Ledecky swept to victory in 8:14.63, a USA record as Adlington, aged 23, saw the second of her two Olympic titles taken away – though not her world 800m record. It was one of the best performances seen at the Olympic Games and one that neither Adlington (8:20.32) nor the silver medallist, Mireia Belmonte Garcia (ESP), could live with. The Washington schoolgirl took an early lead and, with the first three swimming at sub-world record pace, Adlington expected the main challenge to come from Denmark’s Lotte Friis, the bronze medallist behind her at Beijing 2008. But Ledecky did not slow, and she simply pulled away. With 200m still to go, she had established an unassailable lead and joined the legend of USA
swimming, Janet Evans, in winning the longest of the events in the pool. She was also the latest teenager to cause a sensation at London 2012, following the gold medal exploits of China’s Shiwen Ye and Lithuania’s Ruta Meilutyte. With 100m to go, Mireia Belmonte Garcia moved ahead of Adlington to make the touch in 8:18.76 for her second silver medal of the Games after finishing second in the 200m Butterfly. Through the tears, Adlington acknowledged the passing of the baton. ‘That was painful,’ she said. ‘Katie is absolutely incredible.’ There were also mutterings about retirement, but much about Adlington’s future will only be decided once the dust has settled. As for Ledecky, she accepted that the new breed of swimmers had taken over. ‘I think it is really neat. There must be a new generation coming up now that some of the older swimmers are retiring.’

The women's 800 metre freestyle event at the 2012 Summer Olympics took place on 2–3 August at the London Aquatics Centre.

Aged only 15, American Katie Ledecky narrowly missed the world record on the final lap to recapture the Olympic title for the Americans since Brooke Bennett topped the podium in 2000. Strengthening her lead almost the entire race, she headed into the 750-metre tuNR under world-record pace, and pulled off a stunning upset from the rest of the field to post a personal best and smash Janet Evans' 23-year-old U.S. record in 8:14.63. Spain's Mireia Belmonte García added a second silver to her Olympic hardware in a national record of 8:18.76. Meanwhile, Great Britain's Rebecca Adlington, the reigning Olympic champion, tried to hold on with Ledecky earlier through the race, but faded down the stretch to pick up a bronze in 8:20.32.

New Zealand's Lauren Boyle produced a spectacular swim to finish with a fourth-place time and an Oceanian record in 8:22.72. Meanwhile, Denmark's Lotte Friis, the defending bronze medalist, opened up the race with an early lead, but dropped back to fifth in 8:23.86 to hold off a fast-charging Hungarian Boglárka Kapás (8:23.89) on the final lap by almost a fingertip.[8] France's Coralie Balmy (8:29.26) and Venezuela's Andreina Pinto (8:29.28) rounded out the field in one of the program's long-distance pool races.

Records

Prior to this competition, the existing world and Olympic records were as follows.

World record  Rebecca Adlington (GBR) 8:14.10 Beijing, China 16 August 2008
Olympic record  Rebecca Adlington (GBR) 8:14.10 Beijing, China 16 August 2008
 

Final

Rank Lane Name Nationality Time Notes
1st place, gold medalist(s) 3 Katie Ledecky  United States 8:14.63 AM
2nd place, silver medalist(s) 6 Mireia Belmonte García  Spain 8:18.76 NR
3rd place, bronze medalist(s) 4 Rebecca Adlington  Great Britain 8:20.32  
4 2 Lauren Boyle  New Zealand 8:22.72 OC
5 5 Lotte Friis  Denmark 8:23.86  
6 7 Boglárka Kapás  Hungary 8:23.89 NR
7 8 Coralie Balmy  France 8:29.26  
8 1 Andreina Pinto  Venezuela 8:29.28  

Series

Series 1

Rank Line Name nationality Weather Notes
1 4 Samantha Arevalo Ecuador Ecuador (ECU) 8: 49.21 NR
1 5 Pamela Benitez El Salvador El Salvador (ESA) 9: 02.66  
3 6 Danielle van den Berg Aruba Aruba (ARU) 9: 23.21  
4 3 Simona Marinova Macedonia Macedonia (MKD) 9: 28.41  

Series 2

Rank Line Name nationality Weather Notes
1 4 Julia Hassler Liechtenstein Liechtenstein (LIE) 8: 35.18 NR
1 1 Katya Bachrouche Líbano Lebanon (LIB) 8:35:88  
3 5 Tjasa oder Eslovenia Slovenia (SLO) 8: 41.82  
4 6 Patricia Castaneda México Mexico (MEX) 8: 44.44  
5 3 Nina Dittrich Austria Austria (AUT) 8: 45.41  
6 7 Cai Lin Khoo Malasia Malaysia (MAS) 8: 51.18  
7 1 Lynette Lim Singapur Singapore (SIN) 8: 52.92  
8 8 Han Na-Kyeong Corea del Sur South Korea (KOR) 8: 57.26  

Series 3

Rank Line Name nationality Weather Notes
1 4 Katie Ledecky Estados Unidos United States (USA) 8: 23.84 Q
1 5 Mireia Belmonte García España Spain (ESP) 8: 25.26 Q
3 1 Alexa KomaNRycky Canadá Canada (CAN) 8: 28.11  
4 3 Wendy Trott Sudáfrica South Africa (RSA) 8: 28.98  
5 1 Éva Risztov Hungría Hungary (HUN) 8: 29.06  
6 6 Ellie Faulkner Reino Unido United Kingdom (GBR) 8: 38.00  
7 8 Elena Sokolova Rusia Russia (RUS) 8: 42.73  
- 7 Grainne Murphy Irlanda Ireland (IRL) - DNS

Series 4

Rank Line Name nationality Weather Notes
1 4 Lotte Friis Dinamarca Denmark (DEN) 8: 21.89 Q
1 3 Boglárka Kapás Hungría Hungary (HUN) 8: 26.43 Q
= 8 Andreína Pinto Venezuela Venezuela (COM) 8: 26.43 NR, Q
4 1 Coralie Balmy Francia France (FRA) 8: 27.15 Q
5 7 Kristel Köbrich Chile Chile (CHI) 8: 29.55  
6 6 Kylie palmer Australia Australia (AUS) 8: 35.75  
7 1 Camelia Potec Rumania Romania (ROU) 8: 38.44  
8 5 Xin Xin China China (CHN) 8: 40.88  

Series 5

Rank Line Name nationality Weather Notes
1 4 Rebecca Adlington Reino Unido United Kingdom (GBR) 8: 21.78 Q
1 6 Lauren Boyle Nueva Zelanda New Zealand (NZL) 8: 25.91 NR, Q
3 3 Shao Yiwen China China (CHN) 8: 27.78  
4 1 Erika Villaecija Garcia España Spain (ESP) 8: 27.99  
5 1 Savannah king Canadá Canada (CAN) 8: 29.72  
6 8 Cecilia Biagioli Argentina Argentina (ARG) 8: 33.97 NR
7 7 Jessica Ashwood Australia Australia (AUS) 8: 37.21  
8 5 Kate Ziegler Estados Unidos United States (USA) 8: 37.38  
 
 

Women's 4 x— 100 metres Freestyle Relay

 Host City: London, Great Britain
Venue(s): London Aquatics Centre, Olympic Park, Stratford, London
Date Started: July 28, 2012
Date Finished: July 28, 2012

Summary

This event was considered wide open with the medals expected to be contested among Australia, the defending gold medalists, the Netherlands, and the United States. The USA led the final early, with opening legs by [Missy Franklin] (53.52) and [Jessica Hardy] (53.53). On the third leg Australian [Brittany Elmslie] put her team in the lead, and Melanie Schlanger extended the lead with a 52.65 final 100 to bring home the gold medal. The USA was not able to hold onto silver, as the Netherlands, which had been last after the first leg, came home strongly on the back of [Ranomi Kromowidjojo], who had the fastest split of the event with a finishing 51.93 which brought the Dutch team a silver medal.

For the United States, [Natalie Coughlin] had swum in the prelims which eaNRed her a bronze medal. It was the 12th Olympic medal of her vaunted career, tying the Olympic female record for swimmers held by [Dara Torres] and [Jenny Thompson].

The women's 4 × 100 metre freestyle relay event at the 2012 Summer Olympics took place on 28 July at the London Aquatics Centre in London, United Kingdom.

The Australian women's team fought off an early lead by their American rivals and overhauled the field down the stretch to recapture the Olympic freestyle relay title they last held in 2004. The foursome of Alicia Coutts (53.90), Cate Campbell (53.19), Brittany Elmslie (53.41), and Melanie Schlanger (52.65) put together a blazing fast finish with a new Olympic record in 3:33.15.

The Netherlands nearly pulled a worst-to-first effort, building from an eighth-place tuNR by Inge Dekker (54.67), fifth by Marleen Veldhuis (53.80), and third by Femke Heemskerk (53.39), until they handed Ranomi Kromowidjojo the anchor duties on the final exchange. She delivered a fastest freestyle split in the field with an anchor of 51.93 to race against the Americans for the silver in 3:33.79, but finished just 0.64 seconds off the pace posted by the Australians. Meanwhile, the U.S. team got off an early lead from Missy Franklin (53.52) and Jessica Hardy (53.53), but slipped through the final stretches from Lia Neal (53.65) and Allison Schmitt (53.54) to settle for the bronze in an American record of 3:34.24. Building a new milestone, Neal became the first ever African-American female to swim in an Olympic final, while Natalie Coughlin, who competed earlier in the relay prelims, picked up her twelfth career medal to share a three-way tie with Dara Torres and Jenny Thompson as the most decorated female Olympic swimmers of all time.

China (3:36.75), Great Britain (3:37.02), Denmark (3:37.45), and Japan (3:37.96) also vied for an Olympic medal to round out the championship finale, while Sweden was disqualified from the race because of an early relay takeoff by anchor Gabriella Fagundez.

Records

Prior to this competition, the existing world and Olympic records were as follows.

World record  Netherlands (NED)
Inge Dekker (53.61)
Ranomi Kromowidjojo (52.30)
Femke Heemskerk (53.03)
Marleen Veldhuis (52.78)
3:31.72 Rome, Italy 26 July 2009
Olympic record  Netherlands (NED)
Inge Dekker (54.37)
Ranomi Kromowidjojo (53.39)
Femke Heemskerk (53.42)
Marleen Veldhuis (52.58)
3:33.76 Beijing, China 10 August 2008

The following records were established during the competition:

Date Event Name Nation Time Record
July 28 Final Alicia Coutts (53.90)
Cate Campbell (53.19)
Brittany Elmslie (53.41)
Melanie Schlanger (52.65)
 Australia 3:33.15 OR

Final

Rank Lane Nation Swimmers Time Time Behind Notes
1st place, gold medalist(s) 4  Australia Alicia Coutts (53.90)
Cate Campbell (53.19)
Brittany Elmslie (53.41)
Melanie Schlanger (52.65)
3:33.15   OR
2nd place, silver medalist(s) 3  Netherlands Inge Dekker (54.67)
Marleen Veldhuis (53.80)
Femke Heemskerk (53.39)
Ranomi Kromowidjojo (51.93)
3:33.79 0.64  
3rd place, bronze medalist(s) 5  United States Missy Franklin (53.52)
Jessica Hardy (53.53)
Lia Neal (53.65)
Allison Schmitt (53.54)
3:34.24 1.09 AM, NR
4 6  China Tang Yi (53.58)
Qiu Yuhan (54.49)
Wang Haibing (54.03)
Pang Jiaying (54.65)
3:36.75 3.60  
5 8  Great Britain Amy Smith (54.27)
Francesca Halsall (53.29)
Jess Lloyd (54.65)
Caitlin McClatchey (54.81)
3:37.02 3.87  
6 7  Denmark PeNRille Blume (54.52)
Mie Nielsen (54.04)
Lotte Friis (55.65)
Jeanette Ottesen Gray (53.24)
3:37.45 4.30 NR
7 2  Japan Haruka Ueda (54.34)
Yayoi Matsumoto (54.52)
Miki Uchida (54.43)
Hanae Ito (54.67)
3:37.96 4.81 NR
  1  Sweden Michelle Coleman (54.57)
Sarah Sjöström (53.91)
Ida Marko-Varga (55.01)
Gabriella Fagundez
DSQ  

Heat 1

Rank Heat Lane Nation Swimmers Time Notes
2 1 4  United States Lia Neal (54.15)
Amanda Weir (54.37)
Natalie Coughlin (53.93)
Allison Schmitt (54.08)
3:36.53 Q
4 1 6  China Tang Yi (53.86)
Qiu Yuhan (54.85)
Wang Haibing (54.14)
Wang Shijia (55.06)
3:37.91 Q
5 1 5  Japan Haruka Ueda (54.22)
Yayoi Matsumoto (54.23)
Miki Uchida (54.47)
Hanae Ito (55.14)
3:38.06 Q, NR
7 1 2  Great Britain Amy Smith (54.29)
Jess Lloyd (54.53)
Caitlin McClatchey (54.64)
Rebecca TuNRer (54.75)
3:38.21 Q
7 1 3  Sweden Sarah Sjöström (54.31)
Michelle Coleman (54.14)
Ida Marko-Varga (54.57)
Gabriella Fagundez (55.19)
3:38.21 Q
10 1 7  Russia Veronika Popova (54.30)
Nataliya Lovtsova (55.00)
Viktoriya Andreyeva (55.27)
Margarita Nesterova (55.02)
3:39.59  
13 1 8  Belarus Aliaksandra Herasimenia (53.85)
Sviatlana Khakhlova (54.96)
Aksana Dziamidava (55.94)
Yuliya Khitraya (55.92)
3:40.67 NR
15 1 1  Hungary Ágnes Mutina (56.05)
Evelyn Verrasztó (55.80)
Éva Risztov (57.81)
Eszter Dara (55.13)
3:44.79  

Heat 2

Rank Heat Lane Nation Swimmers Time Notes
1 2 3  Australia Emily Seebohm (54.24)
Brittany Elmslie (53.41)
Yolane Kukla (54.61)
Lisbeth Trickett (54.08)
3:36.34 Q
3 2 4  Netherlands Marleen Veldhuis (54.73)
Inge Dekker (53.79)
Hinkelien Schreuder (55.62)
Femke Heemskerk (53.59)
3:37.76 Q
6 2 2  Denmark PeNRille Blume (54.44)
Mie Nielsen (54.49)
Lotte Friis (55.97)
Jeanette Ottesen Gray (53.19)
3:38.09 Q, NR
9 2 5  Germany Britta Steffen (54.43)
Silke Lippok (55.30)
Lisa Vitting (54.77)
Daniela Schreiber (54.66)
3:39.16  
11 2 6  Canada Victoria Poon (54.67)
Julia Wilkinson (54.38)
Samantha Cheverton (54.93)
Heather Maclean (55.62)
3:39.60  
12 2 7  Italy Alice Mizzau (55.17)
Federica Pellegrini (54.28)
Laura Letrari (55.74)
Erika Ferraioli (54.55)
3:39.74 NR
14 2 1  New Zealand Natasha Hind (55.93)
Penelope Marshall (55.82)
Amaka Gessler (55.77)
Hayley Palmer (55.03)
3:42.55  
16 2 8  Greece Theodora Drakou (55.42)
Nery Mantey Niangkouara (55.52)
Theodora Giareni (57.26)
Kristel VouNRa (57.35)
3:45.55  
 

Women's 4 x— 200 metres Freestyle Relay

 Host City: London, Great Britain
Venue(s): London Aquatics Centre, Olympic Park, Stratford, London
Date Started: August 1, 2012
Date Finished: August 1, 2012

Summary

The United States had won this event three of the four times it had been contested at the Olympics, but the 2008 champions were Australia. Australia had already beaten the US in London in the 4x—100 relay and they led for most of the final, challenged mostly by France, but [Allison Schmitt] was the US anchor and came home in the fastest split of the event, 1:54.09, to bring the United States their fourth gold medal in the event. Australia held on for the silver medal and France won bronze, Canada just missing out in fourth place.

The women's 4 × 200 metre freestyle relay event at the 2012 Summer Olympics took place on 1 August at the London Aquatics Centre in London, United Kingdom.

The U.S. women's team smashed a new Olympic record to recapture their freestyle relay title with the help of a sterling anchor leg from Allison Schmitt. Trailing throughout most of the race with a back-to-back lead from Australia and France before the final exchange, Schmitt demolished the field with a remarkable split of 1:54.09 to deliver the American foursome of Missy Franklin (1:55.96), Dana Vollmer (1:56.02), and Shannon Vreeland (1:56.85) a gold medal and an Olympic record in 7:42.92.

Australia's Bronte Barratt (1:55.76), Melanie Schlanger (1:55.62), and Kylie Palmer (1:56.91) handed Alicia Coutts the anchor duties at the final exchange with a 0.54-second lead, but Coutts' split of 1:56.12 was just over a full-body length behind Schmitt's stunning anchor, leaving them with a silver medal in 7:44.41. Meanwhile, the fantastic French quartet of Camille Muffat (1:55.51), Charlotte Bonnet (1:57.78), Ophélie-Cyrielle Étienne (1:58.05), and Coralie Balmy (1:56.15) took home the bronze in 7:47.49.

Canada's Barbara Jardin (1:57.96), Samantha Cheverton (1:56.91), Amanda Reason (1:59.32), and Brittany MacLean (1:56.46) missed the podium with a fourth-place time in 7:50.65, while Great Britain's home favorite foursome of Caitlin McClatchey (1:58.66), Rebecca TuNRer (1:57.39), Hannah Miley (1:58.12), and Joanne Jackson (1:58.20) struggled to mount a challenge in an Olympic-medal race as they finished fifth in 7:52.37.[8][9] China (7:53.11), led by medley double champion Ye Shiwen, Italy (7:56.30), and Japan (7:56.73) rounded out the championship finale.

Records

Prior to this competition, the existing world and Olympic records were as follows.

World record  China (CHN)
Yang Yu (1:55.47)
Zhu Qianwei (1:55.79)
Liu Jing (1:56.09)
Pang Jiaying (1:54.73)
7:42.08 Rome, Italy 30 July 2009
Olympic record  Australia (AUS)
Stephanie Rice (1:56.60)
Bronte Barratt (1:56.58)
Kylie Palmer (1:55.22)
Linda Mackenzie (1:55.91)
7:44.31 Beijing, China 14 August 2008

The following records were established during the competition:

Date Event Name Nation Time Record
August 1 Final Missy Franklin (1:55.96)
Dana Vollmer (1:56.02)
Shannon Vreeland (1:56.85)
Allison Schmitt (1:54.09)
 United States 7:42.92 OR
 

Final

Rank Lane Nation Swimmers Time Time Behind Notes
1st place, gold medalist(s) 5  United States Missy Franklin (1:55.96)
Dana Vollmer (1:56.02)
Shannon Vreeland (1:56.85)
Allison Schmitt (1:54.09)
7:42.92   OR
2nd place, silver medalist(s) 4  Australia Bronte Barratt (1:55.76)
Melanie Schlanger (1:55.62)
Kylie Palmer (1:56.91)
Alicia Coutts (1:56.12)
7:44.41 1.49  
3rd place, bronze medalist(s) 2  France Camille Muffat (1:55.51)
Charlotte Bonnet (1:57.78)
Ophélie-Cyrielle Étienne (1:58.05)
Coralie Balmy (1:56.15)
7:47.49 4.57 NR
4 3  Canada Barbara Jardin (1:57.96)
Samantha Cheverton (1:56.91)
Amanda Reason (1:59.32)
Brittany MacLean (1:56.46)
7:50.65 7.73  
5 1  Great Britain Caitlin McClatchey (1:58.66)
Rebecca TuNRer (1:57.39)
Hannah Miley (1:58.12)
Joanne Jackson (1:58.20)
7:52.37 9.45  
6 7  China Wang Shijia (1:58.32)
Ye Shiwen (1:57.37)
Liu Jing (1:59.51)
Tang Yi (1:57.91)
7:53.11 10.19  
7 6  Italy Alice Mizzau (1:58.93)
Alice Nesti (2:00.03)
Diletta Carli (1:59.73)
Federica Pellegrini (1:57.61)
7:56.30 13.38  
8 8  Japan Haruka Ueda (1:58.23)
Hanae Ito (1:58.26)
Yayoi Matsumoto (2:00.82)
Aya Takano (1:59.42)
7:56.73 13.81  

Heat 1

Rank Heat Lane Nation Swimmers Time Notes
1 1 4  Australia Brittany Elmslie (1:57.50)
Angie Bainbridge (1:57.70)
Jade Neilsen (1:57.25)
Blair Evans (1:56.99)
7:49.44 Q
3 1 5  Canada Barbara Jardin (1:57.76)
Samantha Cheverton (1:57.38)
Amanda Reason (1:58.51)
Brittany MacLean (1:57.19)
7:50.84 Q
5 1 3  France Ophélie-Cyrielle Étienne (1:58.43)
Margaux Farrell (2:00.06)
Mylene Lazare (1:58.82)
Camille Muffat (1:55.57)
7:52.88 Q
7 1 6  Great Britain Caitlin McClatchey (1:58.22)
Rebecca TuNRer (1:57.87)
Ellie Faulkner (1:59.36)
Joanne Jackson (1:58.86)
7:54.31 Q
8 1 2  Japan Haruka Ueda (1:57.70)
Hanae Ito (1:58.12)
Yayoi Matsumoto (1:59.67)
Aya Takano (1:59.07)
7:54.56 Q
10 1 1  Spain Melania Costa Schmid (1:57.66)
Patricia Castro (1:58.09)
Lydia Morant (1:59.66)
Mireia Belmonte García (1:59.18)
7:54.59 NR
12 1 7  Russia Mariya Baklakova (2:00.75)
Elena Sokolova (1:58.33)
Veronika Popova (1:58.48)
Daria Belyakina (1:58.94)
7:56.50  
15 1 8  Ukraine Daryna Zevina (1:59.68)
Ganna Dzerkal (2:04.68)
Darya Stepanyuk (2:05.49)
Iryna Glavnyk (2:02.82)
8:12.67
 

Heat 2

Rank Heat Lane Nation Swimmers Time Notes
2 2 4  United States Lauren Perdue (1:58.07)
Shannon Vreeland (1:57.04)
Alyssa Anderson (1:57.33)
Dana Vollmer (1:58.31)
7:50.75 Q
4 2 6  Italy Alice Mizzau (1:57.95)
Alice Nesti (1:59.80)
Diletta Carli (1:58.54)
Federica Pellegrini (1:56.46)
7:52.75 Q
6 2 5  China Zhu Qianwei (1:59.23)
Liu Jing (1:58.00)
Chen Qian (1:58.17)
Pang Jiaying (1:58.26)
7:53.66 Q
9 2 3  Hungary Ágnes Mutina (2:00.06)
Zsuzsanna Jakabos (1:57.59)
Katinka Hosszú (1:57.84)
Evelyn Verrasztó (1:59.09)
7:54.58  
11 2 2  New Zealand Natasha Hind (1:58.79)
Samantha Lucie-Smith (1:58.89)
Amaka Gessler (1:59.03)
Melissa Ingram (1:59.21)
7:55.92 NR
13 2 7  Germany Silke Lippok (1:58.43)
Theresa Michalak (2:00.65)
Annika Bruhn (1:59.61)
Daniela Schreiber (2:00.24)
7:58.93  
14 2 1  Slovenia Sara Isaković (1:59.58)
Anja Klinar (2:00.53)
Urša Bežan (2:01.92)
Mojca Sagmeister (2:02.66)
8:04.69  
16 2 8  Poland Katarzyna Wilk (2:05.46)
Karolina Szczepaniak (2:02.99)
Diana Sokołowska (2:01.45)
Alexandra Putra (2:03.86)
8:13.76  
 
 

Women's 100 metres Backstroke

 Host City: London, Great Britain
Venue(s): London Aquatics Centre, Olympic Park, Stratford, London
Date Started: July 29, 2012
Date Finished: July 30, 2012

Summary

[Missy Franklin] (USA) had won the 2011 World Championships at 200 metres and the US Olympic Trials in both backstrokes, but Australian [Emily Seebohm] had been best in the preliminaries in London, setting an Olympic record of 58.23 in her heat. Franklin swam this final only 12 minutes after she left the pool from her 200 freestyle semi-final, in which she placed fourth in her heat. Because of the close time between races she was allowed to cool down in the diving warm-down pool before this final.

Seebohm led out the final, tuNRing 0.14 seconds ahead of world record pace, but Franklin stayed close. She took the lead only a few strokes from the finish and won the gold medal in an American record 58.33, with Seebohm second. Japan's [Aya Terakawa] won the bronze in an Asian record 58.83. The final was very close with the top seven finishers within one second of each other, with Franklin's winning time ranking fourth all-time. This was Franklin's second medal of the 2012 Olympics, after the 4x100 free relay, but she would eventually win five medals and four gold medals in London.

The women's 100 metre backstroke event at the 2012 Summer Olympics took place on 29–30 July at the London Aquatics Centre in London, United Kingdom.

At only 17 years of age, U.S. teenage sensation Missy Franklin, billed as "Missy the Missile" by her fans, stormed home on the final stretch to pick up her first ever Olympic gold medal in swimming. Trailing behind at the halfway tuNR, she pulled away from a tightly packed field with a more destructive force to hit the wall first in an American record of 58.33. Australia's Emily Seebohm started the race with a marginal lead over the rest of the field, but faded down the stretch to settle only for the silver in 58.68. Meanwhile, Japan's Aya Terakawa came up with a spectacular swim to grab the bronze in a superb Asian record of 58.83, holding off the fast-charging Russian swimmer Anastasia Zuyeva to a fourth spot in 59.00.

Great Britain's Gemma Spofforth, the reigning world record holder, finished fifth in 59.20, while China's Zhao Jing (59.23), Australia's Belinda Hocking (59.29) and Zhao's teammate Fu Yuanhui (1:00.50) rounded out the field.

Earlier in the prelims, Seebohm blitzed the field from heat four to lead all swimmers with a sterling Olympic and Oceanian record in 58.23, shaving 0.54 seconds off the standard set by Zimbabwe's Kirsty Coventry in Beijing four years earlier. Coventry, double Olympic silver medalist, missed a chance to reach the final roster with a fourteenth-place effort (1:00.39) from the semifinals.

Records

Prior to this competition, the existing world and Olympic records were as follows.

World record  Gemma Spofforth (GBR) 58.12 Rome, Italy 28 July 2009
Olympic record  Kirsty Coventry (ZIM) 58.77 Beijing, China 11 August 2008

The following records were established during the competition:

Date Event Name Nationality Time Record
July 29 Heat 4 Emily Seebohm  Australia 58.23 OR
 

Final

Rank Lane Name Nationality Time Notes
1st place, gold medalist(s) 5 Missy Franklin  United States 58.33 AM
2nd place, silver medalist(s) 4 Emily Seebohm  Australia 58.68  
3rd place, bronze medalist(s) 3 Aya Terakawa  Japan 58.83 AS
4 2 Anastasia Zuyeva  Russia 59.00  
5 7 Gemma Spofforth  Great Britain 59.20  
6 6 Zhao Jing  China 59.23  
7 1 Belinda Hocking  Australia 59.29  
8 8 Fu Yuanhui  China 1:00.50  
 

Semifinals

Semifinal 1

Rank Lane Name Nationality Time Notes
1 4 Missy Franklin  United States 59.12 Q
2 5 Aya Terakawa  Japan 59.34 Q
3 7 Gemma Spofforth  Great Britain 59.70 Q
4 6 Fu Yuanhui  China 59.82 Q
5 2 Simona Baumrtová  Czech Republic 1:00.02  
6 1 Alexianne Castel  France 1:00.24  
7 8 Arianna Barbieri  Italy 1:00.27  
8 3 Georgia Davies  Great Britain 1:00.56  
 

Semifinal 2

Rank Lane Name Nationality Time Notes
1 4 Emily Seebohm  Australia 58.39 Q
2 2 Zhao Jing  China 59.55 Q
3 3 Anastasia Zuyeva  Russia 59.68 Q
4 5 Belinda Hocking  Australia 59.79 Q
5 6 Julia Wilkinson  Canada 59.91  
6 7 Rachel Bootsma  United States 1:00.04  
7 8 Kirsty Coventry  Zimbabwe 1:00.39  
8 1 Sinead Russell  Canada 1:00.57  
 

Series

Series 1

Rank Line Name nationality Weather Notes
1 3 Karen Vilorio Honduras Honduras (HON) 1: 06.38  
1 4 Monica Ramirez Andorra Andorra (AND) 1: 07.72  
3 5 Ines Remersaro Uruguay Uruguay (URU) 1: 08.03  
4 6 Anahit Barseghyan Armenia Armenia (ARM) 1: 08.19  
5 1 Angelique Trinquier Mónaco Monaco (MON) 1: 10.79  

Series 2

Rank Line Name nationality Weather Notes
1 8 Tao Li Singapur Singapore (SIN) 1: 01.60 NR
1 3 Eyglo Osk Gustafsdottir Islandia Iceland (ISL) 1: 02.40 NR
3 4 Melanie Nocher Irlanda Ireland (IRL) 1: 02.44  
4 1 Anja Carman Eslovenia Slovenia (SLO) 1: 02.68  
5 5 Sanja Jovanovic Croacia Croatia (CRO) 1: 03.38  
6 6 Eszter Povazsay Hungría Hungary (HUN) 1: 03.55  
7 7 Yekaterina Rudenko Kazajistán Kazakhstan (KAZ) 1: 03.64  
8 1 Hazal Sarikaya Turquía Turkey (TUR) 1: 04.80  

Series 3

Rank Line Name nationality Weather Notes
1 4 Maria FeNRanda Gonzalez México Mexico (MEX) 1: 01.28  
1 5 Alicja Tchorz Polonia Poland (POL) 1: 01.44  
3 1 Carolina Colorado Colombia Colombia (COL) 1: 01.81  
4 8 Kimberly Buys Bélgica Belgium (BEL) 1: 01.92 NR
5 7 Melissa ingram Nueva Zelanda New Zealand (NZL) 1: 01.94  
6 6 Ekaterina Avramova Bulgaria Bulgaria (BUL) 1: 02.20  
7 1 Therese Svendsen Suecia Sweden (SWE) 1: 03.11  
8 3 Hoishun Stephanie Au Hong Kong Hong Kong (HKG) 1: 04.31  

Series 4

Rank Line Name nationality Weather Notes
1 5 Emily Seebohm Australia Australia (AUS) 58.23 RO, Q
1 6 Georgia Davies Reino Unido United Kingdom (GBR) 59.92 Q
3 4 Zhao Jing China China (CHN) 59.97 Q
4 8 Kirsty Coventry Zimbabue Zimbabwe (ZIM) 1: 00.24 Q
5 7 Arianna Barbieri Italia Italy (ITA) 1: 00.25 Q
6 3 Mie Nielsen Dinamarca Denmark (DEN) 1: 00.38  
7 1 Duane da Rocha España Spain (ESP) 1: 00.57  
8 1 Sharon van Rouwendaal Países Bajos Netherlands (NED) 1: 00.61  

Series 5

Rank Line Name nationality Weather Notes
1 4 Anastasia Zueva Rusia Russia (RUS) 59.88 Q
1 6 Julia Wilkinson Canadá Canada (CAN) 59.94 Q
3 5 Rachel Bootsma Estados Unidos United States (USA) 1: 00.03 Q
4 7 Gemma Spofforth Reino Unido United Kingdom (GBR) 1: 00.05 Q
5 3 Sinead Russell Canadá Canada (CAN) 1: 00.10 Q
6 1 Daryna Zevina Ucrania Ukraine (UKR) 1: 00.57  
7 1 Fabiola Molina Brasil Brazil (BRA) 1: 01.40  
8 8 Elena Gemo Italia Italy (ITA) 1: 01.77  

Series 6

Rank Line Name nationality Weather Notes
1 4 Missy franklin Estados Unidos United States (USA) 59.37 Q
1 3 Belinda Hocking Australia Australia (AUS) 59.61 Q
3 5 Aya Terakawa Japón Japan (JPN) 59.82 Q
4 1 Fu Yuanhui China China (CHN) 59.96 Q
5 8 Simona Baumrtová República Checa Czech Republic (CZE) 59.99 NR, Q
6 1 Alexianne Castel Francia France (FRA) 1: 00.16 Q
7 6 Jenny Mensing Alemania Germany (GER) 1: 00.72  
8 7 Laure Manaudou Francia France (FRA) 1: 01.03  
 

Women's 200 metres Backstroke

 Host City: London, Great Britain
Venue(s): London Aquatics Centre, Olympic Park, Stratford, London
Date Started: August 2, 2012
Date Finished: August 3, 2012

Summary

Four days earlier American [Missy Franklin] had won gold in the 100 backstroke, and she later added a relay gold in the 4x—200 free. As the 2011 World Champion in this event she was favored on this night and came through in spectacular fashion. Franklin led from the start, tuNRing in 29.53, just ahead of Great Britain's [Lizzie Simmonds]. But at 100 metres Franklin was well ahead, tuNRing almost ½-second under the world record split. She maintained that pace and came home for gold in a world record 2:04.06, 0.75 seconds better than the mark set by [Kirsty Coventry] (ZIM) at the 2009 Worlds. Behind Franklin, Russian [Anastasiya Zuyeva] closed fast for the silver medal in 2:05.92, while Franklin's teammate, [Elizabeth Beisel] won the bronze, as Simmonds dropped back to fourth. Coventry contested the final but was never a medal factor and finished sixth.

Franklin became the sixth woman to win the 100/200 backstroke double, but the first since [Diana Mocanu] (ROU) in 2000. This was her third gold medal of the 2012 Olympics, which she would finish with five medals and four golds.

The women's 200-metre backstroke event at the 2012 Summer Olympics took place on 2–3 August at the London Aquatics Centre in London, United Kingdom.

U.S. teenage sensation Missy Franklin blistered the field with a remarkable world record in textile to strike a backstroke double for the first time, since Romania's Diana Mocanu did so in 2000. Dominating the race from the start, she threw down a sterling time of 2:04.06 to broaden a full-body length gap over the rest of the field and to slice three-quarters of a second (0.75) off the previous record set by Zimbabwe's Kirsty Coventry in a now-banned polyurethane bodysuit from the 2009 World Championships. Russia's Anastasia Zuyeva cleared a 2:06-barrier to take the silver in 2:05.92, while Franklin's teammate Elizabeth Beisel snatched the bronze in 2:06.55, handing over an entire medal haul for the Americans with a one-three finish.

Backed by a raucous home crowd, Great Britain's Elizabeth Simmonds fell short of the podium with a fourth-place time in 2:07.26. Australia's Meagan Nay finished fifth in 2:07.43, while Coventry, a two-time Olympic champion, missed a chance to produce another historic three-peat as she claimed a distant sixth spot in 2:08.18.France's Alexianne Castel (2:08.43) and Canada's Sinead Russell (2:09.86) closed out the championship field.

Records

Prior to this competition, the existing world and Olympic records were as follows.

World record  Kirsty Coventry (ZIM) 2:04.81 Rome, Italy 1 August 2009
Olympic record  Kirsty Coventry (ZIM) 2:05.24 Beijing, China 16 August 2008

The following records were established during the competition:

Date Event Name Nationality Time Record
August 3 Final Missy Franklin  United States 2:04.06 WR, OR
 

Final

Rank Lane Name Nationality Time Notes
1st place, gold medalist(s) 5 Missy Franklin  United States 2:04.06 WR
2nd place, silver medalist(s) 6 Anastasia Zuyeva  Russia 2:05.92  
3rd place, bronze medalist(s) 4 Elizabeth Beisel  United States 2:06.55  
4 1 Elizabeth Simmonds  Great Britain 2:07.26  
5 3 Meagen Nay  Australia 2:07.43  
6 7 Kirsty Coventry  Zimbabwe 2:08.18  
7 2 Alexianne Castel  France 2:08.43  
8 8 Sinead Russell  Canada 2:09.86  
 

Semifinals

Semifinal 1

Rank Lane Name Nationality Time Notes
1 4 Elizabeth Beisel  United States 2:06.18 Q
2 5 Meagen Nay  Australia 2:07.42 Q
3 6 Anastasia Zuyeva  Russia 2:07.88 Q
4 3 Alexianne Castel  France 2:08.24 Q
5 1 Elizabeth Simmonds  Great Britain 2:08.48 Q
6 8 Sharon van Rouwendaal  Netherlands 2:09.50  
7 2 Duane da Rocha  Spain 2:09.88  
8 7 Simona Baumrtová  Czech Republic 2:10.18  
 

Semifinal 2

Rank Lane Name Nationality Time Notes
1 4 Missy Franklin  United States 2:06.84 Q
2 5 Kirsty Coventry  Zimbabwe 2:08.32 Q
3 6 Sinead Russell  Canada 2:08.76 Q
4 7 Stephanie Proud  Great Britain 2:09.04  
5 3 Belinda Hocking  Australia 2:09.35  
6 2 Daryna Zevina  Ukraine 2:09.70  
7 8 Jenny Mensing  Germany 2:10.68  
8 1 Karin Prinsloo  South Africa 2:11.42  
 

Heat 1

Rank Heat Lane Name Nationality Time Notes
26 1 4 Nguyễn Thị Ánh Viên  Vietnam 2:13.35  
27 1 6 Carolina Colorado  Colombia 2:13.64 NR
31 1 2 Ham Chan-mi  South Korea 2:15.30  
35 1 3 Dorina Szekeres  Hungary 2:18.16  
37 1 5 Yulduz Kuchkarova  Uzbekistan 2:18.60  

Heat 2

Rank Heat Lane Name Nationality Time Notes
12 2 6 Simona Baumrtová  Czech Republic 2:10.03 Q, NR
21 2 4 Miyu Otsuka  Japan 2:11.65  
24 2 5 María FeNRanda González  Mexico 2:12.75  
25 2 7 Anja Čarman  Slovenia 2:13.01  
28 2 2 Mie Nielsen  Denmark 2:13.89  
33 2 1 Kim Daniela Pavlin  Croatia 2:15.67  
34 2 3 Melanie Nocher  Ireland 2:16.29  
36 2 8 Hoi Shun Stephanie Au  Hong Kong 2:18.47  

Heat 3

Rank Heat Lane Name Nationality Time Notes
2 3 5 Elizabeth Beisel  United States 2:07.82 Q
6 3 6 Alexianne Castel  France 2:08.92 Q
7 3 3 Sinead Russell  Canada 2:09.04 Q
8 3 4 Anastasia Zuyeva  Russia 2:09.36 Q
13 3 1 Karin Prinsloo  South Africa 2:10.34 Q
19 3 7 Bai Anqi  China 2:11.26  
23 3 2 Alessia Filippi  Italy 2:12.40  
29 3 8 Alicja Tchórz  Poland 2:14.02  

Heat 4

Rank Heat Lane Name Nationality Time Notes
5 4 4 Belinda Hocking  Australia 2:08.75 Q
9 4 3 Daryna Zevina  Ukraine 2:09.40 Q
10 4 7 Duane da Rocha  Spain 2:09.72 Q
14 4 5 Elizabeth Simmonds  Great Britain 2:10.37 Q
15 4 6 Jenny Mensing  Germany 2:10.54 Q
17 4 1 Melissa Ingram  New Zealand 2:10.63  
18 4 2 Hilary Caldwell  Canada 2:10.75  
32 4 8 Ekaterina Avramova  Bulgaria 2:15.44  

Heat 5

Rank Heat Lane Name Nationality Time Notes
1 5 4 Missy Franklin  United States 2:07.54 Q
3 5 2 Kirsty Coventry  Zimbabwe 2:08.14 Q
4 5 5 Meagen Nay  Australia 2:08.40 Q
11 5 7 Stephanie Proud  Great Britain 2:10.01 Q
16 5 3 Sharon van Rouwendaal  Netherlands 2:10.60 Q
20 5 8 Eygló Ósk Gústafsdóttir  Iceland 2:11.31 NR
22 5 1 Yao Yige  China 2:12.14  
30 5 6 Laure Manaudou  France 2:14.29  

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